Definition of meteorology in English:

meteorology

noun

mass noun
  • 1The branch of science concerned with the processes and phenomena of the atmosphere, especially as a means of forecasting the weather.

    ‘an induction course to learn basic meteorology’
    • ‘It will investigate global atmospheric circulation dynamics, meteorology and chemistry.’
    • ‘The Other Physical Sciences category includes geology, geography, hydrology, statistics, meteorology, and physics.’
    • ‘Neil has used the same teaching method for his classes in meteorology and environmental science at Lincoln.’
    • ‘As with most other kinds of physical science, more men than women work in meteorology, but the number of women is growing.’
    • ‘Moving from meteorology as straight science to weather as journalism means more.’
    • ‘His interests went outside mathematics and he sometimes lectured on astronomy, meteorology and biology where he had a special interest in birds.’
    • ‘Professional forecasters have usually been to university to study meteorology, where for three years they learn a wide-ranging and detailed study of the physical and dynamical processes that occur in the atmosphere.’
    • ‘Evolutionary theory is no more tied to metaphysical naturalism or atheism than is meteorology or medical science.’
    • ‘While meteorology is a science complicated by chaotic weather patterns, statistics on the tumultuous developments illustrate a definite trend in the past decades.’
    • ‘In this respect, hydrological science and meteorology are still far from being able to predict, before the rains come, which thunderstorms will turn out to be the worst killers.’
    • ‘Understanding factors that affect canopy photosynthesis would contribute to agriculture, ecology, meteorology, and global science.’
    • ‘He wrote about meteorology, biology, physics, poetry, logic, rhetoric, and politics and ethics, among other subjects.’
    • ‘For more than 60 years, weather balloons have been the foundation of global meteorology as they provide atmospheric data to weather stations.’
    • ‘The larger theories of geology, astronomy, oceanology, meteorology, ecology, biology, and even physics do not lend themselves to repeatable experiments.’
    • ‘Such research includes studies in climatology, atmospheric science, meteorology, geology and geophysics, ecology, and oceanography, just to name a few.’
    • ‘But the science of meteorology, a term that dates back to Aristotle's first musings on the subject, did not really begin to make significant advances until the 18th century.’
    • ‘He did not restrict himself to studying mathematics, however, for he studied other topics such as astronomy, meteorology and chemistry.’
    • ‘Reye's early interest in mathematical physics and meteorology turned to an interest in geometry even while he held the lectureship in mathematical physics at Zurich.’
    • ‘Against these arguments, I have seen positivists argue (rightly, I believe) that such observations would also ‘prove’ that meteorology or astronomy is not a science.’
    • ‘There are numerous excursions in scientific realms of chemistry, biology, meteorology, computer science, and most of all mathematics and philosophy.’
    meteorological conditions, atmospheric conditions, climate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The climate and weather of a region.
      ‘overwintering would allow the team to investigate the island's meteorology’

Origin

Early 17th century: from Greek meteōrologia, from meteōron ‘of the atmosphere’ (see meteor).

Pronunciation

meteorology

/ˌmiːtɪəˈrɒlədʒi/