Definition of mansion tax in English:

mansion tax

noun

informal
  • A tax levied on expensive residential properties of a value in excess of a particular sum:

    ‘the mayoral candidates were asked about their views on a possible mansion tax for rich homeowners’
    • ‘But one thing that wasn't in the Budget was a full-blown mansion tax of the sort he has been calling for.’
    • ‘His insistence that a mansion tax was still on the cards will surprise many of his party's MPs and supporters, who have grown pessimistic about it becoming government policy.’
    • ‘I've been raging all morning about the proposed mansion tax.’
    • ‘Cable, who once proposed a mansion tax, called for "fair taxes" and redistribution of wealth recently.’
    • ‘A land tax, a mansion tax and a leafy suburb tax on those living in more affluent areas have all been mooted.’
    • ‘Not sure I'd want to pay a mansion tax on it.’
    • ‘There's a huge amount of confusion surrounding the proposals for a 'mansion tax' and, more generally, taxation at the top end of the housing market.’
    • ‘The upcoming UK budget (21 March) may see the controversial 50 per cent tax on top earners being replaced with a mansion tax on real estate worth more than £2 million (around $3.2 million).’
    • ‘What happens if local councils wanted to impose, say, a mansion tax on the most expensive properties in their area?’
    • ‘On picking up the paper yesterday morning you quite probably encountered some discussions about the proposed 'mansion tax'.’
    • ‘They believe that scrapping or reducing the rate could increase tax revenue, meaning there would be no need for the money a "mansion tax" would raise.’
    • ‘He cited the party's backing for a "mansion tax" on properties worth more than £2 million ($3.8 million) - a move he said could raise £2 billion a year.’
    • ‘Opponents of a mansion tax complain that it would penalise the equity-rich but income-poor and force some pensioners to sell their family homes.’
    • ‘The launch of the mansion tax was a fiasco, and it may prove electorally disastrous in wealthy seats, but in theory it has merit.’
    • ‘So let's not pretend the mansion tax is a viable proposition: it's not.’
    • ‘The most obvious point is that a Mansion Tax is a tax that would not take any account of an individual’s ability to pay.’
    • ‘On the mansion tax: He says the "wealthy must pay their share".’
    • ‘Mansion tax is not Land Value Tax, but it is a place to start down the road to shifting a significant part of the tax base from income to wealth.’
    • ‘One of the aims of a Mansion Tax is to collect a share of the untaxed wealth the rich currently enjoy.’