Definition of metanoia in English:

metanoia

noun

mass noun
  • Change in one's way of life resulting from penitence or spiritual conversion.

    ‘what he demanded of people was metanoia, repentance, a complete change of heart’
    • ‘The biblical word for conversion, metanoia, means not just a shift in one's views or opinions but a fundamental change in direction.’
    • ‘The Greek word for repentance is metanoia (from meta, ‘after’, and nous, ‘mind’).’
    • ‘But we can stand our ground on these points and still let the evangelicals help us balance our word to the church: inclusion and acceptance, but also metanoia and new life.’
    • ‘The uprising was a metanoia, a conversion for Michael.’
    • ‘The question is whether those of us who are concerned about tradition and innovation in Anglicanism are ready for the needed metanoia and kenosis and thus to be vulnerable in the process.’
    • ‘First, the legalistic attitude of missionaries provided communities with stories more closely related to law-givers and the Old Testament than to the commandments of love, equality and metanoia present in the New Testament.’
    • ‘The possibility open to them is repentance, the kind of radical reorientation of thinking that the New Testament writers term metanoia, literally, ‘a change of mind.’’
    • ‘This we celebrate in baptism, by the metanoia ritualized in our renunciations and affirmations, our promises, and our commitment to the church's faith.’
    • ‘This is the reason it is a place of metanoia, of turning around.’
    • ‘A moment of metanoia - a change of the inner person - is required.’
    • ‘We are at a new level of consciousness brought about by a series of spiritual awakenings, moments of metanoia, and painful, profound, and penetrating personal insights.’
    • ‘It involves metanoia, which we translate as repentance - a complete change of direction.’
    • ‘One reads of ‘heterosexists’ but not ‘homosexists’; one reads of the ‘gospel’ and metanoia but never finds either word defined.’
    • ‘But actually, repent is the Greek word, metanoia, which means literally ‘to change your mind.’’
    • ‘The Greek metanoia is a widely honored biblical way to speak of conversion, but metamorphe constitutes a more profound change that has eschatological significance.’
    • ‘There'll be many sub-sections, each with its own delegate for music, science, the power of the trinity - all that Eastern philosophy and metaphysics that I'm getting into, the metanoia.’
    • ‘Conversation is an encounter of metanoia, or it is not a conversation, not in the true sense of the word.’
    • ‘We shall have to earn absolution with a complete metanoia over a long period of time.’
    • ‘The only alternative to prooftexting is reading with a view to what the New Testament calls metanoia, repentance-literally, ‘change of mind.’’
    • ‘Recovery requires many moments of metanoia as we bring forth a new worldview and heightened consciousness.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from Greek, from metanoein ‘change one's mind’.

Pronunciation

metanoia

/ˌmɛtəˈnɔɪə/