Definition of Minister of the Crown in English:

Minister of the Crown

noun

  • (in the UK and Canada) a member of the cabinet.

    • ‘The articles required the registered member to be a Minister of the Crown and put a mechanism in place to ensure that this remained the position.’
    • ‘So, in my respectful submission, your Honour has a substantial series of quotes, albeit they are in the form of hearsay and albeit it does come out of a newspaper, but made by a Minister of the Crown, who does not seek to correct them.’
    • ‘He is a Minister of the Crown, and that is what he said.’
    • ‘If any Minister of the Crown (or a Cabinet of Ministers) were to make a perverse decision, all of us would be goading on the victims to rush to get the decision quashed by the courts.’
    • ‘It is not just the Minister of the Crown that we are talking about.’
    • ‘Now, as a Minister of the Crown, he says the opposite.’
    • ‘As a Minister of the Crown, Belinda will be under a lot more scrutiny.’
    • ‘Under Standing Orders, any proposal affecting government expenditure or taxation may be moved only on the recommendation of a Minister of the Crown.’
    • ‘This House - and any self-respecting democracy - is able to hold any other Minister of the Crown to account.’
    • ‘When Ministers of the Crown give speeches surrounded by friends chortling away, the Minister must finally realise that no one takes him seriously.’
    • ‘What is it when a Minister of the Crown effectively says that this is not the end of it?’
    • ‘In the last half-hour two Ministers of the Crown have come down to an empty House and fessed up to having given incorrect answers in question time, when we had a very robust, packed House.’
    • ‘Surely it is almost impossible for a Minister of the Crown to act as a private individual in almost every circumstance.’
    • ‘A recommendation to a Minister of the Crown or to a central government department or organisation may only be overcome by Order in Council.’
    • ‘He is not all that high profile; he is just a Minister of the Crown.’
    • ‘What is the point in keeping a Minister of the Crown whose actions have been deliberate and deceitful, and whom the media and the public no longer trust?’
    • ‘We know that because Ministers of the Crown have told us today.’
    • ‘Yes, but Parliament has delegated that power to a Minister of the Crown.’
    • ‘Not only that, it is written in a way that carries a veiled threat from a Minister of the Crown to the Speaker.’
    • ‘So it's unwise, on the whole, for this foolish, relentless Minister of the Crown to persecute them further.’