Definition of Mede in English:

Mede

noun

  • A member of an Indo-European people who inhabited ancient Media, establishing an extensive empire during the 7th century BC.

    • ‘Like most of the Assyrian cities, Ashur was sacked in 612 BC when the ferocious and warlike Assyrians were finally overwhelmed by the combined forces of Babylonians and Medes.’
    • ‘During the reign of the Medes, the Iranians adopted the Babylon Cuneiform symbols and later they created the Avesta and Pahlavi scripts using Arami scripts.’
    • ‘And Darius the Mede took the kingdom, being about three score and two years old.’
    • ‘The Medes and the Babylonians divided their power, and were themselves swallowed up in the monarchy of the Persians, whose arms could not be confined within the narrow limits of Asia.’
    • ‘The founder of the Persian Empire, Cyrus, in finding the Medes soft as a result of a long period of peace, defeated them and established an empire.’

Phrases

  • law of the Medes and Persians

    • Something which cannot be altered.

      ‘God's laws of nature were like those of the Medes and the Persians, which changed not’
      • ‘The power of the lions, the power of the law of the Medes and Persians, all the powers that bind people to cycles of destruction, are brought under the power of the God who delivers and rescues.’
      • ‘The king hoped to dismiss the charge, but Darius’ advisors reminded the king that the law of the Medes and Persians could not be broken.’
      • ‘The saying that ` The law of the Medes and Persians altereth not’ was merely an ancient periphrasis for the absolutism of the sovereign.’
      • ‘They became one kingdom with one law - ‘the law of the Medes and Persians’.’
      • ‘The king answered and said, ‘The thing is true, according to the law of the Medes and Persians, which does not alter.’’
      • ‘Here is the law of the Medes and Persians which altereth not.’
      • ‘So let Your Majesty issue this order and sign it, and it will be in force, a law of the Medes and Persians, which cannot be changed.’
      • ‘To drive the point home, the bureaucrats reminded the king: ‘Remember, O king, that according to the law of the Medes and Persians no decree or edict that the king issues can be changed.’’
      • ‘He knew that if Esther refused, she too would perish because the law of the Medes and Persians showed no favoritism.’
      • ‘Now, Your Majesty, issue the decree and put it in writing so that it cannot be altered - in accordance with the law of the Medes and Persians, which cannot be repealed.’

Origin

From Latin Medi, Greek Mēdoi, plural forms.

Pronunciation

Mede

/miːd/