Main definitions of mood in English

: mood1mood2

mood1

noun

  • 1A temporary state of mind or feeling.

    ‘he appeared to be in a very good mood about something’
    • ‘Exercising releases chemicals in the brain, such as serotonin, that have a strong affect on your mood, helping reduce anxiety, stress and depression.’
    • ‘I am good at identifying what I am thinking and how it affects my mood.’
    • ‘Healthy people remedy bad moods by accessing positive personal memories.’
    • ‘I still get depressed and I still get into bad moods, but that engulfing sadness is something I haven't experienced in quite the same way since.’
    • ‘In this case, a worker may try to dispel a bad mood by suspending work, rather than searching for a new solution.’
    • ‘Sighing as she walked, Molly felt her depressing mood getting rather worse as she walked closer and closer to the plane.’
    • ‘Depression is a disorder that affects your thoughts, moods, feelings, behavior and physical health.’
    • ‘Her bad moods were still affecting all of us, and I had begun to get really worried.’
    • ‘Stress is believed to impair one's ability to regulate moods and prevent mild sadness from deepening and persisting.’
    • ‘Small wonder that your mood and self-esteem are plummeting and you're looking for comfort from food.’
    • ‘For that matter, hot summer days tend to put people in a bad mood.’
    • ‘There was nothing that bothered him more than seeing his friends in bad moods, for he knew what it felt like to be in a slump.’
    • ‘It can also trigger different thoughts that affect moods of sadness, happiness and anger.’
    • ‘I honestly believe video games are one of the best methods to rid your mind of a bad mood or of a bad incident.’
    • ‘Music can enhance a good mood, confirm a bad mood, console me, remind me of specific events, people, places in my life.’
    • ‘Her particular interest is studying intense moods.’
    • ‘If this is him in a bad mood, no wonder so many people declare him a joy to work with.’
    • ‘Ryan returned and Blake greeted him, wondering why his friend was in such a bad mood.’
    • ‘He's finding ways to manage his moods and feelings.’
    • ‘Another way in which emotions and moods affect judgement is the well-known relationship between good mood and overconfidence.’
    frame of mind, state of mind, emotional state, humour, temper
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The atmosphere or pervading tone of something.
      ‘a concept album which captures the mood of modern times’
      • ‘Each note expresses the emotion of the band as they seek to capture the mood and personality of their recording environment.’
      • ‘The variety is what strikes a nerve with me; every track has a different mood, atmosphere and pace.’
      • ‘Both sound and music are critical to the cinematic experience - they help set the mood, the tone, and the ambience of the level.’
      • ‘Colour couldn't create the mood and tone I was going for: the character is drained of emotion, devoid of attachment to reality, thus there is no colour.’
      • ‘There's far too much silence when there could be music to contribute to the mood and atmosphere of the moment.’
      • ‘When the public smells a rat, however, the reaction of the establishment in seeking to soothe the public mood often makes matters worse.’
      • ‘The meditative mood and ethereal atmosphere of the painting create an aura of intimacy that counters the epic scale of its composition.’
      • ‘The first, representing initial chaos, generates a mood of excited anticipation rather than fear.’
      • ‘The artistry comes when you take someone else's music, and use it to create a mood or an atmosphere, or send people on an aural journey of sorts.’
      • ‘It was one of her father's favorite songs, but she wondered why in the English version they had changed the mood and tone of the song.’
      • ‘Painters in turn portrayed the poems, capturing the moods or personality of the characters or themes.’
      • ‘The colours are deep and rich and help set an operatic mood and tone for almost every scene.’
      • ‘After this fourth sequel, the series went into quarantine for three years, as if in reaction to the public mood of despair and anxiety.’
      • ‘Clearly, there are noticeable changes in the national mood as fear and anxiety pervade throughout the country.’
      • ‘The pictures captured the mood or essence of the songs.’
      • ‘They seek to play on the public mood of fear and mistrust to demand that we change our lifestyles to fit the new conformism.’
      • ‘Ferdinand's concession of a constitution at the end of January thus provoked a temporary mood of enthusiasm and popular unity.’
      • ‘As vocal as the fans were, and as hard as they tried to liven the atmosphere, the mood at times was quite mundane.’
      • ‘The mood and tone of the book are set through black and white graphics with occasional bursts of colour.’
      • ‘Her work tries to capture the mood and character embedded in these areas.’
      atmosphere, feeling, spirit, ambience, aura, character, tenor, flavour, quality, climate, feel, tone, key
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    2. 1.2as modifier (especially of music) inducing or suggestive of a particular feeling or state of mind.
      ‘mood music’
      • ‘Whether we choose the right music is another matter, because music can change your mood states.’
      • ‘He's going to be producing CD's of mood music and meditation music for her.’
      • ‘There's a jazz quartet playing mood music under the neon coloured strip lights barely audible in the hubbub of a full bar and seating area.’
      • ‘It's pure mood music - ten instrumental tracks that take you somewhere.’
      • ‘They were playing mood music in the Doctor's surgery as we waited.’
      • ‘It's great mood music, often good for zoned-out highway driving, and always appropriate as background music for doing work.’
      • ‘The right mood music can do a lot for an evening of love, but there's no accounting for taste.’
      • ‘Their sound is mellow and gentle: mood music with a twist of soul and a dash of funk.’
      • ‘Such is the quality of his work, that he does not need the neon lights, mood music and other special effects which so hampered last year's offering.’
      • ‘It's mood music, sure, but more specifically dinner music - really romantic dinner music.’
      • ‘The lyrics may be a bit melodramatic, but on a whole, this is perfect mood music to go with candles and dimmed lights.’
      • ‘It would be too easy to turn it into another documentary style presentation complete with archive footage, computer animation and mood music.’
      • ‘I mean, you can't really have the full experience unless you've got appropriate mood music can you?’
      • ‘If the trickling water feature doesn't start to calm you, then the mood music definitely will.’
      • ‘He turned on some mood music, but very low, just like I like it.’
      • ‘It's incredible mood music, with nice subtle touches throughout.’
      • ‘The four-course dinner is served in a small, intimate dining room, lit with candles and mood music playing quietly in the background.’
      • ‘If the rest of the album fails to measure up entirely, there is still plenty of atmospheric mood music to get you thinking, or have you reflecting on any time spent in one of the greatest cities in the world.’
      in the right frame of mind for, in the right frame of mind to, feeling like, ready for, ready to, wanting to, inclined to, disposed to, minded to, interested in, keen on, keen to, eager to, enthusiastic about, willing to, game for
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  • 2An angry, irritable, or sullen state of mind.

    ‘he was obviously in a mood’
    • ‘Sometimes, you curse and scream at the person driving next to you because you are in a mood.’
    • ‘Most of the time if Nicole told me to do something, I would, because if I did not do what she told me to, she would get in a mood with me.’
    • ‘Natalie just called from the car and she's in a mood.’
    • ‘In a recent email to a friend, I apologized for being in a mood.’
    • ‘We went because it was easier to find a parking place than to deal with Mother in a mood.’
    • ‘This cold is hanging on and seems to have left me in a mood.’
    • ‘But then other people seem to like it a lot so maybe I was in a mood.’
    • ‘I may be in a mood this morning.’
    • ‘The boyfriend had taken the keys to his bedsit off her and gone home in a mood.’
    • ‘They're the band you put on when you are in a mood.’
    bad mood, temper, bad temper, fit of bad temper, fit of ill temper, sulk, pet, the sulks, fit of pique, low spirits, depression, bout of moping, the doldrums, the blues
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Phrases

  • in the (or in no) mood for/to do something

    • Feeling (or not feeling) like doing or experiencing something.

      ‘she was in no mood for sightseeing’
      • ‘Laura scowled, this banter could go on for hours, and tonight she was in no mood for it, handling Ryan was enough for the time being.’
      • ‘The champions were in no mood to concede defeat at that stage.’
      • ‘I was in no mood to pursue the issue but the experience did leave a bad taste in my mouth.’
      • ‘They were in no mood to listen to my criticism of their performance.’
      • ‘Lieutenant Nemeck was not in a good mood, and in no mood to be made fun of by a junior.’
      • ‘This gave me some amount of satisfaction, but I was still unnerved that he stood in my house when it was clear I was in no mood for it.’
      • ‘He apologized profusely, but I was in no mood to listen.’
      • ‘Colleen usually would have laughed at that, but she was in no mood for it.’
      • ‘But then rain poured harder and the dancers seemed in no mood to continue dancing in the hot gymnasium.’
      • ‘After his experience in the beer hall, he was in no mood to disagree.’

Origin

Old English mōd (also in the senses ‘mind’ and ‘fierce courage’), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch moed and German Mut.

Pronunciation

mood

/muːd/

Main definitions of mood in English

: mood1mood2

mood2

noun

  • 1Grammar
    A category or form which indicates whether a verb expresses fact (indicative mood), command (imperative mood), question (interrogative mood), wish (optative mood), or conditionality (subjunctive mood).

    • ‘He wants to move the claim from the conditional to the indicative mood, as the grammarians would say.’
    • ‘If the verbs were in the indicative mood, we would expect she was coming in the first sentence, the chairman resigns in the second, and the lawsuit is dropped in the third.’
    • ‘If a regular pronoun and indicative mood are used, it shows that the speaker asserts that the report is true.’
    • ‘But the key point here is that it's the subjunctive mood, not the subjunctive case.’
    • ‘French also has the option of the embedded clause appearing in the subjunctive mood.’
  • 2Logic
    Any of the valid forms into which each of the figures of a categorical syllogism may occur.

Origin

Mid 16th century: variant of mode, influenced by mood.

Pronunciation

mood

/muːd/