Definition of melt in English:

melt

verb

  • 1Make or become liquefied by heating.

    [with object] ‘the hot metal melted the wax’
    ‘asparagus with melted butter’
    [no object] ‘place under a hot grill until the cheese has melted’
    • ‘Stones dropped from melting Canadian icebergs have been found in sea sediments off the coast of Portugal.’
    • ‘Wildlife is scarce in the region this time of year but will return when the snow melts this spring and summer.’
    • ‘Rather than melting away like normal frost, the coldness lingered where Bruetar had grasped the hilt of the sword.’
    • ‘White snow gently fell onto the glass of the skylight, melting away.’
    • ‘The blizzards had ceased three days ago and the remaining snow was swiftly melting away in the face of the late January sun.’
    • ‘I plan to go every available weekend until the snow melts away.’
    • ‘Add the Stilton, milk and cream and heat gently stirring often until the Stilton has melted and the soup is hot.’
    • ‘Volcanism can have a large effect on the dating of any particular sample, of course, because when a rock melts it will release the gasses trapped in the rock matrix and therefore restart the atomic clock.’
    • ‘The debris protects the ice from melting and sustains a thin body of ice that would otherwise have melted away.’
    • ‘This snow didn't melt as soon as it touched you… it stuck to your skin and sat there before slowly melting away.’
    • ‘Mixed with melting snow, people had to walk on footpaths covered by dark water.’
    • ‘They need no more than a brushing of oil, and the briefest encounter with the hot surface, and they turn all brown and crunchy on the outside, green, tender and melting within.’
    • ‘New research reveals that the rapidly melting glaciers are even changing the shape of the planet, making the earth more oblate than spherical.’
    • ‘Temperatures are climbing, sea levels are rising, Antarctica is thawing - and these are just the tip of the rapidly melting iceberg.’
    • ‘I smell something strange and find the smoke alarm melted on the stove.’
    • ‘Plastic bags are no good because they would melt.’
    • ‘I have used Italian Taleggio, French Cantal and Swiss Gruyère, and even goat's cheese on one occasion, to melt over the tender potatoes.’
    • ‘Once before in Shanghai, I had gone to see some ice sculptures in an exhibition but a huge cold-air blower had to be used to protect the sculptures from melting away.’
    • ‘If you need emergency water, melt the snow first and then drink liquid water.’
    • ‘It was all covered in white frost, glinting and melting away with the first rays of the sun, making it a perfect picture for a postcard.’
    liquefy, thaw, unfreeze, defrost, soften, run, flux, fuse, render, clarify, dissolve, deliquesce
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object]Melt a metal article so as to reuse the raw material.
      ‘beautiful objects are being melted down and sold for scrap’
      • ‘Cleveland Police said the chain was not something that could be sold on easily, but it might be melted down.’
      • ‘And the chances are good that scrap metal dealers in Johannesburg are buying your water meter, melting it down and then selling it off as junk.’
      • ‘It takes apart the components and melts them down or refurbishes newer models and sells them on to developing countries.’
      • ‘Other companies take scrap metal and melt it down for use in lowgrade metal products like garden furniture and sign posts.’
      • ‘Maxfield hoped to buy the inventory, melt it down and create a sculpture from the metal.’
      • ‘The better ones were put aside while the old and battered sinkers were melted down using a blowtorch and re-moulded into varying sizes according to the needs of the shopkeeper.’
      • ‘If the trade centre scrap reaches specifications it will be melted down and used to configure the cutting edge of the ship's bow, according to a spokesman for Northorp Grumman, the yard operators.’
      • ‘The cans that Montrealers put in their green boxes are compressed into 3’ x 3’ x 4’ bales and sent to companies like Sidbec-Dosco, which melts them down along with old automobile carcasses.’
      • ‘Police mounted a lengthy surveillance operation in the grounds of his West Kingsdown home to look for signs that he was transporting the gold in small lots to Bristol where it was melted down and recast, prior to being sold.’
      • ‘Most of the statue will be melted down and used to make a memorial in Texas.’
      • ‘But the railings were back up in Bedford Square soon enough and have been ever since (I'm assuming they were removed during the war, as iron railings were melted down for armament production).’
      • ‘Some of these same bells were melted down to make ammunition for the struggling Southern war machine.’
      • ‘The king even melted down his own plate to make coins.’
      • ‘The metal shavings from drilling the original holes were melted down, and poured back to fill the holes seamlessly.’
      • ‘The bell was melted down and recast, then rung carefully for special events.’
      • ‘Guns are often melted down, while hard currency may be donated to a charitable fund.’
      • ‘All the guns from York and Selby will be sent to North Yorkshire Police headquarters, at Newby Wiske, before being transported to a South Yorkshire company, where they will be melted down and recycled for other uses.’
      • ‘That the tablet was broken in antiquity can be proved from a scientific analysis of the lines of fracture; maybe someone in ancient times intended to melt it down and reuse the bronze.’
      • ‘The FA Cup was stolen from football outfitters William Shillock in Birmingham - 68 years later an 83-year-old man confessed that he had melted it down to make counterfeit half-crown coins.’
      • ‘Then you have cases where common people who find antiquities often melt them down for the gold, or simply throw them away.’
    2. 1.2[no object]Dissolve in liquid.
      ‘add 400g sugar and boil until the sugar melts’
      • ‘The ivory dough from the dumplings' outer shell is so tender, they melt in your mouth.’
      • ‘Frayed nerves and tense muscles seemed to melt in the viscous liquid that poured out of the brass container suspended above me.’
      • ‘The snow was white powdered sugar that quickly melted on the hot banana, just like real snow does when falling onto the ground.’
      • ‘Add a small packet of white marshmallows, stir until melted in.’
      • ‘Salts conduct electricity well when melted or when dissolved in water or some other solvents but not when they are solid.’
      • ‘Put the butter, sugar, cream and golden syrup into a pan and leave over a low heat until the sugar has melted.’
      • ‘Add the anchovy fillets and cook gently until almost melting.’
      • ‘Melt the butter in a frying pan and add the sugar, then cook for three-four minutes until it melts and caramelises.’
      • ‘When the sugar has melted, add all the ingredients, except raisins and salt.’
      • ‘I like turning those walls to sugar and watching them melt in the rain.’
      • ‘Stir in gelatine until it has melted, cool slightly then quickly stir in the yoghurt mixture.’
      • ‘Heat the butter in a large frying pan and stir in the sugar until melted.’
      • ‘Stir often until caramelized sugar melts again and mixture is reduced to about 3/4 cup, about 5 minutes.’
      • ‘Cook the cauliflower until almost melting - if it is slightly crunchy, it won't liquidise to a velvety consistency.’
      • ‘Add two tablespoons of honey and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the soap has melted.’
      • ‘The glass in the tram car windows melted; stocks of sugar boiled in bakery cellars.’
      • ‘Braise the pear on a slow fire until the crystal sugar melts.’
      • ‘Heating the sugar until it melts, as practised in many bars, is a Czechoslovakian custom.’
      • ‘For filling, heat white chocolate until just melted and cool for 5 minutes.’
      • ‘We used butter too sometimes, but you need softened butter and butter would also melt the sugar a bit, making the sandwich less crunchy.’
    3. 1.3informal [no object](of a person) suffer extreme heat.
      • ‘Close by was a 90C sauna and steam room where I enjoyed almost melting to death.’
      • ‘If I was sweating before, I was practically melting now.’
      • ‘It is such a GORGEOUS day today, and it's hot, soooo hot, I feel like I'm melting.’
      • ‘Stains around her body show that she had melted to the carpet as a result of the humid weather conditions.’
      • ‘Well, some are, but that's not why they're melting in High Barnet on the hottest day of the year.’
      • ‘Today the temperature got up to 92 degrees F / 33 degrees C and it felt like I was melting.’
      • ‘Melbourne, Australia - At times she looked like she may melt as the center court temperatures soared.’
      • ‘Riana felt warm all over, like she was melting and it was becoming increasingly difficult to focus on anything besides the sound of Luke's voice.’
  • 2Make or become more tender or loving.

    [with object] ‘Richard gave her a smile which melted her heart’
    [no object] ‘she was so beautiful that I melted’
    • ‘Jadelyn followed his gaze and nearly melted at the tenderness with which he looked at his sister and how protective he was of her.’
    • ‘I could feel his breath on my lips and suddenly I was melting.’
    • ‘She was used to people melting at the mere sight of her brother.’
    • ‘Opening the lid, Zoe's cold heart almost melted completely.’
    • ‘Debbie Harry sang the final verse and chorus in French, and a million teenage boys melted.’
    • ‘I would just look into his beautiful eyes and melt.’
    • ‘Sometimes I can seem a little hard, but show warmth and I soon melt.’
    • ‘It was a smile Elizabeth had never seen on her husband's face before; one so full of love and tenderness that her heart melted.’
    • ‘He was melting as he put an arm across her bare shoulders.’
    • ‘When he cupped her cheek with his other hand in a tender concerned way, she tried desperately not to melt.’
    • ‘Her eyes looked deep into his and softened in that loving way that always made him melt.’
    • ‘But he's also a compassionate, caring man whose heart melts for people who are suffering’
    • ‘He and Qi share no chemistry - she bakes him some madeleines after he rescues her from the bad guys and suddenly we're supposed to believe this hardened soldier melts like the pastry in his mouth.’
    • ‘Although Liz melts for Shaun's sudden charismatic evolution, the most touching relationship in the film is between the two best friends.’
    • ‘And despite herself, Matilda gives in to Ric's charm - she's totally melting for the guy!’
    • ‘She looked up at Harris and felt as if she was melting.’
    • ‘I looked into her green eyes and felt like I was melting.’
    • ‘And the way she had - her demeanor with people, it just - it causes people to melt.’
    • ‘He looked into my eyes and I felt like I was melting.’
    • ‘The next, she is melting and vulnerable, taking a deserted 14-year-old kid called Volodya under her wing and showing him what best friends are for.’
    soften, touch, disarm, mollify, relax, affect, move
    View synonyms
  • 3[no object, with adverbial] Disappear or disperse.

    ‘the compromise was accepted and the opposition melted away’
    • ‘With the price artificially high, demand for that labor melted away.’
    • ‘Although there were minor differences between the voices of boy and girl soloists, these melted away in a choir, said Professor Howard.’
    • ‘As they vanished behind the trees that surrounded the park, I felt rather strange, as if 60 years had just melted away.’
    • ‘It was hours before they finished filming and the crowds out outside melted away so the pair of us could leg it home.’
    • ‘But the armies melted away under the crushing superiority of the enemy.’
    • ‘Rowena's frown melted away as she sensed the air cooling dramatically.’
    • ‘Without another word, he vanished, melted away into the shadows, which slowly began to dissolve.’
    • ‘In only two elections the whole of that lead has melted away.’
    • ‘The mining town that was once here has melted away, leaving the classic two-storey pub, with its pretty wooden veranda, sitting alone in a gentle fold of the hills.’
    • ‘Carly's voice seemed to fade out with the rest of the world, melting away like butter in a microwave.’
    • ‘The popular theory has it that these problems have melted away as the country has prospered.’
    • ‘Although many sceptics of global warming have melted away in recent years, some eminent ones remain.’
    • ‘The press coverage was disapproving but still fairly low-key; few columnists rushed to respond and, in the end, the story melted away like a bad smell.’
    • ‘After listening to a five-minute speech outside County Hall - empty of staff for the bank holiday - they melted away as peacefully as they had come.’
    • ‘The impish smile that had not left his face for the past hour melted away.’
    • ‘How have the readership gains melted away so quickly?’
    • ‘His militia has either melted away or been killed or captured.’
    • ‘Davis grinned inanely as his support melted away.’
    • ‘In an instant every trace of fox had melted away.’
    • ‘The bad blood between them melted away with the band's delight that the musical chemistry was intact.’
    vanish, vanish into thin air, disappear, fade away
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1Change or merge imperceptibly into (another form or state)
      ‘the cheers melted into gasps of admiration’
      • ‘At the nearest turning he waited till the silhouette of the three persons melted into the distance and disappeared.’
      • ‘Beef stew uses cuts like chuck, blade and shin, which have fat that melts into the sauce, making it velvety and delicious.’
      • ‘Blectum's plunderphonic audio collage soon melts into digital abstraction, and eventually breaks the sound down into a few clicks and cuts.’
      • ‘Spaced-out, synthy and slick, each song melts into the next.’
      • ‘When heated, mascarpone melts into a creamy sauce.’
      • ‘So many times on this trip with Asia, I have had this sensation of the past melting into the present.’
      • ‘The interview with de Vries is different, changing form slowly, almost imperceptibly at first, like an ice cube slowly melting into water.’
      • ‘And where do these waterways - some of them melting into each other - begin and end?’
      • ‘Schumacher opens the film in terrific style with a black and white section set in 1919 Paris, which gradually melts into a full colour flashback to the bustling 1870s.’
      • ‘The stage is painted with blue sky melting into the ocean, in front of which typical Irish music and American country music will be played.’
      • ‘Set in a secluded meadow in Yosemite Valley against granite cliffs, the 99-room hotel of stone, glass and concrete melts into its remarkable setting.’
      • ‘Beyond the city, urban sprawl quickly melts into full-on farmland, your jarred spine straightens out again and the whole week's expedition seems to stretch ahead to the horizon beneath immense white clouds.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, cream the yeast in a bowl with the water and milk, then stir in the butter and keep stirring until it has melted into the mixture.’
      • ‘He uses a whole Reblochon cheese from the Savoie region of France which melts into the mixture of potatoes, onions and bacon.’
      • ‘That flat stomach melts into soft library flab as library time takes precedence over exercise.’
      • ‘Working with light hues, the artist generates the impression of his motifs melting into a suffusion of light and shade on the computer generated prints.’
      • ‘The music melts into silence as the batteries of the radio fade.’
      • ‘Melt it and mix it with double cream and you have chocolate heaven: pop one of Michel Cluizel's oval buttons in your mouth and it slowly melts into a luscious chocolate swirl.’
      • ‘I am so tired that my body feels like it's melting into the floor.’
      • ‘I love the feeling of slowness and how a day can start off with a chilling coldness that melts into a strange half-warmness later on.’

noun

  • 1An act or period of melting.

    ‘the precipitation falls as snow and is released during the spring melt’
    • ‘The ice-free seas will further exacerbate the melt, as the reduced reflection of light will result in the dark seas absorbing more warmth.’
    • ‘Multiyear ice is defined as ice that has survived a minimum of two summer melt seasons.’
    • ‘For a week the weather had been clear and sharp, with subfreezing lows and small melts in the afternoons.’
    • ‘Moreover, as the Arctic warms, the length of the melt period increases, which in turn thins the ice and further hastens its retreat.’
    • ‘As the 13th melt was nearing completion, something in the pit exploded.’
    • ‘He expects the spring melt to wash most of the remaining oil into an adjacent lake where floating booms will prevent further spread and allow for recovery.’
    • ‘But when the spring melt comes, some dissolved alpha-HCH flows into the Atlantic.’
    • ‘In Mr. Quirouette's opinion, the four major causes are rain, wind-driven rain, snow and ice melt, and condensation.’
    • ‘This could translate into further storage improvements for Lake McConaughy as we move into the spring melt period.’
    • ‘Days of heavy rain and a sudden melt of snow on the North York Moors were blamed for the rapidly-rising river levels.’
    • ‘Following melt initiation, the intensity of melt is another consideration in the production of meltwater runoff.’
    • ‘With a spring melt, ipirautiik, waterproof boots, replace the furry boots.’
    1. 1.1[mass noun]Metal or other material in a melted condition.
      • ‘Field evidence suggests that many dykes were responsible for transporting melt, and this would substantially reduce the inflation time.’
      • ‘Interestingly, high-temperature melting experiments have shown similar peritectic assemblages coexisting with granitic melt.’
      • ‘The blue colour of smalt derives from the addition of cobalt oxide to a potash glass melt during manufacture.’
      • ‘These melts will only crystallize within this period if they segregate from their protoliths.’
      • ‘These melts have low silica contents and are dominated by calcium and magnesium carbonate.’
      • ‘You know, I'm listening to you and Orelon talk about the melt on the trees and the ice still on the trees.’
      • ‘The research compares with estimates which put the rate of rise lower and which blame most of that on thermal expansion rather than ice melt.’
      • ‘Should any such pathways exist they would be filled by recrystallized silicate melt where they impinged on the zone of partial melting.’
      • ‘Mullite crystals grow out of a complex silicate melt - porcelain kilns never attain pure silica's melting point.’
      • ‘Another effect will be to lower the peraluminosity and decrease the lime content of the melt.’
      • ‘This is too long to preserve small bodies of melt in the crust, and suggests that the scenario is appropriate to neither the Waipiata nor the western Hungarian field.’
      • ‘Still, it is scientifically preferable to collect samples of the melt that formed during the creation of a specific lunar impact basin.’
      • ‘This suggests that melting of basement rocks at a deeper crustal level, with some input of juvenile melt from the mantle, may have generated the dyke.’
      • ‘The container then sinks through the melt under the influence of gravity and eventually comes to rest when the heat or the waste itself is dissipated.’
      • ‘He argued that all other granites represent hybrid magma formed by reaction of basaltic melt with crustal metamorphic rocks.’
    2. 1.2A quantity of metal melted at one operation.
      • ‘Dingwell et al. have shown at low dissolved water contents in rhyolitic melts, large changes in melt viscosity can occur for very small changes of water content.’
    3. 1.3North American [with modifier]A sandwich, hamburger, or other dish containing or topped with melted cheese.
      ‘a tuna melt’
      • ‘We decided on the gyros and tuna melt.’
      • ‘He's grabbed some hamburgers, coke, and for you Amber, I told him to get you water and a cheese melt.’
      • ‘Quite literally, they were covered in foil much like a tuna melt floundering in a microwave.’
      • ‘My favorite cheat meal is a patty melt, but the restaurant versions have way too much fat.’
      • ‘I was was eating a patty melt and fries on my sofa watching Letterman, so clearly I was home around midnight.’
      • ‘At present the most popular baguette is the chicken and cheese melt with lettuce and mayonnaise called Lisa after the customer who first ordered the filling.’
      • ‘Ann spotted one of her favourites and asked for the tuna melt.’
      • ‘I think about that as I chomp on my half of the melt, but Smith is still too busy talking to eat.’
      • ‘And so, for no good reason, on my first visit I ordered, of all things, a tuna melt, a meatball sub, and a roast beef sandwich.’
      • ‘Also included are keema and peas with naan bread, vine tomato and mozzarella melt, tuna salad and chicken curry.’
      • ‘As the prices were so reasonable, daughter decided to skip the two-course special and chose the chicken and cranberry melt - light and tasty.’
      • ‘Hot Italian snacks, otherwise known as panini, came with chargrilled vegetables and mozzarella cheese or tuna melt.’
      • ‘Other items I spotted were toasted focaccia, chicken satay and roasted vegetables with cheese melt each for £2.99.’
      • ‘There is also a range of light meals (such as tuna melt or steak 'n' cheese sandwiches), plus desserts.’
      • ‘Patty, the vegetarian, shared a tuna melt with Molly and later they felt ill.’
      • ‘I picked up a pressed penny for my sister, grabbed a fine lunch of lobster bisque and a crab melt, then went for Round Two, this time at Mohegan Sun.’
      • ‘He ordered himself a tuna melt, left his door open for other patients to stroll in and was back in uniform the next day.’

Phrases

  • melt in the mouth

    • (of food) be deliciously light or tender and need little chewing.

      ‘they ate lamb which melted in the mouth’
      • ‘It melts in the mouth in a delicious way, making it my favourite among all the pastries available.’
      • ‘My own pepper was equally satisfying; a whole, succulent green pepper so tender it melted in the mouth, piping hot and stuffed to bursting with rice and mincemeat.’
      • ‘The thin strips of pink lamb melted in the mouth but I felt the many sweet elements crowded out the quality lamb.’
      • ‘The meats were tender and tasty; the lamb melting in the mouth.’
      • ‘Tom's tart looked more like a huge Danish pastry, but was absolutely delicious: the pastry melted in the mouth and the melange of Brie and leeks was judged to perfection.’
      • ‘The fishcake - and it was just one, but well-sized - was deliciously light and melted in the mouth, while the Hanoi duck came inside a stack of tortillas and salsa that looked bizarre but tasted sensational.’
      • ‘String beans of the variety known as Tender Green are stringless, extra large, and will melt in the mouth even when the pods are five inches long.’
      • ‘The beef is so extremely tender that it seems to melt in the mouth.’
      • ‘The pulled pork is, quite simply, melt in the mouth, while the chicken is juicily tender.’
      • ‘I ensure that the fresh herbs and spices thoroughly infuse the dishes so that the meat becomes so tender it really melts in the mouth,’ he said.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • melt down

    • 1Collapse or break down disastrously.

      ‘many expected him to melt down at the first sign of trouble’
      • ‘Just letting Citigroup melt down could have been catastrophic.’
      • ‘Well, day four of her confirmation hearings, and the woman is not melting down.’
      • ‘Ned Yost seemed to melt down at the end of last season.’
      • ‘Next thing you know, her campaign melts down.’
      • ‘The case was worth deciding this way, just to witness otherwise sensible intelligent academics melt down.’
      • ‘The recent site melt down has allowed me to repost this article with several more images.’
      • ‘But day after day, the enthusiasm is melting down.’
      • ‘In spite of history-making efforts by governments around the world, financial markets everywhere are still melting down.’
      • ‘In fact, they delayed finalizing the satellite deal, which was announced last September just as the economy was melting down.’
      • ‘During the past century empires crashed, new states foundered, utopian projects failed and entire civilisations melted down.’
    • 2(of a nuclear reactor) undergo a catastrophic failure as a result of the fuel overheating.

      ‘if the pumps that cool the reactor core become disabled the core could begin to overheat, and the reactor could melt down’
      • ‘Many expected him to melt down at the first sign of trouble.’

Origin

Old English meltan, mieltan, of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse melta to malt, digest, from an Indo-European root shared by Greek meldein to melt, Latin mollis soft, also by malt.

Pronunciation:

melt

/mɛlt/