Main definitions of march in English

: march1march2March3

march1

verb

  • 1no object, usually with adverbial of direction Walk in a military manner with a regular measured tread.

    ‘thousands marched behind the coffin’
    • ‘Tens of thousands marched with Spartacus, and a succession of Roman armies were crushed.’
    • ‘The band has been invited to march in the annual Military and Veterans Parade in Weymouth on June 20.’
    • ‘They marched out in regular formation, peeling off two by two at each main street to patrol their beats on foot.’
    • ‘Dressed in his formal uniform, he marched in precise military style to the Royal Palace.’
    • ‘She talked off how the military marched around the streets and how unfairly they treated the people.’
    • ‘The soldiers then marched out of the palace gates to the delight of the crowds.’
    • ‘Volunteers from this military body now marched to Carthage and stormed the jail.’
    • ‘We both went to schools where people marched around as military cadets.’
    • ‘All had marched at least a thousand miles, some much more.’
    • ‘We hear the shouts of the military squadron marching up the hills.’
    • ‘Private military personnel marched with the US Army first into Somalia, then Bosnia, and Kosovo.’
    • ‘Below them, the Imperial Army marched along the road, plumes of smoke rising from the cratered remains of the Star encampments.’
    • ‘Military men marched in a circular review, saluting Kim.’
    • ‘Lord Jonathan entered the castle along with the other knights and soldiers who marched in unison behind them.’
    • ‘I remember marching behind the band on my debut against Cork and saying to myself, ‘What am I doing here?’’
    • ‘The Spartans attempted a military response, and marched against the leading revolutionary state, Mantinea.’
    • ‘When Emmet first heard this song he is reputed to have said ‘oh that I were at the head of twenty thousand men marching to that air’.’
    • ‘Thousands of soldiers were walking around, marching, much like in the present day military manner.’
    • ‘No more marching in to military music, no women teachers, new school caps with a badge in yellow which we raised when we met teachers out of school bounds.’
    • ‘Kids were forced to rise before dawn, perform rigorous exercises, and march like soldiers.’
    stride, walk, troop, step, pace, tread
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Walk quickly and with determination.
      ‘without a word she marched from the room’
      • ‘Licking my lips at the wondrous prospect of a day jam-packed with data entry madness, I marched onwards determinedly.’
      • ‘He plucked James from the ground swiftly, then turned and marched quickly over to the shattered window.’
      • ‘We were approximately sixty yards from the front door - the main entrance when a woman was coming towards - she was marching very quickly towards us.’
      • ‘Without saying a word he marched right out of the park leaving Rebecca to stare at him.’
      • ‘He struggled to keep up with her as she marched along the road.’
      • ‘If all else fails, determinedly march up to onlookers with camera in hand.’
      • ‘I marched determinedly to my homeroom class and saw Terry at the wall next to the door.’
      • ‘I turned around and started marching back our room, confident that Charles would never bug me again.’
      • ‘At each obstacle she had held her head high and marched past it, determined to defeat the impossible.’
      • ‘She nodded the moment I saw Dr. Kay enter the room and come marching over to us.’
      • ‘Jason-Steve smiled as Evan marched with a determined stance to find the phone.’
      • ‘Saturday morning came, and we quickly marched out the door and towards the Metro stop.’
      • ‘I thought I saw Eric flush, but he marched off too quickly for me to be certain.’
      • ‘She marches into the training room where the Product Manager is giving a training session.’
      • ‘She clenched her fists and marched back to her room without a word.’
      • ‘With these words, Simone marched forward with anger filling inside her and her two sisters trailing behind.’
      • ‘With a determined step she marched purposely toward the blackened doorway.’
      • ‘She quickly turned and began marching towards her apartment building, now only a block away.’
      • ‘I exited the elevator quickly, marching out to the crowded street.’
      • ‘She started to walk away, only to march back determinedly less than five seconds later.’
      stalk, strut, stride, flounce, storm, stomp, sweep, swagger
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2with object and adverbial of direction Force (someone) to walk somewhere quickly.
      ‘she gripped Rachel's arm and marched her through the door’
      • ‘He then marched her to a bank and forced her to withdraw 500 from her savings.’
      • ‘Then she flung a arm around his neck, making him bend, and marched him down the stairs.’
      • ‘Both officers grabbed him by the arms in a thumb lock and marched him out of the shop past the customers.’
      • ‘The Nazis who ran the camp tried to hide their crimes by marching their victims away.’
      • ‘Shortly after this a man was marched back into the store and put into a small staff only room, guarded by a security guard and one of the beefier shop boys.’
      • ‘Two further men acting as witnesses approached the offender, seemingly disgusted with his actions, and marched him off down the street.’
      • ‘Wendy grabbed a ringleader's coat and marched him out of the door.’
      • ‘And then he marched Patrick back into the store and we never saw our skateboard stealing friend again.’
      • ‘So he goes after the teenagers, and grabs one in a shop, marching him outside.’
      • ‘Yes, we were marched off to the local cinema to see that.’
      • ‘A parental search party found us shivering and cowering in the scrub and marched us back to civilisation.’
      • ‘He marched me quickly back to our allocated area and took me severely in waltz position.’
      • ‘The employees were marched into the walk-in freezer at gunpoint and locked inside.’
      • ‘He took her firmly by the arm and marched her to off toward the command deck.’
      • ‘His head kept twisting back anxiously as they marched him out of the house, barefoot.’
      • ‘We were marched back onto the train and laughed at - quite demoralising, really.’
      • ‘He doesn't let go of my arm, however, and marches me roughly towards the house.’
      • ‘Anyway, on the time, I was marched in before the court-martial and they were all sitting there at the table, all the officers.’
      • ‘They burst into the farmer's house and when they saw the eldest son, believing him to be the thief, they chained him and marched him to the palace.’
      • ‘When he was asked to hand it back, he told the victim he would only do so in return for money and marched him to a cash point machine where he was forced to withdraw money before handing it back.’
    3. 1.3 Walk along public roads in an organized procession as a form of protest.
      ‘unemployed workers marched from Jarrow to London’
      ‘they planned to march on Baton Rouge’
      • ‘I was aware that the strikers were going to march on Parliament before the end of the week.’
      • ‘The overtures did not divert tens of thousands from marching against the government.’
      • ‘Hundreds of York City fans were expected to march on Bootham Crescent today in a show of solidarity for the threatened football club.’
      • ‘Hundreds of victims of Britain's A-bomb tests are to march on Parliament today in what they say is their best chance ever to secure compensation.’
      • ‘More than 150 public service workers marched on Bolton Town Hall during their one day strike.’
      • ‘Conservative leader William Hague today urged sub-postmasters to march on London for a rally against the threat to their businesses.’
      • ‘Rabbo joined around 1000 demonstrators as they marched along the road that was dug up by Israeli soldiers last week.’
      • ‘Tens of thousands marched in the streets, and masked Hamas militants pledged revenge.’
      • ‘Thousands of protestors attempted to march on the US embassy in Beirut, but were beaten back by police using tear gas and truncheons.’
      • ‘Certainly the tens of thousands marching in Edinburgh are not there just because some pop star told them it was going to be fun.’
      • ‘The Chartists called a rally and 100,000 workers turned up to march on the government.’
      • ‘Despite her support, about 300 protesters tried to march on the US embassy in the capital, Manila.’
      • ‘But at the moment when city government is ready to make a move, they choose to march on the scene tomorrow in their own protest.’
      • ‘On May 29 health care workers are expected to carry out a nine-hour strike and march on the health ministry.’
      • ‘The coca farmers, who had yet to join the protests, indicated that they would march on La Paz and block the roads.’
      • ‘The protestors originally attempted to march on the US Embassy but heavily-armed police blocked their way.’
      • ‘Two hundred immigrants had marched along Devon, protesting the new policy.’
      • ‘Tuesday Scotland's farmers march on Holyrood to protest against the blows which have beset their profession.’
      • ‘Tens of thousands also marched in Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Guatemala and Panama.’
    4. 1.4 (of something abstract) proceed or advance inexorably.
      ‘time marches on’
      • ‘Birnam Wood comes to Dunsinaine in a choral sequence that marches inexorably.’
      • ‘We now march inexorably toward war with Iraq, and to fight that war, we will have to call upon many soldiers.’
      • ‘Together, however, they are inexorably marching toward their fourth league title.’
      • ‘We all sit here, watching and trying to make sense of it all, as Time marches by inexorably…’
      • ‘Huygens' ground track marches inexorably to the east, though the descent is now getting much steeper.’
      • ‘Perhaps music wasn't marching inexorably to dodecaphonic heaven after all.’
      • ‘Spillover would ensure that political elites marched inexorably towards the promotion of integration.’
      • ‘The only reason why the economy continues to march ahead is on account of the positive flow of funding from the rest of the world.’
      move forward, advance, progress, forge ahead, make headway, go on, continue on, roll on, develop, evolve
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1An act or instance of marching.

    ‘the relieving force was more than a day's march away’
    • ‘The trumpet shaped flowers are widely accepted as being a symbol of the Orange Order, and members wear the lily with pride on their sashes during marches.’
    • ‘For instance, as they begin their march, the mood in the army of Shalya, one of the first to start to join the war, is one of celebration.’
    • ‘They aim to reach the Pole in 65 days, by which time they will have covered twice the distance trekked by Hadow in his march to the North Pole.’
    • ‘The afternoon's celebrations included a march down to the ferry launching site, the walking group led by piper Bill Jackson.’
    • ‘It's important to have a plan for that time, but also to break the march into manageable pieces.’
    • ‘It was from here, that 28,000 of the prisoners were taken, towards the end of the War, on what came to be known, as the death marches.’
    • ‘The travel was slow and easy, though the men kept a steady rhythm in their march, their minds dwelling on their families back home.’
    • ‘The twin counterpoint battles of Imphal and Kohima at Burma's gateway to India comprised long marches through dense jungles by both sides.’
    • ‘Route marches, drill and shooting practice helped mould this assortment of keen amateurs filled with patriotic pride into a professional fighting force.’
    hike, trek, tramp, slog, footslog, walk
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A piece of music composed to accompany marching or with a rhythm suggestive of marching.
      ‘he began to hum a funeral march’
      • ‘I'm listening to some of the Nazi marches Arnie used to listen to.’
      • ‘He is a composer of a number of military marches and made arrangements of traditional Turkish songs.’
      • ‘My short program music is a medley of marches by John Philip Sousa.’
      • ‘The band's repertoire includes marches and hymns, music from the shows, orchestral music and popular music.’
      • ‘I'm not sure that eschewing the incipient vulgarity of the two marches by Wagner is entirely a good thing, though!’
      • ‘In the second movement - the funeral march - musical iconography impinges on performance.’
      • ‘The Normandy Band of the Queen's Division provided a full range of music from marches to the stirring Post Horn Gallop.’
      • ‘I may have listened to the slow movement funeral march too many times to really hear it.’
      • ‘My only thought about the march so far is that it's not a march in the direct Mahlerian sense.’
      • ‘There follows a mournful Largo second movement that is, in effect, a funeral march.’
      • ‘Funeral marches abound in Mahler, and they don't always mean literal death.’
      • ‘With their use of tone rows and dense counterpoint these pieces should dispel any ideas that Ives's music is just about jaunty marches and musical borrowings.’
      • ‘It is now a permanent part of classical popular music, in the same way as the waltzes of Strauss or the marches of Sousa.’
      • ‘Instead the music becomes a jaunty march, of the sort that would have been associated with the armies of revolutionary France.’
      • ‘Beethoven's seven-movement Serenade begins and ends with an unpompous march.’
      • ‘The orchestra ended its current tune, and instantly began a mournful march.’
      • ‘Soprano Rosalind Sutherland sings in the New Year with an excellent selection of arias, polkas, marches and waltzes from Strauss.’
      • ‘The rhythm isn't really a waltz or a march, but rather a stumbling sort of gait, indicative of what was to come in the next few years.’
      • ‘It will include waltzes, marches, operetta, Neapolitan songs and Irish classics.’
      • ‘One hears the strong link to the brass band marches of early New Orleans.’
    2. 1.2 A procession organized as a protest.
      ‘a protest march’
      • ‘There would be no threats of boycotts; there would be no marches; there would be no high-toned talk.’
      • ‘The methods they used to advance their case were various: petitions, representations, street marches and fasts.’
      • ‘I wanna stand up for my rights, attend marches, and create bills of rights without being seen as a troublemaker.’
      • ‘Indeed, they used to hold marches against them.’
      • ‘And, unlike other marches, this one will also propose solutions, rather than simply ranting against the war machine.’
      • ‘The curtains flapping from the broken windows led to rumours of white flags and peace marches.’
      • ‘I will still go on the anti-war marches, but I wonder if I will ever return to my local anti-war comrades - I have drifted from them too.’
      • ‘A police officer caught on video repeatedly bashing a protester walking, just walking, in the front line of a march.’
      • ‘At one point, the film follows several of the tour's dancers watching a march by the AIDS activist group ACT UP.’
      • ‘The big anti-war marches encapsulated a cynical mood and a sense of disengagement - and these are hardly ideal sentiments on which to build a mass movement.’
      • ‘He brings a deep commitment to civil rights, nurtured in marches in Mississippi while a college student.’
      • ‘He was also involved in the policing of presidential and Royal visits, marches and sectarian rioting.’
      • ‘Early predictions indicate that the marches look set to become by far the largest demonstration of trade union muscle in decades.’
      • ‘Last weekend, the left held large antiwar marches in Washington, San Francisco and elsewhere.’
      • ‘I hope there will be marches and prayers for peace until the threat of war recedes.’
      • ‘The often violent reactions of the government to civil rights marches is no less an example of right wing violence.’
      • ‘The crackdown on street marches was also very controversial.’
      • ‘Most of the marches in Wellington go to parliament.’
      • ‘They not to have a glimmer of understanding that they live in a democracy and whether we go to war is decided ultimately by parliament not by marches on the street or strongly held opinions.’
      • ‘This one pops up in pamphlet after pamphlet at leftist marches and gatherings; it is taught to many black college students.’
      parade, procession, march past, promenade, cortège
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3in singular The steady and inevitable development or progress of something.
      ‘the march of history’
      • ‘However, instead of a steady march of discovery and triumph, reason has led us to believe there are limits to achievement.’
      • ‘But so inevitable is the march of events that this is all it seems, a tweak.’
      • ‘History is certainly not a rational process nor is it a progressive march towards a harmonious consummation.’
      • ‘It seems as inevitable as the relentless march of time.’
      • ‘Is the will so powerful as to counter the onward march of something inevitable?’
      • ‘Even the relentless march of performance progress has lost its edge, with the increasing bland commercialisation of the enthusiast market.’
      • ‘Many others have written about New Zealand history as though the steady march forward by the State equated with progress.’
      • ‘Much of his affection for the South stemmed from his belief that it was a haven from the onward march of modern industrial progress.’
      • ‘This information was celebrated by the media as the inevitable forward march of progress.’
      • ‘Physics Today will continue to follow the progress of fusion's march toward maturity.’
      • ‘Why is the steady march of science and technology in these areas a problem?’
      • ‘Whatever goes wrong in our lives or the world, the march of progress continues regardless.’
      • ‘That's why the steady march toward a more liberal newsroom is so puzzling.’
      • ‘So the Manifesto pushed a heavily progressive income tax as one of ten key ways to undermine the market order and advance the march toward socialism.’
      • ‘Which is possibly a good reason why it's taken longer for gays to progress in the march towards equality.’
      • ‘To say that we should merely accept it as inevitable, as part of the march of history, as an inescapable part of the zeitgeist, is to accept descent into degradation.’
      • ‘Every few centuries, the steady march of change meets a discontinuity, and history hinges on that moment.’
      • ‘As the march of history progresses, however, traditions change.’
      • ‘The steady march of technological advancement should solve that problem, however.’
      • ‘It understands rile future not as simply a repetition of today or as the inevitable march of progress.’
      progress, advance, progression, passage, continuance, development, evolution, headway
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • march to (the beat of) a different tune (or drummer)

    • informal Consciously adopt a different approach or attitude to the majority of people.

      ‘he has always marched to a different tune but this time his perversity may be his undoing’
      • ‘‘When I walked the picket lines, I really believed that we, as a people, marched to the beat of a different drummer,’ Lyons says.’
      • ‘A professional woman in her 50s said she feels almost ‘invisible’ a lot of the time and that the better jobs or promotions seem to go to those in her company that don't march to a different drummer.’
      • ‘Since his college days, Rice has been seen as someone who marched to the beat of a different drummer.’
      • ‘Lennon is believed to favour a return to Congress and is viewed as a moderate, but the overwhelming message from the conference of over 400 delegates was that the general secretary is marching to a different tune from his troops.’
      • ‘Admiral Rickover, Peter Drucker, and Georges Doriot always marched to a different drummer and got the acclaim of the crowd.’
      • ‘During the go-go days of the late 1990s, when many business thinkers found themselves seduced by the idea that everything is new in the new economy, Jim Collins marched to a different drummer.’
      • ‘‘He marched to a different drummer,’ says his colleague Becker.’
      • ‘Unless you enjoy marching to a different drummer, stick with right betting, avoid wrong betting, and join the tribe.’
      • ‘Now Michael Deaver authors a personal portrait of the former president he says has always marched to a different drummer.’
      • ‘Those who want exegetical help in the interpretation of a specific text will discover that this commentary marches to a different drummer.’
  • on the march

    • 1Marching.

      ‘the army was on the march at last’
      • ‘The pressure of that blank metal stare chilled Martel's soul, as if he were watching distant, marauding armies on the march.’
      • ‘It was like an army on the march when this happened.’
      • ‘It is a stunning, impressive picture that captures the movement of an army on the march, as well as the brooding conditions they face almost as an active element in the conflict.’
      • ‘Armies were on the march, battles were being fought and lost, and regimes became acutely conscious of their vulnerability.’
      • ‘They reached the bottom of the hill, and two-thirds of the country was empty, as the orcs had gone on the march to meet Aragorn's army.’
      • ‘Their job was to ensure no Moslem army should advance suddenly and catch Charles on the march.’
      • ‘The battle began accidentally when the two armies encountered each other on the march at the pass of Cynoscephalae.’
      • ‘The Kingdom of Jerusalem still hung by a thread and armies were on the march that spring.’
      • ‘Another way Sweden found to reduce her war costs was to train her army to live off of the land thereby reducing the supply issue for an army on the march.’
      • ‘Even most of the meat he had eaten on the march with Cadona's army was cooked or dry.’
      1. 1.1Making progress.
        ‘United are on the march again’
        • ‘Partick Thistle are joint top of the Second Division just behind Clydebank on goal difference and John Lambie is convincing friend and foe alike that the Firhill side are on the march once more.’
        • ‘But the gospel according to Mel betrays a peculiarly unsophisticated take on the key event in the Christian tradition, and casts doubt on the idea that religion is on the march.’
        • ‘The government there has a vested interest in being seen to be hardline: the right-wing is on the march and on the rise in Belgium, causing considerable unease in Brussels.’
        • ‘Freedom has always been on the march in this country.’
        • ‘Let us be in no doubt that the US military industrial complex is off the leash and on the march, bankrolling both Republicans and Democrats.’
        • ‘Because of the sacrifices of our men and women in uniform, two terror regimes are gone forever, freedom is on the march, and America is more secure.’
        • ‘This time last year, when Celtic were engaged in a heroic, though ultimately futile, Champions League campaign, O'Neill's reputation was on the march.’
        • ‘That superb strike was as good a note as any to sign off on, leaving everyone who saw the performance half-thinking of a quick dash to the bookies before word got out that Towers are on the march.’
        • ‘Military style has been on the march for a while now, but this season, army attire will push its way to the fashion front.’
        • ‘Communism was on the march in Afghanistan, Nicaragua and Angola.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from French marcher ‘to walk’ (earlier ‘to trample’), of uncertain origin.

Pronunciation

march

/mɑːtʃ/

Main definitions of march in English

: march1march2March3

march2

plural noun

Marches
  • 1An area of land on the border between two countries or territories, especially between England and Wales or (formerly) England and Scotland.

    ‘the Welsh Marches’
    • ‘The plague in Wales and the Marches were as pitiless as elsewhere.’
    • ‘Wroxeter's main street was formed by the road running north-south along the Welsh Marches, linking the fortresses of Caerleon and Chester.’
    • ‘He was sent with his mother to Ludlow in 1473 to be titular ruler of Wales and the Welsh Marches, staying there for much of the rest of his father's reign.’
    • ‘This border region, the Marches, is a stretch of pasture-land much broken by hills, woods, and twisting rivers.’
    • ‘West of the Severn valley and the north midland plain is the Welsh Marches, classic hill and vale country with small areas of upland separated by deeply incised valleys.’
    • ‘The strength of Chester's connections with Liverpool and with Wales and the Marches contrasts with the relative weakness of those to the east and south-east.’
    • ‘Educated at Shrewsbury (his father being lord president of the Council in the Marches of Wales) and at Christ Church, Oxford, he was devoted to study.’
    • ‘With landed influence now increasingly concentrated in crown hands, the council of Arthur, prince of Wales, at Ludlow, was given greater powers to enforce law and order in the Welsh Marches and English border shires.’
    • ‘Upon the death of Walter de Lacy in 1241 his two granddaughters became heiresses to his lands and lordships in England, the Welsh Marches, and Ireland.’
    • ‘Set on the Welsh Marches beneath Lancashire, its name comes from the Latin for Place of the Legions.’
    • ‘The border Marches were renamed the Middle Shires and the border laws replaced with ‘Jeddart Justice’, where summary executions were common.’
    • ‘The Despensers were engaged in empire-building in the Welsh Marches, Roger's own part of the world.’
    • ‘Similarly, Philip Stott, emeritus professor of biogeography at the University of London, points out that in AD1200 Britain was so warm that the Normans made wine in the Welsh Marches.’
    borders, boundaries, borderlands, frontiers, limits, confines
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1the Marches
      dated name for Marche

verb

[no object]march with
  • (of a country, territory, or estate) have a common frontier with.

    ‘his estate marches with yours’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French marche (noun), marchir (verb), of Germanic origin; related to mark.

Pronunciation

march

/mɑːtʃ/

Main definitions of march in English

: march1march2March3

March3

noun

  • The third month of the year, in the northern hemisphere usually considered the first month of spring.

    ‘the work was completed in March’
    as modifier ‘the March issue of the magazine’
    • ‘There was a period between October and March when at times we were seven to eight short.’
    • ‘Work on the premises is set to begin next month with a view to a grand opening in March or April next year.’
    • ‘They flower from March to June and disperse mature seeds from May to July in the second year.’
    • ‘I downloaded my email and found the stats for accesses to this site for the month of March.’
    • ‘Work on the site is due to begin at the end of the month and is expected to be completed at the end of March next year.’
    • ‘Both said that they expected talks would be finished and a deal would be on the table by March or April.’
    • ‘Waiting times are to be cut to six months by March and just three months the following year.’
    • ‘In March, Blair asked him to talk the unions out of a damaging strike ahead of the election.’
    • ‘The best time to prune a fig bush is late February or early March, while it is still dormant.’
    • ‘In March he was sentenced on both counts to concurrent terms of life imprisonment.’
    • ‘Whale sharks pass by in late March and early April and the occasional dugong has been seen.’
    • ‘February and March are the time of year that the area's hare population is most visible.’
    • ‘She says he invited her to his hotel room and that the pair met again the following March in Leeds.’
    • ‘In March we launched our new conference guide and the response so far has been excellent.’
    • ‘He is going to be on holiday for a week but will be in a position to file the Report by the 28th March.’
    • ‘By March last year almost every city and many small towns had set up local coalitions.’
    • ‘I gave quite a detailed explanation of pension credit in my column in the March issue.’
    • ‘Whale shark season is in March and April, though you could get lucky at any time of year.’
    • ‘We do know, however, that it will be in February or March next year at the earliest.’
    • ‘In March it gave a final warning that if things did not improve it would consider legal action.’

Origin

Middle English: from an Old French dialect variant of marz, from Latin Martius (mensis) ‘(month) of Mars’.

Pronunciation

March

/mɑːtʃ/