Definition of merge in English:

merge

verb

  • 1Combine or cause to combine to form a single entity.

    no object ‘the merchant bank merged with another broker’
    with object ‘he agreed to merge his broadcasting company with a multinational concern’
    • ‘The company eventually merged with Photoloft and became the Brightcube entity.’
    • ‘But in 1947 the National Peasant Party was banned, the social democrats were pressured into merging with the communists, and King Michael was forced to abdicate.’
    • ‘This year, we're merging with a neighboring school and I am really nervous - even though all of my friends are coming with me.’
    • ‘In the 1980s it succumbed too, merging with a Lancastrian brewer, which in turn was then swallowed by the giant Scottish & Newcastle.’
    • ‘But this summer they upped the ante by merging with two other combined co-ops to form a super cooperative.’
    • ‘The two institutions merged into a single entity on 1 July 2003, much to trade unions' cry of a sell-out.’
    • ‘In 1994, Meeting Point merged with the then United Democrats to form the Democratic Party.’
    • ‘As the number of people playing and watching baseball games in the community grew, The Pirates merged with another team.’
    • ‘Mirror Group was merging with Trinity, and nobody knew if the new entity would want the title.’
    • ‘He joined Boeing after it merged with McDonnell Douglas and was president and chief operating officer under Condit.’
    • ‘Their supporters are revelling in the chance to see their team in action again after the old club merged with Hull FC a year.’
    • ‘Soden has seen his proposal to create a single large Irish bank by merging with Allied Irish Banks shot down after taking on the top job at the Baggot Street headquarters in March.’
    • ‘Fifty years after the American Federation of Labor merged with the Congress of Industrial Organizations, the U.S. labor movement may be heading for a breakup.’
    • ‘The proposed European federation is unprecedented: no democracy has ever merged with another to form such an entity.’
    • ‘‘If anyone thinks merging with South Sydney will solve our problems, it won't,’ Ms Sheehan said.’
    • ‘In the fall of 2003, the Liberal Party merged with the Democratic Party of Japan, combining party identification under the DPJ name.’
    • ‘The retirement option would be available to those who have completed 40 years of age and seven years of service with the bank, including in those entities which have merged with the bank.’
    • ‘We then merged with a team who had come along to help and they asked me to continue as leader.’
    • ‘In the budget last May, the Federal Government announced that the archive was to be merged with the Australian Film Commission.’
    • ‘The current proposals are a choice between North Yorkshire Police merging with the West Yorkshire force, or being amalgamated into a Yorkshire and Humber regional force.’
    join, join together, join forces, amalgamate, consolidate, integrate, unite, unify, combine, incorporate, affiliate, coalesce, meld, agglutinate, team up, link, link up, band, band together, ally, league, federate
    amalgamate, bring together, join, consolidate, conflate, unite, combine, incorporate, coalesce, meld, pool, link, link up, knit, yoke
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Blend or cause to blend gradually into something else so as to become indistinguishable from it.
      no object ‘he crouched low and endeavoured to merge into the darkness of the forest’
      with object ‘he placed a sheet of paper over the fresh paint to merge the colours’
      • ‘The colours on her paintbrushes merged into her cancan dress, giving it a tie-dye appearance.’
      • ‘Do the characters remain consistent and unique or do they tend to blend and merge, sharing behavior traits?’
      • ‘Remember those cold winter days when you walked through a park somewhere and the traffic in the distance merged into grey noise?’
      • ‘These smaller objects, left over from the collapses of young, very massive stars gradually merged, creating a billion solar mass black hole at the centre of the galaxy.’
      • ‘The raags would be different and gradually merge into one.’
      • ‘Well, we see the world in our own colours, or perceived colours, which is not unlike normal people, except that some of our colours tend to merge.’
      • ‘Squalls were setting up whirlpools on Loch Linnhe as I set off and the distant hills of Appin merged into the dank grey of the sky.’
      • ‘Colours merge and forms emerge from within - as is Karunakaran's forte.’
      • ‘In terms of surface expansion, the central zone and the peripheral zone merge into each other gradually.’
      • ‘This is a science in which biology, chemistry, physics, and computer science draw on one another and merge to become indistinguishable.’
      • ‘Flatten Image proclaims to eradicate all the working spaces gathered so far and merge all blend modes and opacities into a concluding pixel value.’
      • ‘He says the different communities north of Winchester would merge into one indistinguishable mass of housing if Barton Farm were to be built on.’
      • ‘The days merged together in a grey blur, with Keziah throwing all her energy behind her work.’
      • ‘His practice of mobility is based on a constant but consciously unsuccessful effort to merge dissimilarities and blend antipodes.’
      • ‘Maybe the diverse threads of this wide ranging conversation are beginning to blend and merge like that imagined reflection inside the mirrored sphere.’
      • ‘But I can't quite express why it seems that way, and it may just be that they've gradually merged in my own memory.’
      • ‘Over time, the new and old populations mingled, traded, intermarried and merged.’
      • ‘The colours on the canvas merge into the music as the dancers whip up a rhythm with their graceful movements.’
      • ‘Audio visual is a sequence of slides that merge and blend into each other using two or more projectors with a synchronised music store and commentary.’
      • ‘The plywood is painted slate grey to merge with the surrounding rock, so the building looks as though it is an organic part of the landscape.’
      mingle, blend, fuse, fade into one another, melt into one another, run into one another, mix, intermix, intermingle, commingle, converge, integrate, coalesce, compound, homogenize, emulsify, lump, lump together, mass, conglomerate
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2usually merge something inLaw with object Absorb (a title or estate) in another.
      • ‘It was suggested that when a statute is passed empowering the Crown to do a certain thing which it might theretofore have done by virtue of its prerogative, the prerogative is merged in the statute.’

Origin

Mid 17th century (in the sense ‘immerse oneself’): from Latin mergere ‘to dip, plunge’; the legal sense is from Anglo-Norman French merger.

Pronunciation

merge

/məːdʒ/