Definition of Martial in English:

Martial

proper noun

  • (c.40–c.104 ad), Roman epigrammatist, born in Spain; Latin name Marcus Valerius Martialis. His fifteen books of epigrams, in a variety of metres, reflect all facets of Roman life.

Pronunciation:

Martial

/ˈmɑːʃ(ə)l/

Definition of martial in English:

martial

adjective

  • Relating to fighting or war:

    ‘martial bravery’
    • ‘Too often, the country seems to be engrossed in a mythic, heroic narrative of patriotic, martial prowess.’
    • ‘Male viewers would have seen him as an exemplar of heroic and martial prowess.’
    • ‘The British, impressed by the martial spirit of the Gurkhas, began recruiting them into the Indian army.’
    • ‘In fact, as the historians are beginning to reveal, there is nothing new about the warrior's dream of martial perfection.’
    • ‘He was unarmed, and carried no military gear or other indicators of martial status.’
    • ‘Their martial glory reflects a greater glory that they both serve and exemplify at its highest.’
    • ‘Once, Englishmen took Henry V's exhortations to martial self-sacrifice as inspiring.’
    • ‘Sparta was a martial society, which did away with any sickly child at birth.’
    • ‘In the opening part there are fight scenes woven around him to introduce us to his martial skills.’
    • ‘When not walking, Kevin would practice his martial skills in his practice room, focussing on them and nothing else for hours at a time.’
    • ‘Both genres are based on stories of different kinds of martial quest.’
    • ‘The martial, or fighting arts are among humankind's oldest avocations.’
    • ‘This injury left him unfit for military service but did not seem to affect his martial ability.’
    • ‘There are few stunts and only rudimentary fight sequences, dependent upon fire power rather than martial artistry.’
    • ‘This fusion of martial and performing arts is sure to kindle the curiosity of the young, who adapt easily to innovations.’
    • ‘He has done a great service in bringing more attention to the western martial tradition and history.’
    • ‘His skill with the staff was incredible, as was to be expected of the prince's martial education.’
    • ‘Dreams of martial glory are hardly uncommon in 19-year-olds all over the world.’
    • ‘The production is more than a simple demonstration of martial qualities.’
    • ‘Some may be obscure to people who haven't read much about martial culture or military history.’
    military, soldierly, soldier-like, army, naval, fighting, service
    warlike, combative, belligerent, bellicose, aggressive, pugnacious, gung-ho, militant, militaristic
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, or from Latin martialis, from Mars, Mart- (see Mars).

Pronunciation:

martial

/ˈmɑːʃ(ə)l/