Definition of misfortune in English:

misfortune

noun

  • 1[mass noun] Bad luck:

    ‘the project was dogged by misfortune’
    • ‘After our brief jaunt across campus, we made our way to our hotel, where misfortune struck once again.’
    • ‘It was almost a challenge, or perhaps even a test to see if misfortune had taught them anything.’
    • ‘For too long people in Scotland have tried to see Scottish misfortune as the consequence of being governed from London.’
    • ‘Not infrequently clubs are the architects of their own misfortune.’
    • ‘Wasn't she the one who unleashed all manner of misfortune upon the world?’
    • ‘The biggest lesson that he's taken almost five years to teach me is to overcome misfortune.’
    • ‘In Ireland, in particular, misfortune was frequently blamed on fairies as well as witches.’
    • ‘I have no doubt that there is a lesson which stands to be learnt from Alice's misfortune.’
    • ‘He must be somehow rejected in his own country and is now making everyone he meets pay for his misfortune.’
    • ‘The simple fact is these firms are businesses and they aren't in it for your benefit, they are in it to make money out of your misfortune.’
    • ‘It has been my great fate, or misfortune, to follow a speech more notable for its volume than for any sense.’
    • ‘I decided to be happy every day no matter what comes, discomfort or misfortune.’
    • ‘I lamented my misfortune in picking someone so completely incompatible and agonized for weeks.’
    • ‘And in just one respect, Britain was the architect of its own misfortune.’
    • ‘The lower gods can either assist people or bring misfortune to them.’
    • ‘But the following years bring misfortune more grievous than any in London.’
    • ‘In other words, they should not blame their misfortune on anybody else.’
    • ‘We feel deep sympathy for such children and lament their continuing misfortune.’
    • ‘You shouldn't be surprised that misfortune befalls noble men.’
    • ‘Normally I'm not this philosophical when it comes to personal misfortune.’
    1. 1.1[count noun] An unfortunate condition or event:
      ‘never laugh at other people's misfortunes’
      • ‘A series of misfortunes have struck the region at once, and the people effected can do little about it.’
      • ‘Even so, his words and evidence have been discredited in ways which make the public feel he might be responsible for his own misfortunes.’
      • ‘He wanted revenge on me, because he blamed his misfortunes on me.’
      • ‘Where is the incentive to act responsibly by trying to safeguard against the financial consequences of life's misfortunes?’
      • ‘The tour has been blighted by a string of misfortunes.’
      • ‘After a few times we spent together, she did mention her misfortunes in Brazil which made her stronger and live a happier life.’
      • ‘It makes the city look money-hungry and willing to profit from one of its citizen's misfortunes.’
      • ‘So how come such misfortunes have happened over and over again?’
      • ‘However, the latest misfortunes have befallen the Baltimore share price under his chairmanship.’
      • ‘Their sense of humour is unkind and they tend to enjoy other people's misfortunes.’
      • ‘I tried hard to overcome the great misfortunes that had befallen me and tried to finish my last days as a teacher with peace and faith in God.’
      • ‘The Cody Canal continued to suffer from bureaucratic failures and misfortunes.’
      • ‘They remain as the unobserved recipient of all these misfortunes.’
      • ‘He felt deeply the tragedies of the Palestinian people and their historic misfortunes.’
      • ‘Needless to say, losing one's source of income at a young age is a devastating personal misfortune.’
      • ‘People who use investment strategies that involve cheating or preying on the misfortunes of others are crooks.’
      • ‘It's very painful when we know people are laughing at our misfortunes, but it's wonderfully consoling when we see other people fall.’
      • ‘Sometimes we can be amused by the misfortunes of somebody else, but our amusement is particularly great if we are sure the loser is not really hurt.’
      • ‘Film producers tend to blame cable TV and video piracy for their misfortunes.’
      • ‘He is perennially dogged by comic mishaps and misfortunes, usually of his own making.’
      problem, difficulty, issue, trouble, setback, reverse, adversity, reverse of fortune, misadventure, mishap, stroke of bad luck, blow, failure, accident, disaster, tragedy, affliction, sorrow, misery, woe, trial, tribulation, catastrophe, calamity
      View synonyms

Pronunciation:

misfortune

/mɪsˈfɔːtʃuːn/