Main definitions of marrow in English

: marrow1marrow2

marrow1

noun

  • 1British A long white-fleshed gourd with green skin, which is eaten as a vegetable.

    • ‘Unripe fruits are cooked as a vegetable in the same way as marrows.’
    • ‘In addition to cereals the Greeks used figs, grapes, pomegranates, spinach, marrows, celery, nettles, hyacinth bulbs, artichokes, asparagus and honey.’
    • ‘We grow all manner of vegetables from cabbages and carrots to marrows.’
    • ‘The annual Giant Vegetable Competition is approaching, and the folk who grow carrots and pumpkins and marrows in their back yards are fearful of the voracious rabbits that threaten their produce.’
    • ‘Other specialist bags have been developed especially for salads and vegetables including even marrows and courgettes.’
    • ‘So, whether you call it a striped gourd, a marrow, or a zucchini, you might notice that they are quite plentiful at this time of the year.’
    • ‘Ronde de Nice squash, hard-skinned and as smooth as a cricket ball will bake well with a dab of garlic butter, and yet the young marrows would be just as good.’
    • ‘Behind him, seven-year-old Jordan stood in awe with his grandmother, admiring the enormous marrows.’
    • ‘Courgettes are actually baby marrows, just picked earlier from the plant.’
    • ‘The book devotes 30 pages to cucurbits, from giant pumpkins through marrows, zucchinis and cucumbers to back - scratching loofahs.’
    • ‘The British will bet on virtually anything from the size of marrows, through slug racing, to how long it takes to run round the quadrangle of an Oxford College.’
    • ‘Two hours later and I was still tousle-haired and wearing an apron over my pajamas, but the pot was bubbling away on the stove and I was clearing up tomato skins and marrow seeds from the worktop.’
    • ‘Horticultural societies and shows, which began 200 years ago, still display prize marrows, giant leeks and perfect chrysanthemums.’
    • ‘I spotted the first of the really big marrows, and even a small pumpkin the other day.’
    • ‘Pragmatics perhaps explains cucurbita pepo's lack of popularity: if one assumes they are always merely marrows, who would want to eat them?’
    • ‘Glaze the baby marrows and peeled carrots in a pan with honey.’
    • ‘A thousand plastic ducks and 50 giant marrows were on show as almost £3,000 was raised for charity.’
    • ‘This is a land of festivals, more than any other, whether it means tossing cabers, weighing marrows or staging opera in country houses.’
    • ‘Lots of vegetables should be ready to harvest now including marrows, onions and sweetcorn.’
    • ‘I didn't really eat the marrow because I was so full.’
  • 2The plant of the gourd family which produces marrows.

    • ‘I wouldn't mind if they had a little nibble now and then, but no, they've got to have the whole thing. 2 pumpkin plants, 3 lettuce seedlings and damage to my marrow plant.’
  • 3[mass noun] A soft fatty substance in the cavities of bones, in which blood cells are produced.

    [as modifier] ‘marrow donors’
    ‘a bone marrow transplant’
    • ‘He donated bone marrow at a hospital in London before it was transported to America.’
    • ‘Overall it is very well tolerated, with a low incidence of bone marrow suppression.’
    • ‘His topic was the regeneration of damaged heart muscle, by use of bone marrow stem cells.’
    • ‘Stem cells have been isolated from the central nervous system, bone marrow, and blood of adults.’
    • ‘The bone marrow cells will be collected using a needle and syringe, with no cutting or stitching involved.’
    • ‘It is usually found in the lymph nodes but can also spread to involve other organs such as the spleen and bone marrow.’
    • ‘White blood cells are produced by the bone marrow, the soft spongy centre of bones.’
    • ‘Autologous bone marrow transplantation was being viewed in a different light.’
    • ‘A bag containing the retrovirus was connected to a bag of his bone marrow.’
    • ‘For this reason, close relatives are often the donors of choice in bone marrow transplantation.’
    • ‘Autologous transplants are stem cells from the patient's own bone marrow or peripheral blood.’
    • ‘His sister was found to be the one-in-a-million bone marrow match he needed.’
    • ‘During a transplant, healthy bone marrow will be fed into your blood stream.’
    • ‘The bone marrow helps regulate the number of white blood cells in the body.’
    • ‘Stem cells are cells taken from bone marrow which have the ability to grow into several different types of tissue.’
    • ‘If you require a bone marrow transplant a compatible donor will need to be found.’
    • ‘In some cases you may be able to exchange cards or letters with the person who received your donated bone marrow.’
    • ‘In general, magnetic resonance is excellent for imaging soft tissue and bone marrow.’
    • ‘Definitive treatment of the disorder relies on reconstituting the patient's bone marrow.’
    • ‘In other areas, such as blood and bone marrow donation, living donors are the norm.’
  • 4The essential part of something.

    ‘such men were the marrow of the organization’
    • ‘Also, my account cannot be complete, but it will contain most of the essential marrow of our many conversations.’
    • ‘The night provides the vital marrow for all things creative.’
    • ‘I knew a profound new question challenged me: Is love the essential marrow of our humanness?’
    • ‘I'll attempt to cull his posts down to the essential marrow and bring it to the attention of my own limited readership.’
    • ‘He wisely sifted out four steps which he discerned to be those which contained the essential marrow, and which were of the highest value in actual practice.’
    essence, core, nucleus, pith, kernel, heart, centre, soul, spirit, quintessence, gist, substance, sum and substance, meat, nub, stuff
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English mearg, mærg (in marrow), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch merg and German Mark. marrow dates from the early 19th century.

Pronunciation:

marrow

/ˈmarəʊ/

Main definitions of marrow in English

: marrow1marrow2

marrow2

(also marrer, marra)

noun

Northern english, Scottish
  • 1A friend, companion, or workmate (often used as a form of address)

    ‘come here, marrer, we need to talk’
    • ‘He came to the face of operations. 'How's things here, marrow?' he asked.’
    • ‘There is a widespread superstition amongst Durham miners that they are always forewarned of disasters, often by their old "marras" who have been killed in the pit.’
    • ‘My favorite Red Lion patrons were Avery and her marra, Avery, a couple with the only similarity, besides the same name of course, being that they both went to the same school without ever knowing each other.’
    • ‘Our own battalion was predominantly Cumbrian, and the men from the west coast called each other 'marrow', pronounced marra.’
    • ‘'Deputy seems to have the wind up,' said Jack. 'They all have,' said his marrow. 'Can't make it out why they're shoving the timber in.'’
    • ‘Katrine is a leddy born - there's nae aulder or prouder stock in the land - and ye're the oy o' the miller o' the Rood-foot, and ye seek to make her your marrow.’
    • ‘While in the army most Geordies I met called their best friends their marrer.’
    • ‘Instead of saying friend or pal they would refer to their marra.’
    • ‘He and his marrer were hewing when a large stone fell from the roof and injured Roberts' back, he died an hour after being taken home.’
    • ‘It is this sense of loyalty and brotherhood, found amongst miners the country over, that led to the tragic deaths of two brave men who would not give up their ‘marrer’ for lost.’
    companion, boon companion, bosom friend, best friend, close friend, intimate, confidante, confidant, familiar, soul mate, alter ego, second self, shadow, playmate, playfellow, classmate, schoolmate, workmate, ally, comrade, associate
    View synonyms
  • 2Something that forms a pair with something else; a counterpart or twin.

    • ‘Mind you, he was a smart man, my father. None his marrow when it came to making an old mare look as young and lifey as a two-year-old, tarring its grey hairs.’
    • ‘He is the very marrow of John Strathbourne as he was when we fought side by side.’

Origin

Late Middle English: probably from Old Norse margr many, also friendly, communicative.

Pronunciation:

marrow

/ˈmarə/