Definition of mince in English:

mince

verb

  • 1often as adjective mincedwith object Cut up (food, especially meat) into very small pieces, typically in a machine.

    ‘minced beef’
    • ‘And if you've ever tasted one of my tuna, pasta, vinegar, lemon, sweetcorn, chile, minced beef dishes, you'd be terrified at the idea.’
    • ‘More filling are the Buffalo Chicken Wings with hot garlic sauce and Nakamura's Half Moon, which has minced vegetables in seasoning.’
    • ‘A typical example is minced beef cobbler, braised lambs' liver and onions, stuffed tomatoes, seafood flan salad or mixed side salad - all at a reasonable price.’
    • ‘He minced some garlic by hand and scraped it in, added the lime juice, and puréed the concoction until it was a thin soup.’
    • ‘Finely chop the onion, mince the garlic and put these in a large bowl with the lemon juice and oil.’
    • ‘The meat was finely minced and flavored with cloves and bits of roasted pear, and when you mashed it up, it tasted like a sweet, exotic version of shepherd's pie.’
    • ‘Heat the butter in a pan and fry the finely minced onion to a light brown.’
    • ‘Combine ground beef, minced garlic and 1/2 teaspoon pepper in large bowl, mixing lightly but thoroughly.’
    • ‘Today, its crisped edges are soggy, and its corn, cheddar and minced fresh herbs are dry.’
    • ‘A trace of this practice survives in the serving of toast fingers with plain cooked minced meat, an adaptation made to the original dish in the 18th century.’
    • ‘The potatoes are minced and mixed with chocolate.’
    • ‘I tried a coconut milk concoction called ‘Thai fire’ and a simple mixture of oil and minced garlic.’
    • ‘I sliced bread, chopped celery and carrots, and minced sausage.’
    • ‘It can be cooked and served cold in sauce or stir-fried with pepper oil and minced spring onion with a weak fragrance of the buckwheat.’
    • ‘Poultry, sausages and chopped or minced meat must always be thoroughly cooked.’
    • ‘Tim dices the chicken, minces the onion, grates the ginger and mixes the meat with the spice and yogurt mixture.’
    • ‘Mix together with a dash of lemon juice, plenty of salt to taste, a generous shake of dried red chili flakes and a finely minced green onion.’
    • ‘She said: ‘I was in the kitchen mincing some meat when I heard this terrific bang.’’
    • ‘Add the mustard, minced lemon, caper mix, and parsley and pulse to combine.’
    • ‘Tip into a bowl and mix in the lemon zest, chopped herbs, minced veal, salt and freshly ground black pepper.’
    chop up, cut up, chop into small pieces, cut into small pieces
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  • 2no object Walk with short quick steps in an affectedly dainty manner.

    ‘there were plenty of secretaries mincing about’
    • ‘And's that pink nylon flippy wig just for morning lectures, or are you mincing around in it because it's pretty?’
    • ‘Under his critical gaze I manage to avoid mincing, but end up walking with a pronounced limp and a crooked back, instead - Mother Hubbard crossed with an out-of-condition baby elephant.’
    • ‘Yeah, it's about time rock started to embrace its feminine side - will we ever see a rock star happy to wear a boa or make-up, or perhaps mince about the stage in a catsuit?’
    • ‘She minces about, feverishly waving wands and batons (the child, not ‘Turtle’) at the crowd, then suddenly our eyes meet.’
    • ‘Athletics, on the other hand, was an excuse to mince around a field in a vest and carry out a bunch of pointless exercises.’
    • ‘In addition to tall and slim models mincing along the cat-walk, one occasionally sees a dozen or so women in their 50s and even 60s clothed in their best twisting their bodies on stage.’
    • ‘And he minces; he takes short, feline, footsteps.’
    • ‘‘Rick was in a trio called The Highlights and he used to mince about on stage,’ explained Francis.’
    • ‘I was troubled at first by the gay stereotype played by Neil Napier (he lisps, he minces, he wears pink), but then I remembered that everyone on stage is a caricature to some degree.’
    • ‘Whenever Clarence the angel talks longingly about getting his wings, take a shot of bourbon and then mince around the room, flapping your arms as feyly as possible.’
    • ‘I mean, if you were banking 40 grand or more a week, and had a copious amount of free time on your hands, there are surely a million more imaginative ways to spend your time than mincing around celeb-studded night clubs in your Gucci threads!’
    • ‘Which is apparently why, on a chilly autumnal afternoon, I am mincing through a dappled forest clearing with no shoes or socks on.’
    • ‘It's her movie without a doubt and the script is fine-tuned to showcase her comic talents (not to mention her deportment, decorum and the ability to mince around wearing kitten heels and a bikini).’
    • ‘Truman Capote may have been the only man who could mince while slouching; that takes exceptional skill.’
    • ‘The concept was ‘Stars’, and a range of lookie-likies (read wannabes) were mincing around in the crowd.’
    • ‘Tibetan society is charming but conservative, and the thought of Tibetan hotties mincing down the catwalk in their skimp challenged all credibility.’
    • ‘I knew I didn't mince or anything, but I really didn't think I swaggered.’
    • ‘Echo soon returned mincing over the gravel, holding her footprinted parchment, saying, ‘Wow!’’
    • ‘Green plays softball with James's affectations, while Culkin minces through a selection of costume changes.’
    • ‘Within a few blocks my feet were sliding back and forth inside my sandals, which made it difficult to walk without seeming to mince.’
    affected, fastidious, dainty, effeminate, niminy-piminy, chichi, foppish, dandyish
    walk affectedly, walk in an affected way, walk in an dainty way, teeter, waddle, skip
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noun

mass nounBritish
  • Minced meat, especially beef.

    ‘stir in the mince and fry until browned’
    • ‘This is what the guests found: meatballs about the diameter of £2 coins made of lamb, beef and pork mince, with bowls of quite peppery tomato sauce.’
    • ‘Try some veggie recipes and instead of mince use soya meat instead, you will not know the difference.’
    • ‘In some places hummus is topped with cooked lamb mince, which is utterly delicious - though mutton is often used instead, and to the uninitiated this can be a rather strong flavour.’
    • ‘St Aidan's High School, which introduced a pioneering project to serve fresh school dinners from its own kitchen, served organic mince for the first time to mark the event.’
    • ‘Mind you, I'm very good at steak, and my mince with mash is unbeatable.’
    • ‘Try cutting back on the amount you eat per meal and have good meat more often, instead of 5 days of mince and sausages, fill up on veggies and when you eat meat, eat good stuff.’
    • ‘My recipe today is for Keema - curried mince (ground beef).’
    • ‘A special kind of preserved beef mince, spiced and salted, is known as sassermaet and is the basis for making the patties which are called brönies.’
    • ‘Looks a great colour in the pan, tastes of proper beef, lovely coarse mince.’
    • ‘As versatile as a pound of mince, it is also one of the easiest meats to cook.’
    • ‘Add the cooked mince to the mixture together with seasoning, 1 small egg, beaten, and 25g flour, mix thoroughly.’
    • ‘I like to use lean beef mince from the supermarket.’
    • ‘I did manage to get a pack of Heritage premium pork sausages half price, at 82p, and 500g of lean beef mince for £2.69.’
    • ‘I get my steaks, and pick up a couple of lamb chops, a pork belly and some mince.’
    • ‘Let's face it, beef mince especially, is the worst quality meat product that is allowed to be sold.’
    • ‘Spread up the sides of the moulds and make a hollow and then fill with cooked mince, top with the crumb mixture and bake in a low oven to warm through.’
    • ‘Repeat with the second batch of mince and place in the colander.’
    • ‘Place pork mince in a bowl and add chopped olives.’
    • ‘The potatoes are boiling, the simmering mince smells like proper home cooking.’
    • ‘Sausage rolls would go down well, especially if the filling was a bit special, perhaps good sausage mince mixed with game or venison.’

Phrases

  • mince matters

    • dated usually with negativeUse polite or moderate expressions to indicate disapproval.

      ‘I hope she and her colleagues won't mince matters’
      • ‘He was not one to mince matters, nor did he wrap up inconvenient topics in persiflage.’
      • ‘You must forsake all that, young man, or old man either; it is no use mincing matters with you.’
      • ‘Many thoughtful men heard you and have not minced matters in their open approbation of your sermon.’
      • ‘The Hadis has not minced matters, but divulged the supreme mission of Islam with absolute frankness.’
      • ‘Father Ton is a unique personality who in forthright conversations does not mince matters.’
  • not mince words (or one's words)

    • Voice one's disapproval candidly and directly.

      ‘his doctorly persona is that of a gruff surgeon who does not mince words’
      • ‘He doesn't mince words, making it clear that Catholics should believe in what is now called ‘intelligent design’.’
      • ‘Pick an issue, she's got an opinion and she doesn't mince words.’
      • ‘The former IPS officer doesn't mince words even when talking about the police force of which he was an integral part for more than three decades.’
      • ‘When asked why there are so few players from the region playing in top European clubs, he doesn't mince his words.’
      • ‘For all his courtesy, he doesn't mince words over political differences between the two countries.’
      • ‘The straight-taking Murphy doesn't mince his words and makes no secret of his reservations about the prospects of soccer and rugby being played at G.A.A. headquarters.’
      • ‘Multi-instrumentalist and vocalist Samantha Parton doesn't mince words when explaining why the Be Good Tanyas are attracted to traditional roots music.’
      • ‘Dr. Kaufman doesn't mince words: ‘As a general rule, this stuff works.’’
      • ‘The Scottish music mogul who discovered Oasis certainly doesn't mince his words - and there's definitely no sign of corporate-speak such as ‘synergies’ or ‘shareholder value’.’
      • ‘He doesn't mince words, and he is able to talk about this in layman's terms that everyone can understand.’
      talk straight, not beat about the bush, call a spade a spade, speak straight from the shoulder, pull no punches, make no bones about something, get to the point
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French mincier, based on Latin minutia ‘smallness’.

Pronunciation

mince

/mɪns/