Definition of malaria in English:

malaria

noun

mass noun
  • An intermittent and remittent fever caused by a protozoan parasite which invades the red blood cells and is transmitted by mosquitoes in many tropical and subtropical regions.

    The parasite belongs to the genus Plasmodium (phylum Sporozoa) and is transmitted by female mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles

    • ‘The threats of malaria and diarrhoeal diseases will only further increase with the onset of rains.’
    • ‘Benign tertian malaria may not be seen until several years after arrival.’
    • ‘Fixed dose drugs have proved successful in treating malaria and tuberculosis.’
    • ‘In tropical and sub-tropical areas, malaria is one of the world's biggest killers.’
    • ‘Most people get malaria by being bitten by an infected female Anopheles mosquito.’
    • ‘The majority of the people she sees are suffering from malaria, tuberculosis and skin diseases.’
    • ‘More heat will also mean the spread of water-borne diseases such as malaria.’
    • ‘These mutations and their impact on the epidemiology of malaria are described below.’
    • ‘The result of this was a significant increase in cases of malaria and dengue fever.’
    • ‘It has been known for some time that some mosquitoes transmit malaria, while others do not.’
    • ‘Preventable diseases such as malaria and diarrhea and cholera are a major killer.’
    • ‘Tony Campolo said that response is like trying to get rid of malaria by killing mosquitoes.’
    • ‘Fever or malaria remained the second most important cause of death throughout the recall period.’
    • ‘Others die as the result of completely avoidable diseases such as malaria and diarrhoea.’
    • ‘Japanese researchers may have discovered how to block an essential step in the transmission of malaria.’
    • ‘We found limited evidence linking number of mosquito bites and risk of malaria.’
    • ‘Small changes in the distribution of malaria may therefore expose large numbers of people to infection.’
    • ‘With thousands of bodies lying on streets there was a risk of malaria and dengue fever.’
    • ‘Adults with malaria who grew up in parts of Africa where malaria is endemic are common in our intensive care unit.’
    • ‘Tuberculosis and malaria are the two major causes of illness and death in the nation.’

Origin

Mid 18th century: from Italian, from mal'aria, contracted form of mala aria ‘bad air’. The term originally denoted the unwholesome atmosphere caused by the exhalations of marshes, to which the disease was formerly attributed.

Pronunciation

malaria

/məˈlɛːrɪə/