Main definitions of mickey in English

: mickey1mickey2mickey3

mickey1

(also mick, micky)

noun

British
informal
  • Tease or ridicule someone.

    ‘they would take the mickey out of me with sickening enthusiasm’
    • ‘It's a joke; you fool about; they take the mickey out of you and it's fun.’
    • ‘‘I remember the professionals laughing and taking the mickey,’ he recalls.’
    • ‘I've already had one busy weekend with them and they're taking the mickey out of me, which is a good sign.’
    • ‘I accept that if you go back a few years there were individuals effectively taking the mickey of the ill-health process, and I agree that there should be more stringent measures applied now to ensure that genuine people go.’
    • ‘You had to try and block your mind off from what they were talking about because they were laughing and joking and taking the mickey out of me.’
    • ‘The other lads took the mickey out of me because I spent my 21st birthday on patrol.’
    • ‘My fiancée's mother works at police headquarters and she has been taking the mickey out of me.’
    • ‘My other half has started taking the mickey out of my taste in TV programmes, noting that all I watch are ‘Long Ago’ documentaries.’
    • ‘I do understand that it can be difficult dealing with male colleagues, especially if they are accustomed to mucking about and taking the mickey out of each other.’
    • ‘I wasn't really sure if I was taking the mickey out of her, or she was taking the mickey out of me!’
    • ‘Watson says the band took the mickey out of people who took themselves too seriously.’
    • ‘I was terrified he might turn on me, and he soon did, calling me ‘Miss Prim’ and ‘Miss Powell’ and taking the mickey out of my clothes and accent.’
    • ‘‘I used to stick up for her at school and in the town when people took the mickey out of her,’ said 17-year-old Debbie.’
    • ‘They liked irreverence, taking the mickey, politically incorrect humour, mockery, satire.’
    • ‘A PUB landlord took the mickey out of his MP neighbour's opposition to wind farms by erecting a mini-turbine in his back yard.’
    • ‘If you haven't seen the show you may not know the attitude, so I should point out that the whole thing is taking the mickey out of the reporting methods of the major news channels, with a fair bit of commentary.’
    • ‘So compulsive were his sketches, in which he mercilessly took the mickey out of his erstwhile colleagues, that at the age of 53 his public profile is higher than that of almost anyone in the shadow cabinet.’
    • ‘My family and most of my friends have been taking the mickey, but it is only because they don't know enough about the sport.’
    • ‘His capacity for taking the mickey out of defences was also legendary even though he could be diffident in front of goal in a way that Finney would have found unnatural.’
    • ‘The others love taking the mickey out of my accent, but they are a cracking set of lads, and from day one made me feel very welcome.’
    mockery, derision, laughter, scorn, scoffing, contempt, jeering, sneering, sneers, jibes, jibing, joking, teasing, taunts, taunting, ragging, chaffing, twitting, raillery, sarcasm, satire, lampoon, burlesque, caricature, parody
    View synonyms

Origin

1950s: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

mickey

/ˈmɪki/

Main definitions of mickey in English

: mickey1mickey2mickey3

mickey2

noun

informal
  • ‘I bet some guy slipped me a mickey’
    short for mickey finn
    • ‘And when I saw this hottie bit of hand leaning on the bar I slipped myself a mickey, and the next thing I know I was taking myself back to my place.’
    • ‘Somebody slips me a mickey in the pub and I become a demon who thinks he's talking totally normally to people, but in fact it is all a grotesque noise.’
    • ‘Do this for a couple of nights, and you may think someone slipped you a Viagra micky.’
    • ‘Greta here slipped me a mickey one night, and here I am.’
    • ‘That mickey I was slipped stole a month of my life, and I'm not happy.’
    • ‘Doctors told her she was drugged but did not know what with, and Stasi has no idea who might have slipped her the mickey or why.’
    • ‘In greedy desperation, Oberon plans to distract Titania by having his impish henchman Puck (the hirsute Stanley Tucci) slip her a mickey, causing her to fall in love with something repulsive.’
    • ‘I couldn't believe it this morning when I read it in the paper and all the radio stations, I thought I must have dreamt this, and who's dropped a mickey in my drink last night?’
    • ‘As a direct result, a jaded criminal leaps from the back seat and slips a mickey into their beer while distracting them with a riveting game of chance.’
    • ‘Presumably, now that one can just buy them a damn beer instead of sneaking them a mickey, they should be able to get a record review that isn't prefaced with the critic's incredulity that such young'uns should be so focused.’
    • ‘The first five tracks sparkle with second-hand guitar lines from all three EPs, but with the welcome break of ‘A Cathedral at Night,’ My Favorite slips you a micky on the sly.’
    • ‘Trust means never having to slip a mickey to your mate.’
    • ‘I should have slipped you some cyanide not a mickey.’
    • ‘It had been so easy for Nick to slip a mickey into Jessie's drink.’

Pronunciation:

mickey

/ˈmɪki/

Main definitions of mickey in English

: mickey1mickey2mickey3

mickey3

noun

Irish
informal
  • A man's penis.

    • ‘The fella beside me says she's got it wrong about the feet, sure she has, the mickey dies first and everything else follows.’
    • ‘I told him it was simple: you have to show your mickey.’

Origin

Early 20th century: pet form of the given name Michael.

Pronunciation:

mickey

/ˈmɪki/