Definition of mistake in English:

mistake

noun

  • 1An act or judgement that is misguided or wrong:

    ‘coming here was a mistake’
    ‘she made the mistake of thinking they were important’
    • ‘We can't make the mistake of assuming that everything is within our grasp.’
    • ‘And it is only natural that we will make some mistakes along the way.’
    • ‘It seems that South Africa is condemned to repeat fatal mistakes that should have been learned from the past.’
    • ‘She made the mistake of looking back at him, urging her to stay.’
    • ‘He performed well overall but did make the expected rookie mistakes now and then.’
    • ‘You know, mistakes happen in journalism, as they happen in the military.’
    • ‘Avoid the common mistake of falling through the poles.’
    • ‘She makes the mistake of assuming that Americans can not stop eating when served a large portion.’
    • ‘The simple truth is that terrible mistakes have been made.’
    • ‘To suggest that embodied chemical properties can solve systemic institutional problems is to commit a serious category mistake.’
    • ‘Not making mistakes goes beyond turnovers, and the Colts simply made costly mistakes at the wrong times.’
    • ‘Sure, we made a few mistakes along the way, but everybody makes them.’
    • ‘People with great SAT scores go on to make the same stupid mistakes in their lives that we all make.’
    • ‘As soon as he said this he realized his grave mistake and quickly looked away.’
    • ‘Because if you make decisions without proper precautions, you're bound to make costly mistakes in life.’
    • ‘Historians sometimes make the mistake of thinking that early modern religious dissent argues secularization.’
    • ‘The danger in Iraq is repeating the biggest mistake - yielding to gradualism.’
    • ‘Samples are named, numbered and color-coded to make sure mistakes don't happen.’
    • ‘He warned that they should not make the mistake of believing that they could shelve their responsibility.’
    • ‘After a while I realized the fatal mistake I had made, but I didn't cry.’
    error, fault, inaccuracy, omission, slip, blunder, miscalculation, misunderstanding, flaw, oversight, misinterpretation, fallacy, gaffe, faux pas, solecism, misapprehension, misconception, misreading
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    1. 1.1 Something, especially a word, figure, or fact, which is not correct; an inaccuracy:
      ‘a couple of spelling mistakes’
      • ‘Also, that there are actually very few spelling mistakes, which is in itself a telling sign.’
      • ‘Feel free to let me know about all of my spelling and grammar mistakes below.’
      • ‘On your CV make sure everything is typographically perfect and that there are no spelling mistakes.’
      • ‘I don't want to see any more forgotten corners or misspelled words or mistakes!’
      • ‘The joined up hand-writing and lack of spelling mistakes gave the game away.’
      • ‘In closing, please ignore any spelling mistakes that may have slipped past.’
      • ‘I would be grateful if you would correct the mistakes in your article so your readers may not be misinformed.’
      • ‘He shook his head and went over to her computer, reading over what she had and correcting her mistakes.’
      • ‘Thanks for pointing out that I had some grammar mistakes!’
      • ‘The retyping explains the spelling, and also explains how a couple of spelling mistakes were introduced.’
      • ‘It gave the readers a chance to correct mistakes and add information.’
      • ‘Sorry I most likely do have quite a few grammar mistakes and so on.’
      • ‘It always helps to have someone point out where you've written gibberish and pluck out the spelling mistakes.’
      • ‘At more relaxed times we correct the grammar mistakes of political speeches.’
      • ‘Are you aware that you sometimes have spelling mistakes and grammatical errors in your posts?’
      • ‘One of them scored twice as much as the other for spelling, despite having made far more spelling mistakes.’
      • ‘And note that I corrected all the stupid spelling mistakes.’
      • ‘So what is proposed is that a spelling mistake is corrected.’
      • ‘I have just had a look at the lists again, and note that the same spelling mistakes are there.’
      • ‘I'll upload the photos and correct my spelling and grammar mistakes tomorrow.’
      misprint, printing error, printing mistake, typographical error, typographical mistake, typesetting error, typesetting mistake, keyboarding error, keyboarding mistake, keying error, keying mistake, typing error, typing mistake, corrigendum, erratum
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Be wrong about:

    ‘because I was inexperienced I mistook the nature of our relationship’
    • ‘The Tribunal mistook it, as I was directly responsible.’
    • ‘Well, often wildlife observers mistake what they are seeing.’
    • ‘The marshal mistook the message, thinking the emperor wanted to sweep the whole province.’
    • ‘But he later denied the reports, saying the media mistook his remarks in a meeting with the leader.’
    • ‘But to read for the lost arc is to mistake what this book is up to.’
    • ‘You were rude to him, and I do think you mistook his motives.’
    be wrong, be in error, be at fault, be under a misapprehension, be misinformed, be misguided, be wide of the mark, be barking up the wrong tree, get the wrong end of the stick
    misunderstand, misinterpret, get wrong, put a wrong interpretation on, misconstrue, misapprehend, misread, miss, take amiss
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    1. 1.1mistake someone/thing for Wrongly identify someone or something as:
      ‘she thought he'd mistaken her for Diana’
      • ‘We don't mistake it as a sign from God of an impending calamity.’
      • ‘Nothing untoward, though one hapless guest mistook the cart path across the golf course for the exit drive.’
      • ‘On the other front, Germans frequently mistook Soviet mortar barrages for aerial bombardments.’
      • ‘As I said above, people often mistake me for a 16 year old, even though I'm 25.’
      • ‘One describes how ill he felt when he mistook a large vat of gasoline for raspberry juice, guzzling the entire thing before making the realization.’
      • ‘If I had to go inside, people would easily mistake me for Nick.’
      • ‘I'm still sometimes mistaken for a student, so could I be next?’
      • ‘Schmidt apparently mistook ground fire for fire aimed at his flight leader.’
      • ‘Like the temperance movement, antiporn activism mistook a symptom of male dominance for the cause.’
      • ‘Mind you, people are often mistaking me for someone else.’
      • ‘A short woman in a baseball cap approaches me, apparently mistaking me for another snake aficionado.’
      • ‘We didn't always know where everyone else was, and sometimes mistook one another for the enemy.’
      • ‘Marine life sometimes mistake the bags for food and wind up choking to death.’
      • ‘He apparently mistook it for one near a Jewish cemetery not far away.’
      • ‘I just wanted to emphasize: don't mistake your cat for a dog.’
      • ‘We mistook the governments of the countries for the countries themselves.’
      • ‘And consequently, this is sometimes mistaken as not eating all that I should.’
      • ‘We'd talk for hours and I mistook this interest as genuinely concern, but then discovered she was also pregnant.’
      • ‘Survivorship bias involves mistaking what you see for what is really there.’
      • ‘People often mistook it for a girl's name.’
      confuse with, mix up with, take for, misinterpret as, confound with
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Phrases

  • and no mistake

    • informal Without any doubt:

      ‘it's a bad business and no mistake’
      • ‘I'll not be voting for him next month and no mistake.’
      • ‘It's beautifully filmed and no mistake, but it's got one of the most dreadful scripts in recent memory…’
      • ‘Our band of friends must cross the river to reach the object of their quest before the clocks strike midnight, else their lives will surely be over and no mistake.’
      • ‘With his open-neck shirt neatly tucked into belted trousers, he's old school South London and no mistake.’
      • ‘Gosh, that Kylie's a naughty one, and no mistake.’
      • ‘Still, my father was a bit of a dandy in his day and no mistake.’
      • ‘Sprinting end to end, leaping on and off the drum riser, throwing himself at the front rows and shaking the hand of everyone who's singing along, he's a real rock god tonight and no mistake.’
      • ‘Well, today's been a peculiar one, and no mistake.’
      • ‘It was a clever thing I did that day, and no mistake!’
      • ‘England will be going for the jugular and no mistake.’
  • by mistake

    • Accidentally; in error:

      ‘she'd left her purse at home by mistake’
      • ‘Unconfirmed reports last night suggested the double safety doors at the top and bottom of the tunnel were left open by mistake.’
      • ‘I have taped up the door so I don't forget and go in there by mistake.’
      • ‘I thought he was a local drunk who had wondered into the group by mistake, until I realised he was handing out leaflets.’
      • ‘Going home from work in Oxford last night I accidentally got on the Bristol train by mistake.’
      • ‘Those are the banned substances most frequently taken by mistake by players.’
      • ‘Officials in Australia admit the passports were returned by mistake.’
      • ‘Apparently the parcel wasn't for us, it was for a completely different house and he put the note through our door by mistake.’
      • ‘I left my stylus at the club by mistake, so I'll get the manager to drive around to your place and give it to you.’
      • ‘In other words, I accidentally clicked on it by mistake while pasting it in, before getting up to grab a book from a shelf.’
      • ‘I think my parents left the hospital with the wrong baby by mistake.’
      by accident, accidentally, inadvertently, unintentionally, unwittingly, unknowingly, unconsciously, by mistake, by chance, misguidedly
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  • make no mistake (about it)

    • informal Do not be deceived into thinking otherwise:

      ‘he's passionate about football, make no mistake’
      • ‘And they can be lethal, make no mistake about it.’
      • ‘But make no mistake about it, she's a world figure.’
      • ‘But make no mistake about it, we support Israel.’
      • ‘This is a serious football team and make no mistake about that!’
      • ‘And make no mistake about it, recruiting is tough duty.’
      • ‘Because if we have to adopt such tactics it can only have a negative effect on our own team preparation, and make no mistake about it, we have forwards that will also want the full width of this superb stadium.’
      • ‘Let's make no mistake about it - part of the ant-globalisation movement is resentment towards the United States, the world's hyper-power.’
      • ‘And make no mistake about it: They knew what they were doing.’
      • ‘And make no mistake about it, this nation is sad.’
      • ‘Second, of course, is the fact that - make no mistake about it and we certainly don't attempt to skirt the issue whatsoever - we are engaged in war.’
  • there is no mistaking ——

    • It is impossible not to recognize someone or something:

      ‘there's no mistaking that voice’
      ‘there was no mistaking her sincerity’
      • ‘But whatever the detail, there is no mistaking the fact that vodka is booze - hard liquor, as the Americans like to call it - that you drink for the effect rather than the taste.’
      • ‘I have never heard my grandfather's herald voice before, but there is no mistaking it.’
      • ‘The girls are not identical, but there is no mistaking them for twins with their similar frames and blonde hair.’
      • ‘For a manager charged with taking his team to the knockout stages of the Champions League, there is no mistaking the modesty of his resources, although there are those who would question his use of them.’
      • ‘But there is no mistaking her academic prowess now.’
      • ‘But, as she reads the Braille inscription on it there is no mistaking her pride.’
      • ‘They are few and small, only two inches in diameter, but there is no mistaking them.’
      • ‘Quaint, and sort of touristy as it may be, there is no mistaking it for anything but a railroad town.’
      • ‘It may be that he finds himself relying on his two most physical strikers, but there is no mistaking his desire to field a more creative talent.’
      • ‘At first glance, there is no mistaking the scenes are from some of the most famous movies in history.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as a verb): from Old Norse mistaka take in error, probably influenced in sense by Old French mesprendre.

Pronunciation

mistake

/mɪˈsteɪk/