Main definitions of molar in English

: molar1molar2molar3

molar1

(also molar tooth)

noun

  • A grinding tooth at the back of a mammal's mouth.

    • ‘In contrast to man, apes tend to have large incisor and canine teeth which are relatively larger than their molars.’
    • ‘All animals in this order lack incisor and canine teeth, but they may have numerous simple molars in the backs of their jaws.’
    • ‘At eighteen months, Monica has just this week cut two of her three emerging molars, which had been bulging and sore for weeks.’
    • ‘For years, our Scandinavian cousins put us to shame with their gleaming molars and incisors.’
    • ‘They may still require assistance in brushing their teeth - especially the back molars.’
    • ‘The molars' purpose is to grind food, and the incisors and canine teeth are used to bite into and tear food.’
    • ‘Gum disease can affect the first and second molars and the bone surrounding the tooth, as well as the impacted wisdom tooth.’
    • ‘The teeth most often missing are the third molars, second premolars, and maxillary lateral incisors, and other teeth may be reduced in size.’
    • ‘The location of early caries is found most often in children's maxillary incisors and first molars.’
    • ‘The first permanent molars stabilize the dental arch and have a great deal to do with the ultimate shape of the jaw and orderly arrangement of teeth.’
    • ‘The molars are stationary, that is, they don't show pattern of forward movement with aging that is seen in macropodids.’
    • ‘This wasn't entirely unexpected; she's cutting molars and we often have a few nights with some stirring when that's going on.’
    • ‘An examination of the mouth revealed molars that had broken off at the gum line.’
    • ‘The medical name for wisdom teeth is the third molars.’
    • ‘My teeth are as white as the moon, an orderly upper and lower row of molars and incisors with long, sharp fangs, on both the top and the bottom.’
    • ‘Three weeks after birth, pigs have their first deciduous molars in occlusion and show large and often clumsy jaw movements.’
    • ‘Year nine pupils are letting dentists examine their molars as part of a national review aimed at improving the nation's gnashers.’
    • ‘Each half of a manatee's jaw has five to eight molars which, unusually, are continuously replaced throughout its life.’
    • ‘Use a piece of unflavored, unwaxed dental floss and floss between your upper and lower back molars.’
    • ‘He's got a tooth, one of his molars, that's causing him a lot of pain and will probably need to be removed.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin molaris, from mola millstone.

Pronunciation:

molar

/ˈməʊlə/

Main definitions of molar in English

: molar1molar2molar3

molar2

adjective

  • Relating to mass; acting on or by means of large masses or units.

    • ‘He couldn't even find the molar mass of water.’
    • ‘The fetus was displaced toward the right by an enhancing cystic mass compatible with a molar pregnancy.’
    • ‘This demonstration exploits biophysical models of energy flux coupled with molar balance models of mass flux and GIS-based information on climate, topography, and vegetation.’
    • ‘A point in an absorption spectrum at which two or more components have the same molar magnetic susceptibility is termed an isosbestic point.’
    • ‘The experiments with the solids mostly involve oxidation reactions, measuring the water of hydration, and finding the molar mass by titration.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from Latin moles mass + -ar.

Pronunciation:

molar

/ˈməʊlə/

Main definitions of molar in English

: molar1molar2molar3

molar3

adjective

Chemistry
  • 1Relating to one mole of a substance.

    • ‘Both are acceptable in SI, but mg/l is a mass unit and mol/l a molar unit.’
    • ‘The enthalpy change that occurs during the complete combustion of one mole of a substance is called the molar heat of combustion, symbolized H c o.’
    • ‘Uncharged polar and even ionic dyes with substantial molar weights have often been used to trace apoplastic water movement.’
    • ‘Anaesthesia commences when any chemically indifferent substance has achieved a certain molar concentration in the lipoids of the cell.’
    • ‘Another substantial advantage is that volume fractions and molar concentrations are easily interconvertible, making comparison with experimental papers easier.’
    1. 1.1 (of a solution) containing one mole of solute per litre of solution.
      • ‘An example of this would be describing a solution as a 1 molar solution, or saying it had a strength of 1 M.’
      • ‘Tests demonstrate that the amount of available zinc is much higher in an herbal preparation than in an equal molar amount of zinc sulfate, and the clinical effects are noticeably greater.’
      • ‘In this case a solution that was 0.9 molar in trehalose and sucrose was examined for a sample at known spacing as described for water.’
      • ‘We carried out MD simulations for six different halothane/lipid molar concentrations ranging from 0: 512 to 512: 512.’
      • ‘The section on the interconversion of molal and molar solutions needs to be reworded.’

Pronunciation:

molar

/ˈməʊlə/