Definition of lycanthropy in English:

lycanthropy

noun

mass noun
  • 1The mythical transformation of a person into a wolf.

    • ‘Yeah, this pretty much flies in the face of the original, wherein the slightest tap from a syringe full of the stuff seemed to instantly remedy lycanthropy, but… whatever.’
    • ‘Do they have a test for lycanthropy these days…?’
    • ‘On the one hand, lycanthropy referred to the reality of the werewolf, that is, the phenomenon of metamorphosis from human form to wolf.’
    • ‘I was just trying to remember as much as I could about lycanthropy.’
    • ‘Vampirism, lycanthropy and even cannibalism can also be transmitted by bite, not to mention Contagious Lupine Homosexuality.’
    • ‘You see, Mr. Jennings, the strength and power contained in that cell may hold the key to immortality, if I read my legends of lycanthropy correctly.’
    • ‘Well, a werewolf bit them and yeah, lycanthropy is passed on through bites.’
    • ‘That his lycanthropy is never resolved (it is neither cured nor its origin explained) seems not to bother the baron, the king, his men, or Marie herself.’
    • ‘The equating of lycanthropy and homosexuality's pretty direct here and it's hard to figure out why.’
    • ‘For some reason, with the curse of lycanthropy comes the curse of country music.’
    • ‘What follows is a wincingly uninspired plot about siblings dealing with lycanthropy and trying to discover who infected them.’
    • ‘As a victim of lycanthropy, The Wolf had always been hungry for friends.’
    • ‘This is because I have contracted lycanthropy.’
    • ‘For his trouble, he's cursed with a peculiar form of lycanthropy that appears to transform its sufferers into German shepherds.’
    • ‘A teenage werewolf tale that cleverly equates lycanthropy with menstruation, Snaps is a horror movie that apparently has something to say.’
    • ‘Ruby interrupted, ‘Lycanthropy this, lycanthropy that… don't you ever have a real excuse?’’
    • ‘The full moon had long represented supernatural occurrences, lycanthropy and such.’
    • ‘When Ginger turns from horny to hyper violent, Brigitte's last hope is Sam, a handsome dope dealer with expertise in biology and lycanthropy.’
    • ‘Stef wouldn't usually talk about his lycanthropy, or sex - the first out of fear that people were listening, and the latter because he worried about making people uncomfortable.’
    1. 1.1archaic A form of madness involving the delusion of being an animal, usually a wolf, with correspondingly altered behaviour.
      • ‘There are a few cases of lycanthropy, such as drug addicts being locked up after claiming to be seeing satanic visions, growing hair and even chasing rabbits in their spare time.’
      • ‘In modern psychology, lycanthropy is an infrequent disorder in which a person believes they're a wolf or some other animal, often linked to schizophrenia.’
      • ‘Similar attempts to explain lycanthropy as a delusion rooted in illness have been repeated throughout the twentieth century.’
      • ‘Whether DMX is a lycanthropy sufferer or simply identifies with the plight of the four-legged, it remains to be seen.’
      • ‘Modern academics see lycanthropy as a fantasy which reveals fundamental aspects of modern personality.’
      insanity, insaneness, dementia, mental illness, derangement, dementedness, instability, unsoundness of mind, lunacy, distraction, depression, mania, hysteria, frenzy, psychosis, psychopathy, schizophrenia, hydrophobia
      View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century (as a supposed form of madness): from modern Latin lycanthropia, from Greek lukanthrōpia, from lukos ‘wolf’ + anthrōpos ‘man’.

Pronunciation

lycanthropy

/lʌɪˈkanθrəpi/