Definition of marinade in English:

marinade

Pronunciation /ˈmarɪneɪd//ˌmarɪˈneɪd/

noun

Pronunciation /ˈmarɪneɪd//ˌmarɪˈneɪd/
  • A mixture of oil, wine, spices, or similar ingredients, in which meat, fish, or other food is soaked before cooking in order to flavour or soften it.

    ‘remove the trout from the marinade with a slotted spoon’
    • ‘Tuna is a bland fish and benefits from a marinade to infuse flavour.’
    • ‘Wine marinades are a cook's flexible friend: they flavour meat or fish, can tenderise it and stop it drying out.’
    • ‘Use herbs, spices, fresh vegetables, and fat-free marinades to season meat.’
    • ‘Mix the skin and the seeds with some orange juice for a tenderizing marinade for seafood or meats.’
    • ‘Frozen foods resist freezer burn better, and marinades penetrate meats more effectively.’
    • ‘Spices and marinades of every description are at work here, drenching the Persian chicken kebabs or injecting an extra kick into the house special, lentil soup.’
    • ‘Turn the fish over in the marinade to get it well coated.’
    • ‘Flavor houses are, not surprisingly, working overtime to produce ingredients for marinades, dry seasonings, and rubs.’
    • ‘Don't reuse the marinade from raw meat or poultry on cooked food unless it's boiled first to destroy any harmful bacteria.’
    • ‘But do use a teaspoon or two in marinades or salad dressings or instead of sugar in tea.’
    • ‘From Cumberland sausage, meat and fish marinades, home baking, beer and much more, there will be something to make every mouth water from 9am - 3pm.’
    • ‘A tenderizing marinade must contain an acidic ingredient such as lemon juice, vinegar, wine or yogurt.’
    • ‘Seal and press the marinade into the meat and then refrigerate for four hours or overnight.’
    • ‘With all those powerfully pungent aromas of smoke and strongly flavoured marinades, don't waste your money offering expensive fine wines with all their delicate secrets to unfold.’
    • ‘If some of the marinade is to be used as a sauce on the cooked food, reserve a portion of the marinade before putting raw meat and poultry in it.’
    • ‘Use them to dress salads, to replace lemon in zippy desserts and beverages, and to complement meat, poultry, and fish; just splash them on the meat or in marinades and sauces.’
    • ‘Wine marinades help meat, fish, and game keep a short time in hot weather.’
    • ‘It can be used as a base ingredient for glazes and marinades, as well.’
    • ‘The marinade for the grilled meat and seafood is delectable and ingredients are a well-kept secret, as we were unable to get it from the staff.’
    • ‘When you're ready to start cooking, strain the beef, reserving the marinade and the other ingredients.’
    brine, vinegar
    View synonyms

verb

Pronunciation /ˈmarɪneɪd/
  • another term for marinate
    • ‘Such thin slices can better absorb sweet and fragrant juices in which they are marinaded.’
    • ‘Of course, you could take a portable barbecue with you and prepare some delicious and colourful meat, fish or vegetable kebabs which you have marinaded in your fridge overnight.’
    • ‘The mix of fruit having been marinaded in brandy, each mouthful, like each piece of music, is packed with ingredients which leave a very pleasant taste in one's mouth.’
    • ‘It has, in effect, been marinaded in blood and tastes unspeakable.’
    • ‘I once barbecued a whole fillet of beef marinaded in a bottle of Jack Daniel's and enclosed in tinfoil.’
    • ‘The meat is cut into long thin strips and marinaded with natural flavourings and preservatives before being dried at their new company, called Bare Earth, at Melmerby, near Ripon.’
    • ‘The Scottish sirloin is marinaded in orange, lime, oregano and chillies and then pan-fried.’
    • ‘Lunch in tapas bars is a Spanish treat, serving tasty portions of tortilla, fresh prawns, marinaded red peppers and other morsels of local food.’
    • ‘I didn't marinade them, I didn't baste them, I didn't check the temperature of the barbecue, and I didn't get to taste them.’
    • ‘I had marinaded it in orange juice, marjoram and chives.’
    • ‘We also learn why vacuum packing gives meat a nasty metallic tang - it cannot breathe but ends up marinading in oxidised blood.’
    • ‘Preferring chicken breast to legs, I used meat alone, cut into generous pieces and marinaded in the sauce overnight.’
    • ‘Yassa, found throughout W. and C. Africa, is chicken or fish marinaded in lemon or lime juice, grilled on a barbecue, and then fried with onions and simmered with the marinade.’
    • ‘Add the pork fillets to the marinade and allow to marinade for 12 to 24 hours.’
    • ‘The meat had been marinaded in herbs and cheese overnight, so that it not only tasted tender but also sent off a lasting aroma on your tongue.’
    • ‘We speculated that it could have been marinaded in soy sauce, because there was a lovely, salty tang to the skin.’
    • ‘This is absolutely perfect, of course, old barrels are made of oak, and marinaded in sherry and whisky, so all the flavour imparted have much to recommend them.’
    • ‘If you ask some cooks today why they marinade, they will tell you that it's to add flavor.’
    • ‘After being marinaded in cumin and oregano, they are dipped in crushed tortilla chips so that, even though they are grilled, they taste like they've been fried.’
    • ‘Nothing was marinaded but the box included chutney, lettuce, organic rolls and sustainable Welsh coal.’

Origin

Late 17th century (as a verb): from French, from Spanish marinada, via marinar ‘pickle in brine’ from marino (see marina).

Pronunciation

marinade

Noun/ˈmarɪneɪd//ˌmarɪˈneɪd/

marinade

Verb/ˈmarɪneɪd/