Definition of marzipan in English:

marzipan

Pronunciation /ˈmɑːzɪpan//ˌmɑːzɪˈpan/

noun

mass noun
  • 1A sweet yellow or white paste of ground almonds, sugar, and egg whites, used to coat cakes or to make confectionery.

    • ‘They make a little mousse then they make the child's name from the thinnest layer of marzipan.’
    • ‘But more to the point, almonds mean marzipan, which also originated in the Orient.’
    • ‘The French prepare marzipan by combining ground almonds with sugar syrup boiled to the soft ball stage.’
    • ‘Bakery windows were crammed with marzipan pumpkins and spidery confections.’
    • ‘One factory, which produced machines for making waffles and marzipan before the war, had been entirely converted to munitions.’
    • ‘It makes icings, marzipan and nut products, which it supplies to caterers and supermarkets.’
    • ‘I ate so many dates stuffed with almonds or marzipan, I felt I was going to turn into one.’
    • ‘Even if you cannot bear the thought of messing around with marzipan and icing you will probably enjoy making the cake itself.’
    • ‘In a small bowl, knead the remaining almonds, marzipan, and lime zest and juice until well-combined.’
    • ‘Cakes and desserts made of fruits and marzipan, a sweet almond paste, are sold in pastry shops and on the streets.’
    • ‘Anyway, it turns out that underneath the marzipan and icing sugar of his gorgeous first birthday cake there lies a fine old-fashioned Dundee cake, perfect for dunking.’
    • ‘They are also asking for 15 kg of marzipan, 15 kg of fondant icing and 800 paper napkins.’
    • ‘Add water to mixture in the processor, one tablespoon at a time, until the paste has the consistency of marzipan.’
    • ‘It is distinguished by the use of marzipan or almond paste.’
    • ‘Elaborate use of food-colouring, marzipan, other decorative edibles and props meant that every cake was both memorable and intensely personal.’
    • ‘I have a particularly uncontrollable weakness for marzipan which made these desserts my favourite.’
    • ‘The dessert course of fruits, figs, almonds, fritters and marzipan was often eaten in a separate banqueting room or house built for the purpose so that the Great Hall could be cleared.’
    • ‘In the larder stood a huge Christmas cake covered with marzipan and thick white icing, which Beth had baked several months ago.’
    • ‘When baked between layers of aromatic almond marzipan, I can't imagine a better summertime dessert.’
    • ‘A Simnel cake is a rich fruitcake baked with a layer of marzipan in the middle and topped with a layer of marzipan as well.’
    1. 1.1count noun A sweet or small cake made of or coated with marzipan.
      ‘pralines, chocolates, and marzipans’
      • ‘Their famous Champagne Truffles, pralines and marzipans are hand-made and flown in weekly from Switzerland.’
      • ‘That includes the ever-popular plum cake, plum pudding and Yule log, marzipans glittering with a coat of sugar, and delightful creations such as nougat, truffle and gateaux.’
      • ‘It was clear that the merry season of Yule logs, plum pudding, fruitcakes, marzipans, macaroons and roast turkey had not yet come to a close.’
      • ‘Do not omit to taste the traditional skopelitians flavours such as the cheese pie and the delicious marzipans.’

verb

[with object]usually as adjective marzipanned
  • Cover with marzipan.

    ‘a marzipanned cake’
    • ‘Leave the marzipanned cake, uncovered, to dry in a warm dry room.’
    • ‘Use them for your home-made marzipanned fruit cake or to liven up a shop-brought cake.’
    • ‘If the cake is not marzipanned, brush it with apricot glaze before positioning the icing to ensure it does not slip.’
    • ‘There's something rather satisfying about marzipanning a cake, I always think.’
    • ‘Gently and carefully peel the mould away from the cake – you will have a perfectly defined marzipanned cake.’

Origin

Late 15th century (as marchpane): from Italian marzapane, perhaps from Arabic. The form marchpane (influenced by March and obsolete pain ‘bread’) was more usual until the late 19th century, when marzipan (influenced by German Marzipan) displaced it.

Pronunciation

marzipan

/ˈmɑːzɪpan//ˌmɑːzɪˈpan/