Definition of merrymaking in English:

merrymaking

noun

  • [mass noun] Fun; festivity.

    ‘I'd had my fill of merrymaking and decided to stay put till my headache eased’
    • ‘His earlier genre scenes concentrate on peasants merrymaking or brawling in houses, taverns, or barns.’
    • ‘Little did the complacent Bezirk know that West German accounts of the very same meetings spoke of laughter, merrymaking and private house parties.’
    • ‘The Ati-atihan festival in honor of Santo Nino, one of the most revered Roman Catholic icons in the Philippines, was stopped, turning merrymaking into mourning for the victims.’
    • ‘Nozomi will bear no grudge; for it detracts from his happiness and capacity for merrymaking.’
    • ‘I tell them to celebrate widely, and I ask the police not to lock them up just because they are merrymaking.’
    • ‘Christmas trees, lights, candles, trimmings and turkeys will be among the things turning seasonal merrymaking into misery and mayhem for Swindon families over the holiday period.’
    • ‘On Friday the Museum of Richmond hosts Come Forth and Play, a look at engravings of merrymaking, playing Tudor games and making a Nine Men's Morris.’
    • ‘Large inset windows reveal generic scenes of merrymaking inside the pub.’
    • ‘Finally, scholars trace the ‘Santa Claus’ story to an incident in which an intoxicated Saint Nicholas returned home after a winter's night of merrymaking, surprised to find his house keys no longer worked.’
    • ‘Peals of laughter and merrymaking yelled out through the wood door.’
    • ‘The hours of merrymaking and celebration had stretched late the night before, and she suspected there would be more than one person who took carris seed before the ceremony.’
    • ‘It was supposed to contain not a jot of propaganda, to be all sheer art, merrymaking, and the euphoria of proud toil.’
    • ‘Throughout the European countryside, the culmination of harvest season has always been a cue for thanksgiving and merrymaking, a time to kill the fatted calf, crack open a few bottles, have a dance and get seasonally sloshed.’
    • ‘Few of us sit down every day, as they do across much of Europe, for a relaxing family meal that could take up to three hours of fun-filled banter and merrymaking to consume.’
    • ‘While our brothers and sisters in Aceh were experiencing a great calamity, some of us were indulging in convivial merrymaking at luxury hotels on New Year's Eve.’
    • ‘After an evening of requisite merrymaking, I eventually summoned forth the energy to stumble out of bed the next day and wander the short distance from my hotel to the event grounds.’
    • ‘For that authentic, sweaty, draft-drenched night-at-the-Commie experience, you're ironically advised to consider the Sidetrack Café for your New Year's merrymaking.’
    • ‘More ceilidh dancing, drinking and merrymaking.’
    • ‘Yet the din emanating from the country's corporate boardrooms is not that of clinking champagne glasses and boisterous merrymaking.’
    • ‘Call it the urge to shake a leg or a penchant for merrymaking or an ideal mix of fun and entertainment.’
    high spirits, high-spiritedness, exuberance
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

merrymaking

/ˈmɛrɪmeɪkɪŋ/