Main definitions of metre in English

: metre1metre2

metre1

(US meter) (also m)

noun

  • 1The fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100 centimetres or approximately 39.37 inches.

    ‘sit two metres away from the TV screen’
    ‘the wall was less than a metre high’
    • ‘Rates of sedimentation may range from a few centimetres to about a metre per thousand years.’
    • ‘You don't get there any quicker by being 20 centimetres rather than 20 metres from the vehicle in front.’
    • ‘For example, a centimeter is 1/100 of a meter, while a kilometer is 1,000 meters in length.’
    • ‘One indexing line on the disk equals one centimeter deviation at 100 meters.’
    • ‘A wide selection of these species is usually caught by traditional fisheries, including both large and small species, varying from five centimeters up to one meter in length.’
    • ‘The oddest thing was losing the feet and inches and changing to metres and centimetres.’
    • ‘The sari is a length of cloth measuring from about four to eight metres by about 120 centimetres.’
    • ‘The material's specific surface area of a few hundred square meters per cubic centimeter corresponds to about a thousand times that of a polished silicon wafer.’
    • ‘The one we found was at a depth of 1.12 metres and measures 3.8 centimetres in length.’
    • ‘The plants ranged in height from five centimetres to over a metre.’
    • ‘Aquarius sits approximately 15 meters under the sea, where the pressure on divers is 2.5 times what we experience on land.’
    • ‘He says such a pen is just two metres long by 60 centimetres wide, with a concrete floor and no bedding.’
    • ‘Thus, as found in several other systems, availability of alternative foods for mice often shows noticeable changes at the scale of few meters and even centimeters.’
    • ‘They range in size from a few centimeters to a meter or more in greatest dimension (commonly between 30 and 60 cm).’
    • ‘Individual coal balls range from a few centimetres to over a metre in length.’
    • ‘This work offers the potential to shrink accelerators from miles to meters in length and open a range of new applications, from medicine to high-energy physics.’
    • ‘The total length of the cycle path will be approximately 900 metres.’
    • ‘Squid come in all sizes, from a centimetre to over a metre in length, and the life cycles of different species vary greatly.’
    • ‘There are 100 centimeters in a meter, and 1,000 meters in a kilometer.’
    • ‘In all, the fireguard stretches seven kilometres, and is approximately 400 meters wide.’
    1. 1.1— metres A race over a specified number of metres.
      ‘the 200 metres’
      • ‘It was only after several weeks of torment that she committed to the 800 metres as well.’
      • ‘Dreschler secured a new world record in the 200 metres and also took gold in the long jump.’
      • ‘Jerome Young ran a very evenly paced race in the 400 metres final - and that was the secret to his victory.’
      • ‘In Atlanta, four years earlier, she had run in the 5,000 metres and was fifth.’
      • ‘Milkha Singh had beaten Abdul Khaliq, in their first encounter, in the 200 metres race.’
      • ‘The title of women's world 100 and 200 metres champion is turning out to be a poisoned chalice.’
      • ‘A second 400 metres gold in 2000 made him the only man to win the event in consecutive Games.’
      • ‘Winner of the boys' 90 metres handicap race was eight-year-old Macaulay Dixon from Ulverston.’
      • ‘Vincent Flannery ran a very good 1500 metres race to finish fourth in the V3 section.’
      • ‘The shame is that he could not be at his best for the 400 metres, which has always been one his strongest events.’
      • ‘Ian Thorpe will race the 400 metres freestyle in Athens, as expected.’
      • ‘Even that looks beyond Campbell in the 100 or 200 metres, based on his form this season.’
      • ‘The concern is that five races before the 1,500 metres final may take the edge off Holmes.’
      • ‘Kelly Holmes is the Olympic 800 metres champion after her dramatic win in the final tonight.’

Origin

Late 18th century: from French mètre, from Greek metron ‘measure’.

Pronunciation

metre

/ˈmiːtə/

Main definitions of metre in English

: metre1metre2

metre2

(US meter)

noun

  • 1The rhythm of a piece of poetry, determined by the number and length of feet in a line.

    ‘the Horatian ode has an intricate governing metre’
    mass noun ‘unexpected changes of stress and metre’
    • ‘Skelton used the octosyllabic metre, and a rough manner which was to be paralleled in later times by Butler in Hudibras, and by Swift.’
    • ‘Poets turned to the syllabic meters of folk poetry, and the old Osmanli literary style gave way to the more direct language characteristic of most Western poetry.’
    • ‘The six verses of the excerpt are eleven to fifteen syllables long and cannot, therefore, be classified as a specific meter within Italian poetry.’
    • ‘We can deduce the stress pattern of a word from the metre of a line.’
    • ‘You are constrained by a specific meter, a specific rhyme scheme, and a specific length.’
    • ‘So do dactyls, and neither of these meters is particularly associated with subtlety, but Finch sets out to change that.’
    • ‘The meter and rhyme schemes of the Crepusculars were less regular than Italian poets formerly had employed, and so their work was an important stage in the move toward vers libre in Italy.’
    • ‘It's not just any kind of poetry, but strictly traditional poetic forms like sonnets and sestinas - the kind that rhymes and has a formal meter.’
    • ‘Significantly both these phrases stand out as exceptions to the anapaestic metre.’
    • ‘In your laundry list of fancy poetry words the ‘other one’ of the metres would be a dactyl.’
    • ‘Hexameters are the epic meter; by stealing a foot in the second line, Cupid has turned it into elegiac meter, used for love poetry.’
    • ‘This form of poetry comprising more than a dozen couplets in the same metre has come a long way and so have ghazal singers.’
    • ‘Promoted by the fascist Ezra Pound, this new poetry without meter or rhyme swept literary Europe and America in the period leading up to the war.’
    • ‘For in addition to these more typical forms one finds catalogued in EV an amazing variety of stanzaic forms, line lengths, meters, and rhyme schemes.’
    • ‘Form poems are also noted for their traditional use of rhyme, metre and stanza.’
    • ‘Students composed alone in the dark on allotted subjects and in given metres, reciting their verses in public performance.’
    • ‘He was able to do without conventional metres, rhymes and stanzas because he had made his own tools.’
    • ‘The rest of the rhymes are embedded in the middle of lines whose meter becomes erratic.’
    • ‘His first works are called the Eclogues, a collection of pastoral poetry done in the same meter as the Aeneid (dactylic hexameter).’
    • ‘Nevertheless, the line lengths and meter can become predictable.’
    yardstick, test, standard, norm, barometer, touchstone, litmus test, criterion, benchmark
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The basic rhythmic pattern of beats in a piece of music.
      ‘a dance song in fast quadratic metre’
      ‘Prokofiev's complex metres’
      • ‘Often the meter seems to fluctuate between triple and duple time, which transforms the rhythmic emphases of the loops.’
      • ‘A CD with performances of many songs and chants in a wide variety of tonalities and meters accompanies the book.’
      • ‘At first the cymbals merely kept time with the meter of the mantras, but soon the conch-blowers and trumpeters struck up too, and the band was joined by four priestly drummers each holding a tall wooden tabla.’
      • ‘Rhythm patterns always are taught with musical inflection to aid in the audiation of meter and so students learn that music always is performed musically.’
      • ‘This was rhythm, a voice singing over the reliability of the metronome piano beat, the metre.’
      • ‘The simple melody derived from a pentatonic scale and the prevailing dotted rhythm in compound duple meter elicit the feeling of a slow, graceful Korean traditional dance.’
      • ‘Huang also includes cross-rhythms, syncopated rhythms and an array of standard meters.’
      • ‘Binary and ternary time signatures, combinations and complex meters are covered within the goal, practice and custom modes of operation.’
      • ‘In the key of A minor, this lively marching tune in triple meter uses only two fingers in the right hand and four in the left.’
      • ‘He often created large-scale pieces by bringing back the same blocks of material, and varied their meter to give more variety.’
      • ‘Once students can associate the syllables, they would need additional practice recognizing the tonality or meter of familiar music.’
      • ‘They then established a congruence between long and short syllables and patterns of long and short time-units in the musical meters of the period.’
      • ‘The first piece, Valse Noble, is a work in triple meter.’
      • ‘A developmental psychologist would likely say that the resonance of a particular meter or beat or note-combination sends the baby into fits of laughter.’
      • ‘Gerber's handling of rhythm especially impresses me, with a mastery of the phrase against the meter.’
      • ‘A good CD to use is Music for Movement, which features short instrumental examples in various meters and tempi.’
      • ‘Also difficult is the changing metric structure and the note patterns that do not jive with the meter of the moment.’
      • ‘While difficult to count, the symmetry of the phrases grounds students in the meter of the piece, allowing them to solve the challenges in listening, counting and texture.’
      • ‘The second movement is polyrhythmic counterpoint in mixed meters.’
      • ‘The meter, complexity of rhythms created by dotted rhythms, triplets and irregular accents manifest the spirit of Korean peasant dance and music.’

Origin

Old English, reinforced in Middle English by Old French metre, from Latin metrum, from Greek metron ‘measure’.

Pronunciation

metre

/ˈmiːtə/