Definition of mahonia in English:

mahonia

noun

  • An evergreen shrub of the barberry family, which produces clusters of small fragrant yellow flowers followed by purple or black berries, native to eastern Asia and North and Central America.

    • ‘For shrubs and trees, try ash, barberry, box elder, bush cinquefoil, butterfly bush, cotoneaster, currants and gooseberries, euonymous, forsythia, lilac (though my deer love them), mahonia, and viburnum.’
    • ‘Currently full of snowdrops and mahonia, the garden is popular with patients and visitors alike.’
    • ‘To help stabilize slopes, try mahonia, manzanita, Ribes, or sumac.’
    • ‘This mahonia can look fantastic in a large container when grouped with other winter plants.’
    • ‘At this time of year it's difficult to make the garden look anything but dull, even with the occasional splash of winter colour from a witch hazel or mahonia.’
    • ‘Over three months, the gardeners pulled out the weeds by hand, dug and prepared the ground, and replanted with flowering evergreen shrubs such as hebes and mahonia, for year-round colour and low maintenance.’
    • ‘Generally, pruning should be done on shrubs which flower before mid-summer as soon as flowering is over, including winter-flowering viburnums and mahonias, Ribes sanguineum, weigela and Spiraea ‘Arguta’.’
    • ‘But the end of the year belongs to the mahonias, with their bright yellow flowers and bold, evergreen foliage.’
    • ‘Many birds love berries of barberry, beautyberry, cotoneaster, currant, elderberry, gooseberry, holly, mahonia, mountain ash, nandina, pyracantha, and strawberry tree (not all plants grow in every zone).’
    • ‘With its bright yellow wood, the evergreen mahonia is very attractive just now, with its holly-like foliage, scented yellow flowers and black berries.’

Origin

Modern Latin, named after Bernard McMahon ( c. 1775–1816), American botanist.

Pronunciation:

mahonia

/məˈhəʊnɪə/