Definition of mandola in English:

mandola

noun

  • 1A large tenor or bass mandolin, used in ensembles and folk groups.

    • ‘He is a fine self-accompanist on bouzouki and mandola.’
    • ‘Modern makers then started producing them with flat backs which made them almost identical to the octave mandola.’
    • ‘I have made the decision to do the custom order through you because of your upgrade policy, setup, and obvious love of mandolas.’
    • ‘In the ten days of the course, I learned the basics of luthiery and built my own mandola.’
    • ‘The first time I had ever saw a mandola was on the back cover of a Planxty album.’
    1. 1.1historical An early stringed instrument of the mandolin or cittern type.
      • ‘Both the late medieval gittern and the early guitar were sometimes called mandoras.’
      • ‘Laden with mandoras, we arrive at the isolated farm where the charming Loula makes traditional halloumi cheese from the milk of goats tended by her husband.’
      • ‘There are also plenty of mandoras in other woods and quite a lot of striped mandoras using ribs of two different woods.’
      • ‘Wire strings not only were used on guitars, mandoras, and bass lutes, but gave rise to a whole new family of string instruments, which included zithers, citterns, the Irish harp, psaltery, clavichord and others during the 15th and 16th centuries.’
      • ‘Jodi is currently touring the east coast, showcasing her hefty arsenal of songs, stories and instruments, including mandola, acoustic guitar, resonator guitar and percussion.’

Origin

Early 18th century: from Italian.

Pronunciation

mandola

/manˈdəʊlə/