Definition of moderation in English:



  • 1The avoidance of excess or extremes, especially in one's behaviour or political opinions.

    ‘he urged the police to show moderation’
    • ‘Given the enormous British tradition of restraint and moderation, that won't happen this time but a drastic response such as that will surely happen if such attacks continue.’
    • ‘Political pluralism also tends to exercise some moderation or restraint on unbridled nationalism.’
    • ‘We advocate that customers eat smart with balance, variety and moderation and go active with moderate exercise.’
    • ‘He identifies the four of the Athenian virtues: wisdom, courage, moderation, and justice.’
    • ‘Is there another group that seeks the path of rectitude and moderation with the same fervor?’
    • ‘They are encouraging young people to associate alcohol with excess and extreme moderation.’
    • ‘To some extent, it appears to function as a cautionary tale, preaching moderation: excess, it warns, finishes you off quicker than boredom.’
    • ‘I decided that with moderation, I could eat anything I wanted.’
    • ‘By ‘virtue’ they mean such moral virtues as justice, moderation, and courage.’
    • ‘As with all things in bodybuilding, the best way to achieve an extreme physique is through consistency and moderation.’
    • ‘Common sense, moderation and consistency are the foundations of a fit body and healthy nutrition.’
    • ‘It will only be cured when people re-discover the old-fashioned virtues of moderation, self-restraint, self-respect, neighbourliness, and a concern for others.’
    • ‘From the disease model point of view, moderation of addictive behavior is an unrealistic goal for a true addict.’
    • ‘He believed that one's guiding principle should be moderation for in the extremes resided the vices of excess and deficiency.’
    • ‘After a couple of nights of moderation, both in political tone and the orator, they're starting to take the gloves off tonight.’
    • ‘The County has a long tradition of political moderation with progressive attitudes toward culture, education and science.’
    • ‘That's what I favour - moderation and responsible behaviour.’
    • ‘No, it could be argued that when it comes to the national team we are guilty of the contrary virtues of patience, moderation, and restraint.’
    • ‘The antithesis of tyranny is justice and moderation and that of ignorance, knowledge and understanding.’
    • ‘It stresses the virtues of wisdom, justice, fortitude, and moderation.’
    self-restraint, restraint, self-control, self-discipline
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    1. 1.1The action of making something less extreme, intense, or violent.
      ‘the union's approach was based on increased dialogue and the moderation of demands’
      • ‘He said the combination of increased housing supply and easing economic growth ‘will see a moderation in the rate of price growth over the coming months’.’
      • ‘Significant cost reductions and a greater focus on wage moderation were necessary to protect jobs in the year ahead.’
      • ‘By contrast, German commitment to wage moderation has decreased its real exchange rate relative to Italy's by almost the same amount.’
      • ‘They're basically young toughs in these projects, and they're just not responding to any kind of calls for moderation to the violence, not even from their parents, by the way.’
      • ‘While that failure doesn't represent a major blow to the aim of seeking a moderation of greenhouse gas abatements strategy, it does represent a serious problem for Australian consumers.’
      • ‘A real decline in inflation would depend in the moderation of wage demands by ‘organised groups of workers’, indicated Government sources.’
      • ‘This moderation of tone is politically smart, I think.’
      • ‘Ireland needs to see significant and continuous cost reductions and wage moderation if we are to protect existing employment.’
      • ‘This is probably more precaution than I would take on my weblog, particularly the moderation of unregistered comments.’
      relaxation, reduction, abatement, weakening, slackening, diminution, diminishing, lessening, decrease, lightening, subsidence, contraction
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  • 2British The action or process of moderating examination papers, results, or candidates.

    ‘coursework may need to be filed separately for the purposes of moderation’
    • ‘They could have faced up to the fact that if one is to have a ranking-comparing examination or test, then one has to have some sort of moderation or scaling process.’
    • ‘The process of marking and moderation will be completed by Wednesday, October 6, 2004.’
    • ‘She wants them to look at the level of training, the quality of marking and the moderation of scripts.’
    • ‘The surprise is learning that even when a school's moderation process is proved faulty under the NCEA, students can still retain their inflated marks.’
    • ‘That was for production, printing, marking and moderation, not the fees schools pay.’
    • ‘Courses were run by the local centre, while university staff made regular visits for the purposes of moderation, invigilation and staff development.’
    1. 2.1The first public examination in some faculties for the BA degree at Oxford University.
      ‘he took firsts in classical honour Moderations’
      • ‘Born in Shipston-on-Stour, he was educated at Winchester and later went up to New College, Oxford, and obtained a first-class degree in Moderations.’
      • ‘Next year will see the examination timetable for Classics Moderations change considerably.’
      • ‘Every candidate who wishes to pass Law Moderations must offer Criminal Law and Constitutional Law and A Roman Introduction to Private Law.’
      • ‘This provides for candidates who have failed one or more papers in the new Moderations to enter for the Preliminary Examination.’
  • 3Physics
    The retardation of neutrons by a moderator.

    • ‘Soil water content was measured three times per week by neutron moderation method at 10, 20, 40, 60, and 80 cm depths.’
    • ‘The individual fibers absorb water, which can contribute to thermal moderation.’


Late Middle English: via Old French from Latin moderatio(n-), from the verb moderare to control (see moderate).