Main definitions of maroon in English

: maroon1maroon2

maroon1

adjective

  • Of a brownish-red colour.

    ‘ornate maroon and gold wallpaper’
    • ‘The walls were painted a deep, peaceful maroon colour, and there were paintings of Italian landscapes and other things tacked to the walls.’
    • ‘She led him, silently, to a large room with maroon curtains and cherry furniture.’
    • ‘A few rugs were place around the room, deep gold and laced with maroon edges to match the upholstery of the couch.’
    • ‘Mixed with other, deep maroon flowers and streaks of grey foliage plants, scarlet blooms drift through borders.’
    • ‘At the right was a living room covered with maroon wallpaper and gold moon and stars.’
    • ‘Besides the regular reddish maroon colour, there are cream pastes to leave pink, blue, violet, magenta designs on the skin.’
    • ‘The wrap colors include a multi blue, black, white, red, turquoise, purple, jade green, navy blue, gold and a maroon type of color.’
    • ‘The choir's maroon robes and gold collars shined in the sun, as they walked into the gym.’
    • ‘The walls were a dull maroon colour, and made up of hard terraplate.’
    • ‘The maroon colours were engulfed in a light blue light.’
    • ‘I was in my maroon traveling suit with the gold trimmings and a maroon velvet hat with matching feather secure on my head.’
    • ‘I love the gold silk layer under the maroon chiffon.’
    • ‘His gaze fell upon a woman in her thirties wearing a maroon suit with a gold pin on her lapel.’
    • ‘Her friends room was quite modern; the carpet had been dyed a rich maroon colour, the walls were plainly white and the roof painted black.’
    • ‘Walking down the path that led to the gates, a man dressed in a blue and maroon robe with gold trimming approached them.’
    • ‘Some farmers cultivate bi-colour flowers like light yellow with maroon blotches, deep crimson-edged yellow, gold and red bicolour.’
    • ‘They soon reached the main quarters, where a plump little man wearing a maroon suit was sitting and counting a pile of gold coins.’
    • ‘A neat maroon carpet with gold lining was on the floor.’
    • ‘Police say a 16-year-old girl was stopped by two men driving a maroon sedan around 12.15 pm.’
    • ‘She found herself in a rather tatty entrance hallway, with new maroon flock wallpaper and, less impressively, peeling paint and worn carpeting.’

noun

  • 1[mass noun] A brownish-red colour.

    ‘the hat is available in either white or maroon’
    [count noun] ‘cold pinks, purples, and maroons’
    • ‘We seem to be going for maroon, blue and creamy white this year.’
    • ‘A few flags waved from their poles, sporting the Institution's signature colors - maroon and white.’
    • ‘Everyone looks at him as the stripes of reddish brownish maroon streak his face.’
    • ‘She looked to be around my age with very dark brown hair that was tinted in maroon.’
    • ‘The furniture in the room was either white or maroon, Miranda's favorite colors.’
    • ‘It seems to be duller than usual; the grey buildings have a hint of yellow to them and the sky is a pale grey colour, infused with maroon.’
    • ‘All roads into the town will be a sea of green and red and maroon and white as another generation answer the tribal call.’
    • ‘Camille was in a mostly brown and white dress, while her cousins Miranda and Riley were primarily, if not totally, in purple or maroon, respectively.’
    • ‘My heart twisted painfully and the marble floor below me seemed to spin into an incomprehensible blur of beige and maroon.’
    • ‘Red, maroon, yellow, blue are good colours for neckties, patterned or solid.’
    • ‘The banner features the colours of the local clubs-green, gold, white and maroon.’
    • ‘Last Sunday was officially declared a day of no rest in Ballinrobe, as local painters and decorators coloured the town in maroon and yellow.’
    • ‘It is bright maroon and has white spots all over its petals.’
    • ‘From my limited knowledge I also found the colour unusual - a sort of brownish maroon I would say from memory.’
    • ‘Anyway, very few flowers in my yard flaunt the single colours - bright yellow, soft pink, browny maroon, crimson - black - of my original sowing.’
    • ‘You can use maroon, grayish tones of pinks and whites to achieve the same results.’
    • ‘The ones in the family room are maroon, teal and white. The hardware in the living room is gold plastic.’
    • ‘The fans created a haze of maroon and white as hundreds joined together in simultaneously swirling their scarves above their heads.’
    • ‘The schools new colours are maroon, royal blue and yellow.’
    • ‘They come with many different leaf colours, from maroon and cream, to copper and lime, usually with interesting variegations.’
  • 2British A firework that makes a loud bang, used as a signal or warning.

    • ‘The borough council has arranged for a maroon to be fired from the main council offices, which will be followed by a minute of silence.’
    • ‘Celebrations start at midday, with the firing of a maroon to signal the beginning of the party.’
    • ‘Two maroons are fired from the Lifeboat Station to alert the town's RNLI crew whenever they are required for an emergency call out - also known as a 'shout'.’
    • ‘With a crowded beach the Coastguards fired a maroon to signal the run down the beach from the Inn to the sea at 11.45am.’
    • ‘The crack of a maroon then broke the silence and brought the marshals forward to light the 824 torches, which a group of the town's men and boys had spent three months making.’
    • ‘War veterans were left fuming in the seaside town after lifeboatmen told them that they would not be able to fire maroons at the beginning and end of the silence on advice from RNLI headquarters.’
    • ‘In Trafford, the silence was signalled by the firing of maroons at Streford, Sale, Altrincham, Urmston and Partington, where services also took place.’
    • ‘Many will signal the start and end of the silence by firing maroons.’
    • ‘Bells burst forth into joyful chimes, maroons were exploded, bands paraded the streets followed by cheering crowds of soldiers and civilians and London generally gave itself up wholeheartedly to rejoicing.’
    • ‘A countdown led by the Wales Tourist Board chairman, a coastguard maroon and one of the loudest fireworks that the fireworks company could muster, sent the swim on its way.’
    • ‘For years the start and end of the two minutes silence across the town has been signalled by the firing of a maroon - a firework-like device that produces a deafening boom.’
    • ‘Shoppers and people just passing through Victoria Square stopped what they were doing as maroons fired from the roof of the town hall marked the beginning and end of the silence.’
    • ‘It banned the supply to the public of aerial shells, aerial maroons, shells-in-mortar and maroons-in-mortar, bangers, mini-rockets and fireworks of ‘erratic flight’.’
    • ‘In Manchester, a maroon was fired from the Town Hall to mark the start of the silence, and all take-offs and landings at the airport were put on hold until it was over.’
    • ‘Originally from the north Norfolk coast, he was bought up with the tradition that when the maroons went up, the whole community downed tools and rushed to help.’

Origin

Late 17th century (in the sense ‘chestnut’): from French marron chestnut, via Italian from medieval Greek maraon. The sense relating to colour dates from the late 18th century.

Pronunciation:

maroon

/məˈruːn/

Main definitions of maroon in English

: maroon1maroon2

maroon2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Leave (someone) trapped and alone in an inaccessible place, especially an island.

    ‘a novel about schoolboys marooned on a desert island’
    • ‘A few minutes later the ship was sailing away north, knowing that they might be marooning their shipmates with them, but knowing that they had no other choice.’
    • ‘Ostensibly it is the story of a group of schoolboys marooned on a desert island who revert to being as savage as their forbears.’
    • ‘Here also, around 10 villages have been marooned and are being provided rations from the air.’
    • ‘There were several landslides in the area, where four workers were marooned.’
    • ‘She remembered her father telling her tales of pirates marooning their captains and awful things of that sort.’
    • ‘Having abandoned England she is marooned in a country with which her native country is at war.’
    • ‘He described to two children how he and a heathen landowner, out fishing, had been marooned on a rock during a storm.’
    • ‘When the plane's engine blows, they crash and are marooned in the middle of the tundra with only a handful of supplies.’
    • ‘The book opens with the introduction of a small group of English boys that are marooned on an island.’
    • ‘On the way to South America, the ship sinks and he is marooned on an island.’
    • ‘As the clock inched towards midnight a storm struck the island marooning everyone there.’
    • ‘The only thing that had kept him from going insane when he was marooned was the beauty of the island.’
    • ‘Journalists who flew ten nautical miles up the river mouth saw between 500 and 1000 marooned people.’
    • ‘Up to eight cars broke down in the floods with residents stepping in to help marooned motorists.’
    • ‘On the second voyage, Sindbad is marooned on an island, but with the help of a giant bird, he is able to collect many diamonds before returning home.’
    • ‘Earlier this year he spoke of the irony of having so many women interested in him when he is marooned on the island.’
    • ‘His vessels, rotted by shipworm, were abandoned in Jamaica, where Columbus was marooned for a year.’
    • ‘The emergency rations consumed, we were marooned, starving in a hostile land.’
    • ‘The life raft was spotted around three miles off the coast, and the five marooned sailors were winched to safety by the Navy aircraft.’
    • ‘She stumbled on to an island where she was marooned.’
    strand, leave stranded, cast away, cast ashore, abandon, leave behind, leave, leave in the lurch, desert, turn one's back on, leave isolated
    leave high and dry
    forsake
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 18th century: from Maroon, originally in the form marooned ‘lost in the wilds’.

Pronunciation:

maroon

/məˈruːn/

Main definitions of maroon in English

: maroon1maroon2

Maroon

noun

  • A member of any of various communities in parts of the Caribbean who were originally descended from escaped slaves. In the 18th century Jamaican Maroons fought two wars against the British, both of which ended with treaties affirming the independence of the Maroons.

    • ‘Fugitive slaves from the West Indies or Guyana, or their descendants, were called Maroons.’
    • ‘Many of the Maroons (who are descended from escaped black African slaves) have more than one wife.’
    • ‘Nanny was the greatest of the generals of the Maroons, runaway slaves who forged a society and an identity in the weedy-thick hill country of the Jamaican hinterland.’
    • ‘By 1770, five thousand to six thousand Maroons or runaway slaves were living in the jungle.’
    • ‘The first Maroons were African slaves left behind by the Spanish when the British military took Jamaica from them in 1655.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from French marron feral, from Spanish cimarrón wild, (as a noun) runaway slave.

Pronunciation:

Maroon

/məˈruːn/