Definition of march to (the beat of) a different tune (or drummer) in English:

march to (the beat of) a different tune (or drummer)

phrase

informal
  • Consciously adopt a different approach or attitude to the majority of people.

    ‘he has always marched to a different tune but this time his perversity may be his undoing’
    • ‘Admiral Rickover, Peter Drucker, and Georges Doriot always marched to a different drummer and got the acclaim of the crowd.’
    • ‘Since his college days, Rice has been seen as someone who marched to the beat of a different drummer.’
    • ‘During the go-go days of the late 1990s, when many business thinkers found themselves seduced by the idea that everything is new in the new economy, Jim Collins marched to a different drummer.’
    • ‘A professional woman in her 50s said she feels almost ‘invisible’ a lot of the time and that the better jobs or promotions seem to go to those in her company that don't march to a different drummer.’
    • ‘Now Michael Deaver authors a personal portrait of the former president he says has always marched to a different drummer.’
    • ‘‘He marched to a different drummer,’ says his colleague Becker.’
    • ‘Unless you enjoy marching to a different drummer, stick with right betting, avoid wrong betting, and join the tribe.’
    • ‘‘When I walked the picket lines, I really believed that we, as a people, marched to the beat of a different drummer,’ Lyons says.’
    • ‘Those who want exegetical help in the interpretation of a specific text will discover that this commentary marches to a different drummer.’
    • ‘Lennon is believed to favour a return to Congress and is viewed as a moderate, but the overwhelming message from the conference of over 400 delegates was that the general secretary is marching to a different tune from his troops.’