Main definitions of marmite in English

: marmite1Marmite2

marmite1

Pronunciation /mɑːˈmiːt//ˈmɑːmʌɪt/

noun

  • An earthenware cooking container.

    • ‘The evening meal was slowly cooking in a marmite suspended from a hook.’
    • ‘Place in a marmite, deep casserole or Dutch oven with a tight fitting lid. Then wrap the casserole completely in foil.’
    • ‘Heat the olive oil in the marmite, then drain the chick-peas again and add them.’
    • ‘The marmitako is a simple dish that fishermen used to cook in a marmite (a small cooking pot);reason for the name, marmitako.’
    • ‘A garniture of turnips, carrots and potatoes cut in a tournage are cooked in a marmite till tender and served with the beef and sauces.’

Origin

Early 19th century: French, from Old French marmite ‘hypocritical’, with reference to the hidden contents of the lidded pot, from marmotter ‘to mutter’ + mite ‘cat’.

Pronunciation

marmite

/mɑːˈmiːt//ˈmɑːmʌɪt/

Main definitions of marmite in English

: marmite1Marmite2

Marmite2

noun

mass nountrademark in UK
  • 1A dark savoury spread made from yeast extract and vegetable extract.

    • ‘I always take Marmite and ketchup abroad; I can't travel without my Marmite.’
    • ‘They are moving away from the baked beans and Marmite sandwiches-era of old and are demanding far more adventurous fare from their campus canteens, says a new report.’
    • ‘My mum used to love Marmite, but I couldn't even stand the smell.’
    • ‘What I have found in practice is that people who like to eat Marmite have symptoms that suggest they have too much yeast in their system.’
    • ‘Many enjoy a bread spread called Marmite, a dark-colored yeast extract with a salty taste.’
    1. 1.1 Used in reference to something that tends to arouse strongly positive or negative reactions rather than indifference.
      ‘the styling is ‘Marmite’—some hate it, many love it’
      ‘a proper Marmite sitcom, which people are either utterly loving or totally despising’
      • ‘He is a Marmite kind of Mayor.’
      • ‘There is a possibility that they'll become the Marmite of Manchester's music scene and half of the local audience will find them impossible to love.’
      • ‘Contact lenses are a Marmite issue, some people can deal with the hassle of poking yourself in the eye early in morning before a race, and some can't.’
      • ‘He may have been dubbed 'comedy Marmite' but 639,000 fans flocked to see his show.’
      • ‘Acknowledging that Art Brut are a marmite band, DiS declares itself in the pro-Art Brut camp with a 9/10 review.’
      • ‘They are 'Marmite people'. Very little goes a long way.’

Origin

Early 20th century: from marmite.

Pronunciation

Marmite

/ˈmɑːmʌɪt/