Main definitions of mace in English

: Mace1mace2mace3

Mace1

noun

trademark
  • [mass noun] An irritant chemical used in an aerosol to disable attackers.

    • ‘[But] why put deadbolt locks on your doors and stock up on cans of Mace and then decide to leave your windows open?’
    • ‘To reassure herself, she touched the handful of explosive caplets of Mace in one coat pocket and checked that she had all five mini-DVDs in her other pocket next to her recorder.’
    • ‘But it would be just my luck if the girl of my dreams took a dislike to me, had a big can of Mace and an itchy trigger finger.’
    • ‘Squall remembered that she had used Mace on Scalpel.’
    • ‘You can't pull your gun, no Mace - why don't we just arm-wrestle to see if you go to jail?’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Spray (someone) with Mace.

    ‘three individuals were Maced by an unknown male’
    • ‘But as officers put him in a cruiser, an audio recording inside the car shows Coleman asking why they maced him.’
    • ‘According to MPD spokesman Ron Reier, officers Maced and handcuffed Doby in an attempt to subdue him.’
    • ‘At the police station, Winkler told Siewert that he maced Nelson after Nelson maced him.’
    • ‘"OK, well, somebody maced him," I said.’

Origin

1960s (originally US): probably from mace.

Pronunciation:

Mace

/meɪs/

Main definitions of mace in English

: Mace1mace2mace3

mace2

noun

  • 1A staff of office, especially that which lies on the table in the House of Commons when the Speaker is in the chair, regarded as a symbol of the authority of the House.

    • ‘This ritual includes medieval regalia augmented with presidential seals, medallions and a mace as well as a section in the inauguration programme that describes the duties of the office.’
    • ‘In the melee, the mace that symbolizes the authority of the legislature was carried away and was later found in a lobby used by parliamentarians.’
    • ‘They depict the pharaoh, or rather the pharaoh's ka, in a striding pose and holding a mace in one hand and a long staff in the other.’
    • ‘The high jinks consist of handcuffing themselves to the mace in the House of Assembly, or blocking the Prime Minister's path and getting arrested and quietly let go.’
    • ‘John proudly showed me a photograph of himself in his smart uniform, holding the golden mace and stood alongside the current mayor in full regalia.’
    • ‘The mace symbolises the authority of the speaker of the national assembly and its presence in the chamber indicates an official sitting of parliament.’
    • ‘He carries the mace in the Speaker's Procession each day and also into the House of Lords during the State Opening of Parliament.’
    • ‘The existing maces have far more in common with the same item that Kings of the period are shown holding when crowned or seated in state.’
    • ‘He wears a gilded crown and carries a gilded mace.’
    • ‘Similar swords became used by the 9th century for ceremonial purposes too, such as coronations: the sword had become, with the mace, a symbol of majesty.’
    • ‘At the third offence he shall lose the mace and be permanently removed from office.’
    • ‘But perhaps the biggest change will be that the new mace will no longer lie on a table with its head directed at the ruling party.’
  • 2historical A heavy club with a spiked metal head.

    • ‘They also carried broad swords and maces to use when an enemy got in too close.’
    • ‘There were at least eight guards there, holding weapons from maces to swords to lances.’
    • ‘Bullets were scarce, however, so the guns quickly gave way to pikes, swords, kendo sticks, maces, and dirks.’
    • ‘These weapons, such as clubs, maces, axes, and hammers, are as old as warfare and are certainly the oldest form of weapon wielded by man and his ancestors.’
    • ‘He and his troops were well-equipped with glaives, maces, battle axes, and long bows.’
    staff, club, cudgel, stick, shillelagh, bludgeon, blackjack, truncheon, cosh, life preserver
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French masse large hammer.

Pronunciation:

mace

/meɪs/

Main definitions of mace in English

: Mace1mace2mace3

mace3

noun

  • [mass noun] The reddish fleshy outer covering of the nutmeg, dried as a spice.

    • ‘In a wide shallow pan, melt the butter and then add the mace and cayenne pepper.’
    • ‘Spices such as coriander, cumin, turmeric, cinnamon, mace and nutmeg are ideal for winter soups and paprika helps provide a rich colour, says Bridget Jones.’
    • ‘When cooked, remove the skin and place the fish in a pie dish in layers with the sliced eggs, knobs of butter, pepper and mace.’
    • ‘Before La Varenne, court cuisine had over-emphasized the use of sugar and such sweet spices as cloves, mace, cardamom or nutmeg.’
    • ‘Mince it, not too finely with fat pork and bacon bits, season it with juniper, thyme and mace then bake the pate slowly, covered with foil, in a roasting tin half filled with water.’
    • ‘Chillies, turmeric, ginger, mace, saffron, nutmeg, poppy seeds, garlic, cloves, bay leaves, and curry leaves are among the most commonly used spices.’
    • ‘Mix together an ounce of each of the following ingredients: mace, nutmeg, cloves, caraway seeds and cinnamon.’
    • ‘They too were trying to get to the East Indies, where nutmeg, mace, pepper and cloves could be bought.’
    • ‘Among the spices specified are ginger, nutmeg, mace, cloves, and saffron; caraway seeds seem always to have been included.’
    • ‘Cloves, mace and nutmeg are all used as flavouring agents in cooking.’
    • ‘Place the pumpkin, ice cream, milk and cinnamon, nutmeg and mace into a blender.’
    • ‘To prepare, pour 250 ml white wine vinegar into a pan, add ½ small shallot, sliced, a blade of mace and ¼ teaspoon black peppercorns.’
    • ‘The principal exports are nutmeg, bananas, cocoa, and mace.’
    • ‘They wanted to trade: the market at home was eager (at one time or another) for spices - pepper, nutmeg, mace and cloves.’
    • ‘It was also the only time of year, we would use some of the really wacky spices in our spice drawer, like mace, and allspice and poultry seasoning.’
    • ‘A spice that increases the body's temperature, like cinnamon, nutmeg, and mace, is a warm spice.’
    • ‘This was for fried fish spiced with all-spice, cloves, turmeric, black pepper, garlic and the other spice that comes with nutmeg, mace.’
    • ‘Other spices are produced for local consumption and export, including mace, cinnamon, and cloves.’
    • ‘The finer spices consist of cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg and mace, which shared the fact that the places where they were grown were rather select, hence, the limited supply.’
    • ‘I was supposed to sprinkle the top with clove and mace but I was out of mace so I used nutmeg instead.’

Origin

Middle English macis (taken as plural), via Old French from Latin macir.

Pronunciation:

mace

/meɪs/