Main definitions of mentalist in English

: mentalist1mentalist2

mentalist1

noun

  • 1A magician who performs feats that apparently demonstrate extraordinary mental powers, such as mind-reading.

    • ‘No. Strays isn't mentalist enough to veer off in that kind of direction, it's all too tight.’
    • ‘No he is not, any more than any other lonely, confused mentalist out there.’
    • ‘Lambeth was like a 3 year prison sentence in Broadmoor, full of absolute mentalists and knobbers.’
    • ‘It seems there are more mentalists out there than we had at first feared.’
    • ‘But as anyone knows, if you lie down and have a forty minute kip in the aisle of a supermarket, the manager will think you are a mentalist and tell you to move on.’
    • ‘You feed chickens to cows you mentalist.’
    • ‘Worrying thing is he's a spitting image of a guy I knew a few years back who was borderline mentalist.’
    • ‘For an uncritical mentalist, no such indeterminacy threatens.’
    • ‘You could, if you were a mentalist, spend £5,000 on a suit, or a cooker, or a set of speakers for your drawing room.’
    • ‘I am a mentalist with over a dozen years' experience reading minds and astonishing audiences.’
  • 2British informal An eccentric or mad person.

    • ‘No he is not, any more than any other lonely, confused mentalist out there.’
    • ‘It seems there are more mentalists out there than we had at first feared.’
    • ‘Then, over the next half an hour, a bunch of gonzo skateboarders and other mentalists from the mall construct slapstick routines, some of them bordering on the life-threatening.’
    • ‘Even his wife and daughter are less relieved to see him and be rescued than they are concerned by how much of a mentalist he has become.’
    • ‘Am I a raving mentalist or does everyone do this?’
    • ‘You could, if you were a mentalist, spend £5,000 on a suit, or a cooker, or a set of speakers for your drawing room.’
    • ‘For an uncritical mentalist, no such indeterminacy threatens.’
    • ‘I then suggested a cardboard cut out of Juliet like the ones of Darth Vader and Stormtroopers that Star Wars mentalists have in their kitchens.’
    • ‘To wit: ever since I've been working here on my own devoid of any human contact, I've been turning into a small-minded tight-fisted anal-retentive mentalist.’
    • ‘I very much doubt it, you mentalist.’
    • ‘My neighbours are mentalists.’
    • ‘Lambeth was like a 3 year prison sentence in Broadmoor, full of absolute mentalists and knobbers.’

Pronunciation:

mentalist

/ˈmɛnt(ə)lɪst/

Main definitions of mentalist in English

: mentalist1mentalist2

mentalist2

noun

Philosophy
  • An adherent of mentalism.

    • ‘He's a mentalist, which is recreating, or pretending to read, people's minds - giving the illusion of reading people's minds, all using tricks you can come up with.’
    • ‘In 1983, as a mentalist and top research psychologist, Bem was asked to evaluate Charles Honorton's laboratory in Princeton, New Jersey.’
    • ‘Few people outside of magic circles are aware of just how accomplished he is as a magician / mentalist.’
    • ‘Chief among his trophies was Uri Geller, an Israeli-born, disco-era mentalist who claimed, among other things, that he had the ability to soften metal and move a compass needle with his mind.’
    • ‘‘Psychics’ who are honest about their deception call themselves mentalists and call their art magic or conjuring.’
    • ‘The main purpose of this particular trip is to do some lectures for magicians and mentalists in various East Coast locations.’
    • ‘When I was a sophomore, majoring in journalism, a well-known mentalist and trusted friend persuaded me to try an experiment in which I would deliberately read a client's hand opposite to what the signs in her hand indicated.’
    • ‘There are a number of effects that rely on either increasing or reducing attention at the moment the method is put into play, and mentalists take full advantage of this.’
    • ‘A mentalist is a performer who uses trickery and deception to create the illusion of having paranormal or supernatural powers.’
    • ‘The performance of mentalists may be closer to that of the pseudo-psychics than to magicians.’
    • ‘Many magicians do what Geller does, but they call themselves magicians, conjurers, or mentalists.’
    • ‘I'm reminded at this point of the great mentalist Joseph Dunninger, who I knew well.’
    • ‘In the afternoon there was Marc Salem, the mentalist, who blew my tiny mind by knowing what I was going to say before I even said it.’

adjective

Philosophy
  • Relating to mentalists or mentalism.

    • ‘It is thus more mentalist than sociobiology, and draws on the explanatory tools of cognitive science, such as the use of the language of information processing to describe the mind.’
    • ‘He says that he is deliberately avoiding the trap of trying to specifically define such mentalist terms as mind cognition, perception, and other closely related mentalistic terms.’
    • ‘Marvin Harris was a brilliant, formidable critic of everyone who flirted with neo-Kantian philosophical idealism and mentalist definitions of social phenomena, from Hegel to Weber and Parsons.’
    • ‘Chris Weston's detailed, sophisticated art bridges the mundane and the mentalist.’
    • ‘The ‘special powers’ accusation most often happens in a mentalist or spiritualist act.’

Pronunciation:

mentalist

/ˈmɛnt(ə)lɪst/