Main definitions of mould in English

: mould1mould2mould3

mould1

(US mold)

noun

  • 1A hollow container used to give shape to molten or hot liquid material when it cools and hardens.

    ‘the smith would pour the molten metal into the shaped mould’
    ‘a jelly mould’
    • ‘In low-pressure casting the steel mold is above the molten aluminum.’
    • ‘Spread up the sides of the moulds and make a hollow and then fill with cooked mince, top with the crumb mixture and bake in a low oven to warm through.’
    • ‘The sheaths are treated and baked in moulds to give them shape.’
    • ‘They can be melted at a low temperature and shaped into a mold as they cool back into a solid.’
    • ‘Synthetic zircon is used to make gemstones that resemble fine diamonds and as a refractory material in foundry molds and furnace linings.’
    • ‘The artificial limb is made inserting the mould into the molten material.’
    • ‘‘I will put material into the mold and cast it into the same shape as their gesture,’ Jong said.’
    • ‘The nozzles and the suction device are formed independently from the upper mold and the lower mold.’
    • ‘Casting is a process by which a liquid or molten material is shaped by pouring into a mould that contains the negative impression of a desired model.’
    • ‘Spoon into six lightly oiled dariole moulds or mini-pudding moulds, cover with cling film and chill overnight.’
    • ‘Passing light through the transparent mold caused the material to cross-link and harden.’
    • ‘The chips are in color, with denominations, type of mold, inlay and inserts indicated and an indication of the level of rarity.’
    • ‘Like the Tapara bed, it contains some shelly material and molds, but the most readily recoverable and complete fossils are present in cobble-sized concretions.’
    • ‘We had an exhibition coming up - it was Australia's Lost Kingdoms - and we needed skilled people to make moulds and casts of material that was going into that exhibition.’
    • ‘Then he pours liquid gelatin into the mold and lets it harden.’
    • ‘Cast iron is very versatile, as it can be poured into moulds when molten and cast into complicated shapes, but is very brittle.’
    • ‘The electrode materials are placed in a mold and left to harden.’
    • ‘Brooches were made either by hammering a piece of metal into the right shape or by casting molten metal in a mould.’
    • ‘Line two large teacups or similar shaped 200 ml moulds with clingfilm.’
    • ‘However, its hardness also created problems: it quickly wore out the tools and moulds used to shape it, making it an expensive material to work with.’
    • ‘The process to make the cap includes positioning viscous plastic material in a mold to produce the desired retention member shape.’
    • ‘The pewterer poured the molten metal into the mold, extracted the piece when it had cooled, and carefully finished it.’
    cast, die, form, matrix, shape, container
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A pudding or savoury mousse made in a mould.
      ‘a lobster mould with a sauce of carrots and port’
      • ‘There are the usual Jello molds, spinach dips and salads, green nacho chips, and pickle displays.’
      • ‘Salmon mold is a delicious dish, very attractive and it's definitely different from common and popular recipes for salmon that you can always find.’
      • ‘A change from the usual way of serving salmon can be had by making a salmon mold.’
      • ‘The book had no pictures, except on the cover, which showed a large roast of lamb, fish baked in white sauce accompanied by boiled carrots, and a mould of bright red gelatin.’
      • ‘Both times were screaming fiascos and we couldn't understand why, so we decided to blame it on the recipe and the molds, and we moved on with our lives.’
      • ‘Judy suggests garnishing the mold with fresh raspberries and whole cranberries.’
      • ‘This is the cookbook I do half my baking out of, and all of my jello molds.’
  • 2in singular A distinctive and typical style, form, or character.

    ‘he's a superb striker in the same mould as Gary Lineker’
    ‘he planned to conquer the world as a roving reporter in the mould of his hero’
    • ‘What he's really fired up about is the fact that Monica is a woman in the mould of Sophia Loren and Claudia Cardinale.’
    • ‘Will the new Pope be in the mould of John Paul or will he signal a new style of leadership?’
    • ‘Just by accident I put it to my eye and found it was a microscope in the mould of Robert Hooke's single lens ones and that it would give me a massive close-up view of silhouettes.’
    • ‘As a youth he played in a whole variety of positions, but when Stuttgart picked him up at 10-years old, he was a playmaker in the mould of an Andy Moller or Thomas Hassler.’
    • ‘Give him his due though, his voice improves with age and Young is possibly one of the country's finest soul singers of the classic mould.’
    • ‘He's in the mould of Robert Millar [Scotland's 1984 Tour de France King of the Mountains] as his ability is very specific.’
    • ‘Charlie is extremely nice and very much in the mould of Mr Chatterton, my old history teacher, in terms of his generally affable, laid-back, chatty nature.’
    • ‘The switch to the West Coast offense doesn't mean the team will become a pass-first team in the mold of the old 49ers.’
    • ‘Rather than quick players whose strength is their movement and first touch, Hartson is more in the mould of a traditional target man.’
    • ‘Courageous in the mould of Veronica Guerin, the investigative journalist murdered in Ireland, she has gone on the record about the killers' identities.’
    • ‘‘Great,’ that is, in the mould of Pele, the legend with whom he was first compared as a 15-year-old.’
    • ‘By the early 1950s Minton, with his private income, flamboyant personality and prodigious talent, was a celebrity in the mould of today's Britart pack.’
    • ‘Wilson crafts this social satire in the mould of Thackeray or Trollope, crisscrossing class barriers with fluid facility.’
    • ‘A tall, athletic footballer, he is good in the set-piece and very mobile - a player in the mould of Scotland's Scott Murray.’
    • ‘What was a masterful, elegiac character study in the mould of Le Carré's classic A Perfect Spy becomes an angry disquisition on contemporary geopolitics.’
    • ‘He is very much in the mould of a typical U.S. Open player - ‘fairways and greens’ - and he noticeably plays better on tougher courses.’
    • ‘Mr Tuffin is more in the mould of the late actor Marlon Brando.’
    • ‘England must find a flanker in the mould of their coach, and a fit-again Lewis Moody could answer their prayers’
    • ‘In her maps she might be seen as a landscape artist cast in the mould of the Romantics.’
    • ‘It was noticeable from their warm-up match against a Dublin selection on Wednesday afternoon that they have travelled without a big target man in the mould of Barry Hall or Wayne Carey.’
    • ‘The key player for Heriot's was skipper Rory Lawson, who is playing more and more in the mould of father Alan, a former Scotland scrum-half.’
    character, nature, temperament, temper, disposition, cast of mind, turn of mind, mettle
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1archaic Form or shape, especially the features or physique of a person or the build of an animal.
      ‘he was manly in size, mould, and bearing’
      pattern, form, shape, format, structure, configuration, construction, frame, build, model, design, arrangement, organization, formation, figure, cast, kind, brand, make, line, type, cut, style
      View synonyms
  • 3A frame or template for producing mouldings.

    ‘all the moulds, masters or originals, had been kept for reference’
    • ‘He showed them how he uses hand tools and traditional early Victorian moulds to create his designs for brickwork.’
    • ‘With the cornicing, for example, Bryant had a mould taken from the original and a new plaster cornice made for the new ceiling.’
    • ‘With the second seat, I wanted to add a really slick bubble canopy so after lofting the lines we built a mold for the canopy and sent it to Evans who blew the unit.’
    • ‘Mantels made of plaster offer a very smooth finish and, because they are poured in molds, a level of intricate detail not usually achieved by wood carving.’

verb

[with object]
  • 1Form (an object) out of malleable material.

    ‘mould the figure from white fondant’
    • ‘We cooked outside, on a butane burner his father melted lead with to mold his trotline weights.’
    • ‘To reduce friction and ensure the timely release of the protective guard, however, each component had to be molded from a different material.’
    • ‘I think it was a bowl and I was abusing it, using it outside on the front steps to mold snow sculptures.’
    • ‘At about the time Hanson began making his realistic figures in the 1960s, other artists were also making life-sized figures molded from actual people.’
    shape, form, fashion, model, work, construct, frame, make, create, configure, manufacture, design, sculpt, sculpture, throw
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Give a shape to (malleable material)
      ‘take the marzipan and mould it into a cone shape’
      • ‘In order to mold glass into a meaningful shape, the artisan must blow through a tube into molten glass.’
      • ‘There spoke not the dignified statesman of the academic tradition who moulds events as a sculptor moulds his clay.’
      • ‘He sketches a design first and then moulds the precious metal.’
      • ‘The paper is then moulded into the shape of clay sculptures that Stephen and David have designed, and attached to the sculptures to protect them from damage.’
      • ‘She experimented with new materials, molding plastics into forms that evoked or described fish, animals, insects, and plants.’
      • ‘Raw materials used for CCM discs are made up of carbon fiber, phenol resin and silicon; the fibers and resin are molded in the geometric shape of the braking band.’
      • ‘Even in the dim, dusty filtered daylight I could see the intricate detail of the carved stone and molded gold.’
      • ‘Silicone rubber is easily molded, serving as a replacement for body parts.’
      • ‘The nimble fingers of epicureans moulded vegetables into new forms and shapes.’
      • ‘I am not familiar with molding clay, but if the item was a sand casting, the third piece could be a master pattern used to make the mold itself.’
      • ‘That's true, but since almost everyone now uses molded plastics the shape doesn't matter at all.’
      • ‘Other floor mats feature materials such as plush nylon and molded rubber and plastic.’
      • ‘A wad of linen is painstakingly molded into the precise shape of a feline nose.’
      • ‘Play with hair paste, gel, molding mud or wax to smooth fringe hair out of your eyes.’
      • ‘The hood facepiece is made of soft grey or black shaped moulded rubber, including cheek pockets for two lightweight filters.’
      • ‘A unidirectional current of water moving over sand moulds the sediment into a series of bedforms which migrate downcurrent.’
      • ‘For instance, the mystery and the power of fire to be able to produce different artifacts, to mold iron, to cook food that could then be preserved, all led to a sanctification of fire as Agni.’
      • ‘Instead of shaping the frame using costly stamping components, the metal is molded using ultra-high-pressure water.’
      • ‘Tops creates moulded glass sculptures using kiln casting, inspired by everyday items such as taps and bolts, with part of the sculpture in the original metal, and the rest in glass.’
      shape, form, fashion, model, work, construct, frame, make, create, configure, manufacture, design, sculpt, sculpture, throw
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Influence the formation or development of.
      ‘the professionals who were helping to mould US policy’
      • ‘As Leeds United battle to stay in existence, Birmingham City directors continue to mould the midlands outfit into a club with ambitions to join the Premiership elite.’
      • ‘Rarely has the development in a State had the potential for moulding the country's politics, for good or for bad, as will be the case with Gujarat.’
      • ‘These successes, if that is what they are, are tinged with a jealousy that legal writers elsewhere have a more publicly acknowledged involvement in moulding the law's development.’
      • ‘Snead was molded into a figure who would amuse us, leave us in awe and make us embrace him as something uniquely American.’
      • ‘Created in 1952 during the Darst administration, this loose coalition molded land-use policy alongside City Hall.’
      • ‘On another level, language is analyzed as an object that is used to control and mold social relationships.’
      • ‘Homegrown terrorists are moulded by similar shifts and trends influencing terrorists in other parts of the world.’
      • ‘Within it, humans are controlling or molding the paths of technology.’
      • ‘The movies of the time did more than represent or reflect society - they influenced and moulded it, too.’
      • ‘Many influences - Wesleyan, Moravian, and Antinomian - molded his thought.’
      • ‘What he sees, what he eats and the type of lifestyle at home is the influence which will mold his character for the rest of his life.’
      • ‘Experience in great soccer teams in Europe and Southern America both at national and club level reveal trends where working with as many as forty players a coach has moulded a world class team after three years.’
      • ‘More than 20 years in Dutch football both as a player and coach moulded him into the man he is today and now, after a disappointing start to the season, he is beginning to make his mark on his team.’
      • ‘It is also the duty of educational institutions to mould the personality of students.’
      • ‘The second dominating influence moulding his life was the threat of blindness that hit him just after he had arrived at Edinburgh University as an outstanding sportsman and scholar aged 17.’
      • ‘Let us hope and pray that the agents of education will realize the great responsibility they have in moulding the future citizens of the world, so that our progress towards the achievement of our ideal will be accelerated.’
      • ‘Haslett, a noted tough guy, knows how to mold a swarming, aggressive unit, and he could be the perfect fit for the mentality St. Louis wants to adopt.’
      • ‘Fisher's perspective on the discipline was molded by quite distinct intellectual influences.’
      • ‘It is, therefore, American public opinion that must be influenced and moulded.’
      • ‘He inherited a strong work ethic from his father, Bob, a publican in Coatbridge, and from the coaches who moulded his early years in football.’
      determine, direct, control, guide, lead, influence, shape, form, fashion, affect, make
      View synonyms
  • 2as adjective moulded(of a column, ceiling, or other part of a building) having a decorative moulding.

    ‘a corridor with a moulded cornice’
    • ‘A variety of objects fill the two main rooms, among which predominates a series of porcelain and brass objects on a moulded shelf near St Anne's bed.’
    • ‘Or it may have thought about adding wings and a novelty moulded roof in the shape of Barney the Dinosaur.’
    • ‘The first and largest bedroom, overlooking the rear garden, is a well proportioned double with polished timber floorboards and moulded ceiling cornices.’
    • ‘There are also plaster-skimmed walls throughout, regency paneled doors and a moulded skirting.’
    • ‘Most hideously misguided of all is the UPVC front door - complemented beautifully by a moulded plastic doorframe.’
    • ‘Dark paneling stretched from the molded ceiling to the thick pile-woven carpet, bordered by intricate friezes and shocks of gilt bronze leaves.’
    • ‘Larger pieces are moulded with figures such as Joan of Arc.’
    • ‘The marble floor was a light pink color and the molded walls were white with arches that had little pink and yellow flowers dancing in it.’
    • ‘The final room on this level is another double bedroom with a black marble fireplace, corner wash-hand basin and moulded ceiling cornice.’
    • ‘Down each side are doors, supporting by moulded pillars.’
    • ‘She looked up at the molded ceiling, blinking back new tears.’
    • ‘The cottage teapot had a moulded door with roses round and windows, with green, pink and brown paint applied in blobs not quite properly filling the outlines.’
    • ‘There is underfloor heating in four zones on the ground and first floor rooms of Raleigh North, while all the doors, architraves, moulded skirting, sills and stairs are solid teak.’
    • ‘An arched timber entrance door opens up into a lobby with a stained wooden floor, a leaded-style window and moulded coving.’
    • ‘The cabinet on offer contains a moulded swan-neck pediment carved with flower heads, between which is a rather impressive carved eagle crest.’
    • ‘Behind this is the family room which has rich red walls, a moulded timber ceiling and a cast-iron open fireplace with slate hearth.’
    • ‘I'd someday like to make a moulded window using transparent black acrylic, creating the same sort of effect I saw made into a car bonnet once.’
    • ‘Up the road in High Street is a set of old semi-detached houses, with attractive moulded pillars supporting the tin roofs over the verandah, with a gable at the end.’
    • ‘This last is accomplished by copying a Hausmanian building on the Champs Elysees and creating its replica in a moulded concrete facade.’
    • ‘The former NatWest bank in the High Street was built in 1838 and boasts high - moulded ceilings and Gothic columns.’

Phrases

  • break the mould

    • Put an end to a restrictive pattern of events or behaviour by doing things in a markedly different way.

      ‘his work did much to break the mould of the old urban sociology’
      • ‘He was probably the father figure of British comedy in the latter part of the last century and he truly broke the mould.’
      • ‘In fact, judging by the ardour of the enthused throng, the diversity of Friday night's performance broke the mould as it existed to this reviewer and many others.’
      • ‘‘If there's a pattern that exists, we're going to break the mold,’ he says.’
      • ‘It is about being willing to take a few risks, having the courage to break the mould and not just blindly following a set pattern in your life.’
      • ‘Rob Thomas' late, lamented Cupid broke the mold for cinematic TV shows that don't fit into the prescribed categories of one-hour dramas or half-hour sitcoms.’
      • ‘His response, in the late 1950s and early 1960s, was a series of pieces that broke the mould of the serialism that was then the lingua franca of the avant-garde.’
      • ‘What it boils down to I am afraid is that everybody is too busy looking out for themselves and is too scared to break the mould of what society has defined as acceptable behaviour for its members.’
      • ‘In 1993 we broke the mould by becoming the first club from this area in 68 years to win the Scottish Junior Cup.’
      • ‘Would someone attempt to break the mold and introduce a different element?’
      • ‘Last week, however, the mother-of-two broke the mould by walking away from the English Court of Appeal with £10m, or half her former husband Harry's fortune.’
      • ‘And what Irish woman will ever forget Mary Robinson's history making triumph in 1990, when she broke the mould by becoming the first woman to be elected President of Ireland?’
      • ‘‘She broke the mould,’ says a Sinn Fein spokesman, ‘of past British secretaries of state, who tended to be quite distant.’’
      • ‘SIX young students successfully broke the mould of generations within their families by becoming the very first to participate in a State examination.’
      • ‘Prior to 2000, when Limerick broke the mould by beating Waterford in the final to win their one and only title, Kerry and Cork have divided the spoils between them since the championship began in 1962.’
      • ‘Big Sandy and his band certainly broke the mould with last year's Night Tides - an unexpectedly dark album layered with bewitching instrumentation and haunting lyrics.’
      • ‘Linda Hartell-Payne, owner of the Dalesman Café said the Cumbrian contractors completely broke the mould of what people have come to think about British workmanship.’
      • ‘Of course, Sean Lineen, Boroughmuir's co-coach and a New Zealander, broke the mould, while others such as Howarth, Ben Fisher and James Reilly have proved astute acquisitions.’
      • ‘I broke the mould and moved out to an office,’ Mr Turner told the Herald.’
      • ‘Cookery shows broke the mould (quite literally in some cases) with lively young chefs revealing the cherished tricks of their trade and provoking thousands of us to be more adventurous with our groceries.’
      • ‘Bryant says there is a tendency among producers to look for work that resembles past successes, yet in the US shows such as Rent became hits because they broke the mould.’

Origin

Middle English: apparently from Old French modle, from Latin modulus (see modulus).

Pronunciation

mould

/məʊld/

Main definitions of mould in English

: mould1mould2mould3

mould2

(US mold)

noun

mass noun
  • A furry growth of minute fungi occurring typically in moist warm conditions, especially on food or other organic matter.

    The fungi belong to the subdivision Deuteromycotina (or Ascomycotina)

    ‘mould may flourish unhindered’
    count noun ‘moist food becomes covered with moulds’
    • ‘Calcium propionate is added to foods to inhibit mold growth.’
    • ‘Discard both the cloves and the liquid if there are signs of mold or yeast growth on the surface of the wine or vinegar.’
    • ‘The fact is mold is a living fungus that exists all around us.’
    • ‘Most human exposure to the toxin is due to improper storage conditions which foster mould growth.’
    • ‘Humidification and dehumidification systems also require proper maintenance: They must be kept clean to prevent growth of molds and fungi.’
    • ‘A life food diet excludes cooked food and starch because they cause mold, fungi, and yeast to form in the body.’
    • ‘These results confirmed, on a higher number of plants, that clone 28 exhibits tolerance against grey mould under in vitro conditions.’
    • ‘A lack of oxygen helps prevent the growth of yeast, mould and bacteria.’
    • ‘Other products are designed to inhibit the growth of mold and mildew.’
    • ‘Known as ‘diesel algae’ these are primarily fungi, yeast and mold contaminants.’
    • ‘The dampness and high temperature of about 25 degrees Celsius provides the best conditions for mould to grow and reproduce.’
    • ‘As far as diseases are concerned, fungal infections such as grey mould and powdery mildew are the main culprits.’
    • ‘And, under the microscope, that food just became mold, fungi, and yeast fairly quickly.’
    • ‘Even small amounts of moisture feed nasty mold and mildew growths that can affect your health and lead to major structural damage in your house.’
    • ‘One can preserve food quite well simply by reducing the moisture content, but more importantly mold growth is highly dependent on how contaminated the food is with mold or fungus spores to begin with.’
    • ‘Moist cooling ducts promote mold and other water-borne bacteria.’
    • ‘Excess humidity inside your home also promotes the growth of mold, fungi and bacteria.’
    • ‘The growth of mold and mildew also are slowed by natural light.’
    • ‘Moisture also causes additional problems, such as mold and mildew growth.’
    • ‘And, one of the most critical new issues in buildings, it resists the growth of mold and mildew.’
    mildew, fungus, must, mouldiness, mustiness
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: probably from obsolete mould, past participle of moul ‘grow mouldy’, of Scandinavian origin; compare with Old Norse mygla ‘grow mouldy’.

Pronunciation

mould

/məʊld/

Main definitions of mould in English

: mould1mould2mould3

mould3

(US mold)

noun

mass nounBritish
  • 1Soft loose earth.

    ‘the ground was soft and damp, with old leaves thick in the mould’
    See also leaf mould
    earth, soil, dirt, loam, humus
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The upper soil of cultivated land, especially when rich in organic matter.
      ‘gravel and sand over clay, topped by fine vegetable mould’
      • ‘The solutions exhibited strong alkaline pH values for slag and washed slag while the pH of the soil solution of garden mould was only slightly alkaline.’

Origin

Old English molde, from a Germanic base meaning ‘pulverize or grind’; related to meal.

Pronunciation

mould

/məʊld/