Main definitions of mogul in English

: mogul1mogul2Mogul3

mogul1

noun

  • 1informal An important or powerful person, especially in the film or media industry.

    ‘the Hollywood movie mogul, Sam Goldwyn’
    • ‘The choices initially appear strange - a legendary player alongside a media mogul - but both men revolutionised the sport.’
    • ‘Those attending range from software bosses, heads of government, business moguls, and even film stars and other celebrities.’
    • ‘Still and again, the days of huddling around the TV to receive a daily dose of mediated culture from the analog media moguls are numbered.’
    • ‘Where else would you find the top moguls in the media?’
    • ‘For while the record industry moguls have managed a small victory in the battle against ‘file sharing’, this is a war that cannot be won.’
    • ‘For a growing army of people - the players, the impresarios, the media moguls and, yes, the fans - it is much more important than that.’
    • ‘The organisers, three of New York's most powerful media moguls, were avoiding the obvious comparison.’
    • ‘Is there an industry mogul out there who can control him?’
    • ‘When you read memoirs written by politicians, media stars, business moguls or sporting heroes, you know that you are being told only what the writer wants you to hear.’
    • ‘Maybe this is to please their bosses; media moguls and their henchmen.’
    • ‘And it was not just the industrialists, bankers and media moguls who benefited.’
    • ‘Why are you down on all these big, powerful media moguls?’
    • ‘Perhaps it seemed routine for one of the world's most powerful media moguls to take a leadership post at one of the most influential think tanks in Washington.’
    • ‘The 9.9% stake held by the media mogul could be a stumbling block to any offer for the club as the shares were acquired at the top of the market.’
    • ‘It takes on corrupt media moguls, bloodthirsty generals and self-serving politicians, as well as an uncaring public.’
    • ‘A short film shot in Sligo will be screened for movie moguls from all over the world in Los Angeles later this month.’
    • ‘Thus the free flow of information falls victim to the commercial priorities of a media mogul.’
    • ‘Here the night will be boogied away by an A-list celebrity smorgasbord of movie stars, moguls, sports personalities and billionaires.’
    • ‘Millions of dollars are raised from developers, financial institutions, media moguls and a bevy of corporate heavy weights.’
    • ‘Hip hop artists have now morphed into businessmen and media moguls.’
    magnate, tycoon, vip, notable, notability, personage, baron, captain, king, lord, grandee, mandarin, nabob
    View synonyms
  • 2MogulA steam locomotive of 2-6-0 wheel arrangement.

    • ‘This stripped Mogul in the erecting shop is former SP No. 1771, a favorite of mine since childhood.’

Origin

Late 17th century: figurative use of Mogul.

Pronunciation

mogul

/ˈməʊɡ(ə)l/

Main definitions of mogul in English

: mogul1mogul2Mogul3

mogul2

noun

  • A bump on a ski slope formed by skiers turning.

    as modifier ‘a mogul field’
    • ‘Crashing through gates and bouncing over moguls, competitive skiers pound their knees mercilessly.’
    • ‘We shot down, hit a series of moguls, then lifted off.’
    • ‘This will teach your body to react to variable surfaces such as a mogul field on a ski run.’
    • ‘That, and that there was more to skiing than hammering moguls - that skiing had a technical side, and mileage was key.’
    • ‘Since then his life couldn't have been any more bumpy or gruelling had he set off down a mogul run on a tea tray.’
    • ‘Squats and lunges will help absorb and support the impact on the lower body used when skiing moguls and humps.’
    • ‘The condition of the pistes was exemplary, and once again there was the full range from motorway-like slopes for easy riding to treacherous mogul fields.’
    • ‘But because skiers have always dominated the bumps, we've also included what we think is the coolest mogul ski on the hill.’
    • ‘This cat track then empties out into another run that has lots of moguls (bumps or mounds of hard snow on a ski slope) and they were big ones!’
    • ‘Powder hounds won't be disappointed either as there are excellent off-piste skiing and mogul runs, but it's wise to ask for a guide if you take the uncharted option.’
    • ‘Remember that Olympic mogul skiers have the chance to ski year round and have been doing so for years!’
    • ‘Downhill skiing, especially on moguls, is to be avoided.’
    • ‘It starts with a steepish mogul field which, once conquered, boosts the confidence.’
    • ‘Improved balance keeps skiers tackling moguls and soccer players kicking forcefully.’
    • ‘So you've gone down enough moguls to last you a lifetime, and it's time to sit indoors, warm up in front of the fire and attract the ski bunnies at the chalet.’
    • ‘Whenever I made that correction I felt like I was lightly skimming over the mogul field.’
    • ‘Sunshine reflected off huge drifts, soft moguls and bumpy pistes.’
    • ‘She became the first Japanese woman to win a gold medal in the winter Olympics when she took the women's moguls event in freestyle skiing.’
    • ‘You can't help but get excited watching these guys fly through the air on a snowboard, jumping over moguls on a snow machine, or doing flips on a motorcycle.’

Origin

1960s: probably from southern German dialect Mugel, Mugl.

Pronunciation

mogul

/ˈməʊɡ(ə)l/

Main definitions of mogul in English

: mogul1mogul2Mogul3

Mogul3

(also Moghul, Mughal)

noun

  • 1A member of the Muslim dynasty of Mongol origin founded by the successors of Tamerlane, which ruled much of India from the 16th to the 19th century.

    as modifier ‘Mogul architecture’
    • ‘The Mughal emperor Akbar in 1587 won Kashmir and then it remained with Mughals till 1752, when Afghans won it.’
    • ‘Since the decline of the Gupta dynasty to the age of the Mughals, there was no central political authority through most of India.’
    • ‘The Moors took the Persian garden to Spain (the Alhambra), the Mughals took it to India (the Taj Mahal).’
    • ‘We have been ruled by the Mughals, the Sikhs and the Dogras.’
    • ‘The Mughals had vanquished the Hindu rulers who had flourished since the time of the Yadavas.’
    • ‘The Mughals of India were mighty rulers, for three centuries, especially in their golden days for six generations, from’
    • ‘The Muslim Mughals were always fearful of their Hindu subjects and could not rely on them to fight against European rivals, notably the British.’
    • ‘So, in India you first had the Rajas, then the Mughals came and finally the British.’
    • ‘The Mughals, who also ruled in Kabul, needed the pass and under Akbar ‘the Great’ a road was built.’
    • ‘Most supported the British and Mughals merely to keep themselves enthroned.’
    • ‘The Mughals are descendants of the greatest Muslim rulers of India, the Mughals and occupy third place.’
    • ‘Secondly the sultans put into place a system of administration - revenue collection, taxes and minting - that would serve as the base for their successors the Mughals.’
    • ‘The Mughals were Muslims who ruled a country with a large Hindu majority.’
    • ‘There were many contenders for the place vacated by the Mughals, but it was the British who ultimately emerged successful.’
    • ‘The Taj Mahal is the most beautiful monument built by the Mughals, the Muslim rulers of India.’
    • ‘In 1739, when Nadir Shah of Persia invaded India and captured Delhi, he got it from the Moghuls, and took with him to Persia.’
    • ‘Delicacies such as kebabs and curries that were introduced to royal courts by the Moghuls have now been woven into the local cuisine.’
    • ‘Perhaps the greatest of the Mughals was Akbar, who reigned from 1556 to 1605 and was able, through tolerance and generosity, to win over his Hindu subjects.’
    • ‘Yes, I am a successor of the great Mughals, but that does not make any difference to me.’
    • ‘Then followed the long rule of the Sultanate, the Mughals and then their decline.’
    1. 1.1historical The Mogul emperor of Delhi.
      • ‘A letter of his from the court of the Great Mogul is printed by Purchas, and this and another letter from the East are included in the compilation.’
      • ‘The representations of Jahangir, the Great Mogul, by English travellers, merchants, and diplomats who visited and resided in India in the early seventeenth century largely perpetuate this binary.’
      • ‘Gowing asked: ‘Are you a believer in the Great Mogul? ‘and then stood up.’’

Origin

From Persian muġul ‘Mongol’.

Pronunciation

Mogul

/ˈməʊɡ(ə)l/