Definition of microscope in English:

microscope

noun

  • An optical instrument used for viewing very small objects, such as mineral samples or animal or plant cells, typically magnified several hundred times.

    • ‘Photographs were taken after dissection using a microscope at a magnification of 64x.’
    • ‘A biopsy allows scientists to look at a sample of your cells under a microscope and carry out tests on the tissue.’
    • ‘Currently available manual assays rely on microscopes (optical or fluorescence).’
    • ‘In rapid succession the field ion microscope and the scanning tunnelling microscope soon joined these microscopes.’
    • ‘The lengths were measured with an ocular micrometer fitted to the eyepiece of the microscope.’
    • ‘They therefore resolve images at much higher magnifications than can light microscopes.’
    • ‘She had spent weeks hunched over a microscope looking at samples of sperm.’
    • ‘The sample is then sent to a laboratory to be looked at under a microscope for signs of cell change.’
    • ‘We know that looking for abnormal cells down a microscope is not an exact science, and that is the problem.’
    • ‘Instead, the abundance of leaf hairs on leaf surfaces or veins was scored for each sample under a light microscope.’
    • ‘Biosensors, such as patch clamps, electrodes, or microscopes are positioned to detect a response from the cell.’
    • ‘Optical inspection microscopes provide test capabilities for both masks and wafers at several different stages of the printing process.’
    • ‘He used a simple microscope, although compound microscopes were available at the time.’
    • ‘This simple approach recognises the fact that mycobacterial culture is not feasible in peripheral units but that light microscopes and trained microscopy staff are available.’
    • ‘A pathologist will examine the prostate sample under a microscope and check whether or not it is cancerous.’
    • ‘Measurements were made using a light microscope equipped with an eyepiece micrometer.’
    • ‘These research microscopes often have binocular eyepieces, relying upon a series of prisms to split the image so that it may be viewed with both eyes.’
    • ‘Light microscopes can magnify objects up to 1,000 times, revealing microscopic details.’
    • ‘The paper shows that positrons can see defects better than either optical or electron beam microscopes.’
    • ‘We had a lab to do that day, something to do with plants and microscopes and osmosis.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from modern Latin microscopium (see micro-, -scope).

Pronunciation:

microscope

/ˈmʌɪkrəskəʊp/