Definition of mingle in English:

mingle

verb

  • 1Mix or cause to mix together.

    no object ‘the sound of voices mingled with a scraping of chairs’
    with object ‘a smell which mingled disinfectant and soap’
    • ‘I took it, but my relief was mingled with insensible annoyance at the trifling penalty.’
    • ‘Everything emitted a mouldy odour, mingled with the smell of mothballs.’
    • ‘Their reaction, I'd guess, was a touch of awe mingled with the instant lift we all felt the moment we entered this space.’
    • ‘Their laughters are mingled with the roaring sound of the mighty waves, which are much too eager to devour their easy preys.’
    • ‘These trivial disputes mingled with hatred and love can become especially complex, requiring a lot of patience.’
    • ‘I sweat like a racehorse, and very dark thoughts mingled with incapacitating spasms of pain.’
    • ‘These migmatite complexes were mingled with the intrusive magmas that provided the heat sources for crustal melting.’
    • ‘The tunnel was a bright yellow but it was mingled with a dark maroon like color.’
    • ‘The smell of burning flesh mingled with that of cigarette and sage smoke.’
    • ‘The smell of the damp wood smoke mingled with the rising smells of the wet trees and forest floor, and it was rich and pleasant to the nose, full of Spring and new life.’
    • ‘Could it not be the case that my anger was also mingled with feelings of jealousy, rivalry or envy?’
    • ‘His tone was mingled with a tone of slight regret and sadness.’
    • ‘For them celebration of her achievement is always mingled with recollections of their loss.’
    • ‘The last years of Augustine's life were devoted to sharp exchanges with him, in which fair comment was mingled with vulgar abuse.’
    • ‘I could smell my cousin's perfume mingled with sweat and hear her labored breaths.’
    • ‘The smell of burning oil and steaming jungle mingled with the blood in Jim's nose.’
    • ‘Now when she felt his presence there she felt sad but this time it was mingled with this peace and calm.’
    • ‘It is particularly spectacular when they are mingled with your Christmas lights.’
    • ‘There was relief mingled with pride in a South Lakeland village this week as its public toilet was reopened thanks to people power.’
    • ‘The taste of the Glen Livet he had been drinking mingled with the taste of her champagne.’
    mix, blend, intermingle, commingle, intermix, interweave, interlace, combine, merge, fuse, unite, join, amalgamate, meld, marry, mesh, compound, coalesce, interblend
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1no object Move among and engage with others at a social function.
      ‘a chance to mingle with celebs’
      • ‘So one positive side of my dethronement is the fact that I can now mingle with the masses, thanks to my newfound freedom.’
      • ‘Not only is the business doing well but Gary also gets the opportunity to mingle with some of sports biggest personalities.’
      • ‘Kim, who had 19 top 40 hits including Kids in America, cut the ribbon and mingled with shoppers on Saturday.’
      • ‘She was unable to mingle with other students especially when they formed groups.’
      • ‘Having satisfied our hunger, we decided to mingle with the people we knew and endeavour to find out who were those we didn't know.’
      • ‘Five lucky kids who vote will get the chance of a lifetime to mingle with the stars and give away an award at the TV event.’
      • ‘The buffet was open and stars mingled with the riffraff.’
      • ‘For those who love to mingle with the young and the old alike and serve with a smile, this is a good opening.’
      • ‘In the last leg of her campaign in Rae Bareli and Sultanpur areas, she broke the security ring and freely mingled with the crowd.’
      • ‘Bob got a chance to mingle with the ladies, and even got a bit of advice from his mom who made a surprise appearance.’
      • ‘What makes this place different is you can mingle with the artists.’
      • ‘It is one of the oldest pubs in the country and a favourite haunt of the rich and famous who mingle with the locals over a pint - or a royal gin and tonic.’
      • ‘You need never mingle with your fellow guests - your walled pavilion is its own private domain for inside and outside living.’
      • ‘Figures from the past, such as Ann, come to mingle with the family again.’
      • ‘For women, one of the rules is that she must not mingle with women she does not know.’
      • ‘I can understand why some of the other guests from the community were invited to mingle with students.’
      • ‘He also mingled with the children and joined them in the singing of carols and other Christmas songs.’
      • ‘Perhaps you, inexplicably, don't mingle with people who watch kids' TV.’
      • ‘Prior to the meal and his after-dinner speech, he will sign copies of the novel and mingle with guests.’
      • ‘But Reagan was not one to mix and mingle with reporters of the White House Press Corps.’
      socialize, circulate, fraternize, associate with others, rub shoulders, get together, consort with others
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: frequentative of obsolete meng ‘mix or blend’ (related to among), perhaps influenced by Middle Dutch mengelen.

Pronunciation

mingle

/ˈmɪŋɡ(ə)l/