Definition of magister in English:

magister

noun

archaic
  • A title or form of address given to scholars, especially those teaching in a medieval university.

    • ‘Boethius became magister officiorum under Theodoric in about 520.’
    • ‘Around 1145, Peter became a "magister", or professor, at the cathedral school of Notre Dame in Paris.’
    • ‘Their claim to consideration rested on their expertise, their mastery, and the title magister became the sufficient indication of their authority.’
    • ‘Tilney was principally a lawyer, although variously described as magister, clerk, bachelor-of-law, esquire, gentleman, and husbandman.’
    • ‘The great majority of, if not all, important figures in medieval music bear the title magister.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin, ‘master’.

Pronunciation

magister

/məˈdʒɪstə//ˈmadʒɪstə/