Definition of maze in English:

maze

noun

  • 1A network of paths and hedges designed as a puzzle through which one has to find a way.

    ‘the house has a maze and a walled Italian garden’
    • ‘As I got closer to the entrance of the hedge maze I couldn't see anybody there so I had to question why I'd been directed here.’
    • ‘They turn a corner of the hedge maze and find the statue of Theo's bride.’
    • ‘He was unaware of the beautiful garden nestled in the heart of the hedge maze.’
    • ‘I opened another door and we entered a vast maze.’
    • ‘Quixotic mazes made with podacarpus hedges or scarlet red bean vines can be done with a little imagination.’
    • ‘Puzzle Planet is the latest attraction at the centre where you can pit your wits against a series of mazes, brainteasers and puzzles to see if you've got the brains to be an astronomer.’
    • ‘The maize maze at Blake End, near Braintree, is open for the summer and is growing fast.’
    • ‘My hedge maze is two straight lines of bushes that lead to a cactus.’
    • ‘He chuckled at my comment and grabbed my hand as we entered the maze.’
    • ‘The proof of Euler's theorem actually gives us a way of solving the maze.’
    • ‘The corn maze to the north is amazing, and there are farm lands and woods everywhere.’
    • ‘It has paintings, jigsaw puzzles, a maze, skill games and more.’
    • ‘The modern use of the hedge maze is now purely recreational.’
    • ‘Hence mother rats negotiated complex mazes better than their virgin sisters.’
    • ‘Some force you to navigate hedge mazes or find countless skulls while stumbling through underground passages.’
    • ‘You are strongly urged to solve the maze before looking closely at the answer!’
    • ‘It seemed to be one of those hedge mazes that you always saw in movies or read about in books.’
    • ‘More prosaically, unlike conventional hedge mazes, the gabion cages will require minimal maintenance and should last for 50 years.’
    • ‘When the rats were put in mazes designed to test learning and memory, those that had been anaesthetised performed worse than those that had not been given the drugs.’
    • ‘The maze will be at the farm until the plants wither away in October when the field will be cut, ready for a new maze with a new design next year.’
    1. 1.1 A complex network of paths or passages.
      ‘they were trapped in a menacing maze of corridors’
      • ‘He led us quickly out of the courtyard and through a confusing maze of corridors.’
      • ‘He kept running, turning through a maze of alleys and back roads.’
      • ‘The two men followed as the warden led them through a veritable maze of stone passages and metal walkways.’
      • ‘All the buildings nearby create a maze of alleyways and rooftops.’
      • ‘You are in a twisty maze of passageways, all alike.’
      • ‘They marched on and on, down what seemed to be an endless maze of hallways and side passages.’
      • ‘The whole area was an underground maze of tunnels and bunkers.’
      • ‘After a seemingly endless maze of corridors and rooms, he finally made it to his wing of the castle.’
      • ‘They walked through an intricate maze of hallways before reaching a large arena filled with all sorts of technical equipment.’
      • ‘I went outside and let myself get lost in the maze of streets.’
      • ‘In the center of the glacier I entered a maze of slot canyons made of pale blue ice.’
      • ‘He led me through a maze of hallways and finally stopped at a door.’
      • ‘I walked through the maze of passages, taking whichever bearing I felt pulled towards.’
      • ‘Amidst these, through a complex maze of natural stone bridges and walkways, was a smaller peak.’
      • ‘The insects' snacking patterns in the branch create a complex maze of chambers.’
      • ‘He led them through a winding maze of streets and alleyways, and finally they reached a clearing.’
      • ‘Colin reluctantly runs out the front entrance and escapes through the maze of alleyways.’
      • ‘Three hundred people lived in the maze of complex interwoven passages for six years during the American war.’
      • ‘The roots of the tree were gigantic and twisted about the garden creating a tangled maze.’
      • ‘She threatened and then ran off, back into the maze of the castle passages.’
      labyrinth, network of paths
      complex network, labyrinth, web, tangle, warren, mesh, jungle, snarl, imbroglio
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A confusing mass of information.
      ‘a maze of petty regulations’
      • ‘The Museum's imaginative mix of social history and artefacts provides a maze of information.’
      • ‘Negotiating the corporate maze can test the mettle of even the most resourceful individuals.’
      • ‘The complex maze of pensions provision can leave many people scratching their heads about which way to go.’
      • ‘How could such a character emerge from a maze of business and legal puzzles and still be elected to the highest office of a western democracy?’
      • ‘In such a situation, an ordinary individual finds himself in a maze of perplexing notions and ideas.’
      • ‘Who is accountable for what in the EU's bureaucratic maze?’
      • ‘To pretty much anyone this lot represents a bewildering, tangled, confused maze of information.’
      • ‘But for months afterward, the title to the building was lost in a bureaucratic maze.’
      • ‘So here's a guide to help you through the complex maze of state support for pensioners.’
      • ‘In the end, the Irish troops found themselves utterly confused as they became pawns in a frustrating bureaucratic maze.’
      • ‘Nuggets of information are valuable, but sorting through that maze is a waste of time.’
      • ‘Marketers need to understand how to navigate the maze of contradictory consumer attitudes and behavior.’

verb

be mazed
dialect, archaic
  • Be dazed and confused.

    ‘she was still mazed with the drug she had taken’
    • ‘Beyond this garden, abrupt, there was a grey stone wall overgrown with velvet moss that uprose as, gazing, Matthew stood long, all mazed and blinking, to see this place so eerie and fair.’
    • ‘He was regarded with suspicion, considered an outsider and a very strange young man, being called ‘funny’ or even ‘mazed’ by the locals.’

Origin

Middle English (denoting delirium or delusion): probably from the base of amaze, of which the verb is a shortening.

Pronunciation

maze

/meɪz/