Main definitions of meld in English

: meld1meld2

meld1

verb

  • Blend; combine:

    [with object] ‘Australia's winemakers have melded modern science with traditional art’
    [no object] ‘the nylon bristles shrivel and meld together’
    • ‘But despite these varying degrees of success, the three twisted tales meld together smoothly, forming one perfectly disturbing anthology.’
    • ‘The minute we saw it, we felt it was just right for the site - all our ideas seemed to meld together.’
    • ‘It seems obvious, but food manufacturers were originally catering to a mainstream taste that they tried to meld together from focus groups and other research methods.’
    • ‘To make it on the stove top, sauté the onion and garlic, parboil the potato and then let everything simmer for as long as possible to let the flavours meld together.’
    • ‘Poe's general modus operandi was to meld together facts with fiction.’
    • ‘We were trying to meld together the best of the two diverse philosophies: the approach of the Hon Doug Graham and of Dianne Yates.’
    • ‘The Garifuna still practice an Afro-Caribbean form of ancestor worship that helps to meld together families broken by migration, plural marriages, and a social environment hostile to people of their race and culture.’
    • ‘The shadows seemed to meld together, and shape a human form - Damion!’
    • ‘Some of the other students commented on how weird it was that we seemed to meld together, covering each other's flaws, strengthening each other and creating an incredible musical union.’
    • ‘Davis chose at this time to meld together some of the primal, guttural aspects of rock, particularly in the bottom end, rhythms, drums and the bass.’
    • ‘The choruses meld together quite nicely to complement each other.’
    • ‘The seaweed will be dry and crisp at this stage but as soon as you start filling it, it will dampen and the layers will meld together.’
    • ‘The endless demos, petitions, teach-ins, sit-ins, and conferences meld together into one prototypical news story, complete with oversized photos.’
    • ‘I like trying to meld together these parameters, to create an illusion, at least, of balance between modes of expression.’
    • ‘All of these systems meld together to create what we feel is the most accurate depiction of siege warfare and castle life ever portrayed in a computer game.’
    • ‘The most startling aspect of the game is the mix of people who meld together on the five-a-side pitch.’
    • ‘Manx was so inspired that he promptly moved to India to track his soon-to-be mentor down, and for the next few years learned to meld together the sounds of the East and West.’
    • ‘It's not just the expertise and virtuosity of the individual musicians in ‘California Jazz’, it's the way they meld together to present some of the coolest hot jazz being played in Shanghai at the moment.’
    • ‘As these moments spring to mind, let them meld together in your imagination.’
    • ‘In the medical arena, nanotechnology and biotechnology may well be destined to meld together.’
    combine, merge, unite, integrate, fuse, blend, mingle, coalesce, consolidate, meld, intermingle, mix, intermix, incorporate, affiliate
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noun

  • A thing formed by melding; a combination:

    ‘a meld of many contributions’
    • ‘He needs to slip into old clothes so that he could feel free to stretch out on the hay beside the brook and bathe in a meld of physical sensations.’
    • ‘Once known as the Enchanted Isles, the Galapagos to first time visitors are a meld of mysticism and stark reality.’
    amalgamation, amalgam, merger, union, blend, mixture, mix, mingling, meld, fusion, fusing, compound, alloy, marriage, weave, coalescence, coalition, pooling, integration, conjunction, incorporation, synthesis, composite, composition, concoction
    View synonyms

Origin

1930s: perhaps a blend of melt and weld.

Pronunciation:

meld

/mɛld/

Main definitions of meld in English

: meld1meld2

meld2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • (in rummy, canasta, and other card games) lay down or declare (a combination of cards) in order to score points:

    ‘a player has melded four kings’
    • ‘It is possible to go out in the melding part of a turn, by melding all of your cards, or to meld all but one of your cards, and go out by discarding your last card.’
    • ‘As well as melding complete combinations, players are allowed to meld cards which extend combinations which are already on the table.’
    • ‘Again the aim is to get rid of all your cards by melding them.’
    • ‘There are two ways of scoring points: by melding combinations and by winning scoring cards in tricks.’
    • ‘Players score for cards melded according to the point values printed on the cards, and are penalised for unmelded cards when another player goes out.’

noun

  • A completed set or run of cards in rummy, canasta, and other card games:

    ‘his meld was poor and he lost’
    • ‘You must have at least one example of each type - natural, mixed, wild, sequence and sevens - completed with 7 cards in each, and you may also have additional canastas or smaller melds of any types.’
    • ‘Note that in this version of Canasta, melds consisting entirely of wild cards are not allowed.’
    • ‘You can lay off cards on your own melds, and on those of your partner and opponents.’
    • ‘In later melds and when laying off cards on existing melds, jokers can be used freely to substitute for any card.’
    • ‘It is possible to pick up the discard pile if it is not frozen and you have a meld or canasta in the same rank as the top card of the pile.’

Origin

Late 19th century (originally US): from German melden announce.

Pronunciation:

meld

/mɛld/