Definition of luxury in English:

luxury

noun

  • 1[mass noun] A state of great comfort or elegance, especially when involving great expense:

    ‘he lived a life of luxury’
    • ‘He knew passengers desired luxury and comfort when travelling even short distances.’
    • ‘By 2000, Pringle had reinvented the twinset again as a sleek, modern garment, a symbol of comfort and luxury.’
    • ‘This not only has the benefit of looking elegant but frees up space so that designers are able to offer more comfort and luxury to even the smallest of cars.’
    • ‘While luxury gives us comfort, we should realize that this is not sustainable.’
    • ‘After all, Yitro enjoyed a high position in Midyan and was living in comfort and luxury.’
    • ‘There were large exotic trees and open spaces around the few houses, each competing with the other, in design, elegance and luxury.’
    • ‘Even when the setting is warm and inviting the appeal of stripping away comfort and luxury seems dubious.’
    • ‘But when it comes to real luxury and real comfort the newer air mattresses of today have no peers.’
    • ‘Whilst a million British Catholics are turned down for the job, this man slipped from country to country and now lives in luxury at their expense.’
    • ‘A brief survey of the royal apartment leaves nothing to the imagination for royal comfort and luxury.’
    • ‘You have stepped into sheer luxury with spacious and comfortable accommodations.’
    • ‘Discover a world of comfort and luxury, traveling in the company of women with Olivia.’
    • ‘Why would you abandon this comfort and luxury to perform on the Fringe?’
    • ‘For a start it seats 14 more than the previous plane, and offers a better level of comfort and luxury.’
    • ‘It enabled her to keep her family in comfort and enough luxury to feel a part of the American dream.’
    • ‘The atmosphere throughout is one of understated elegance and the highest standards of comfort and luxury.’
    • ‘There is a lot of emphasis on comfort and luxury with the new car.’
    • ‘I know that I won't have all the comforts and luxury in Israel but I don't care for that.’
    • ‘This seems a small price for a swindler to pay for enjoying a life of luxury at the expense of the small business community.’
    • ‘I opened the door and went in, still struck by the sheer comfort and luxury of the room.’
    opulence, luxuriousness, sumptuousness, richness, costliness, grandeur, grandness, splendour, magnificence, lavishness, lap of luxury, bed of roses, milk and honey
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    1. 1.1[count noun] An inessential, desirable item which is expensive or difficult to obtain:
      ‘luxuries like chocolate, scent, and fizzy wine’
      • ‘In the Sahara, cars, electric showers, water and even toilets are absolute luxuries!’
      • ‘My greatest luxuries were miniature pots of Marmite and packet soups from the canteen.’
      • ‘Tens of thousands of pensioners are prisoners in their homes, with none of the luxuries Huntley and Bieber receive.’
      • ‘Local taxes and surcharges on luxuries like theatre tickets were also reintroduced as a means of subsidizing hospitals.’
      • ‘At the end of a busy day, they go home to such luxuries as double jacuzzi baths.’
      • ‘Victoria felt even more guilty as she eyed up the luxuries dotted around the room.’
      • ‘Lottery money has to be sought, not for luxuries or extravagances, but to maintain parks and public areas.’
      • ‘It wasn't that long ago that cigarette lighters or radios were automotive luxuries.’
      • ‘She put televisions and kettles in every cell, not as luxuries but because she considered them to be basics of life.’
      • ‘With indulgence in luxuries out of the question, he recommended reading, gardening and amateur theatricals.’
      • ‘It's easy to forget that luxuries such as fitted carpets and central heating are comparatively recent.’
      • ‘A washing machine and a refrigerator were luxuries which made the life of the housewife much easier.’
      • ‘In fact, the only thing he did act upon was his increasingly voracious appetite for sex, food and expensive luxuries.’
      • ‘Some of their own professors in the past might have seen such virtues as expensive luxuries.’
      • ‘Unattainable luxuries were transformed into desirable marks of status or even into affordable necessities.’
      • ‘Some special editions featured such luxuries as mats and a CD player.’
      • ‘It was a sitting room, with huge windows and thick carpet and couches and the usual luxuries.’
      • ‘Branch networks are moribund expensive luxuries, yet customers like branches.’
      • ‘It is a far cry from the touring luxuries of the bands they have supported.’
      • ‘As the gifts and luxuries stack up, is everything as it appears or do dangerous times lie in wait for her?’
      indulgence, extravagance, self-indulgence, treat, extra, non-essential, frill
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    2. 1.2[in singular] A pleasure obtained only rarely:
      ‘they actually had the luxury of a whole day together’
      • ‘While the first film had a certain low-budget charm, with its tight cast and steep action curve, it had the luxury of being the first of its kind.’
      • ‘Since his films were made for next to nothing, he couldn't afford the luxury of paying for film extras.’
      • ‘Her mother was chopping meat, which they rarely had the luxury of having, and putting it into a wooden bowl.’
      • ‘Malton and Norton have the luxury of selecting from a full complement of players for their home clash against Bradford Salem.’
      • ‘In the global era, we cannot afford the luxury of seeing our two great cities knocking spots off each other rather than joining resources.’
      • ‘In siege mentality I sought haven in the luxury of a massage.’
      • ‘Whereas Woods had the luxury of laying up at the 13 th and 15th holes, his pursuers did not have that option.’
      • ‘I go downstairs to fix myself breakfast, and then decide to treat myself to the luxury of eating it in my room.’
      • ‘He can afford himself the luxury of indulging fantasies about the future.’
      • ‘Rarely do you have the luxury of going into a movie that you know a lot of people want to see.’
      • ‘The freelancers, however, often don't have the luxury of saying no.’
      • ‘You haven't got the luxury of getting emotionally involved.’
      • ‘I'm writing essays and indulging in the luxury of reading books not written by me.’
      • ‘He did not have the luxury of slow-motion replays to examine at his leisure, but was faced with having to make an instant decision.’
      • ‘I did however treat myself to the luxury of some powdered milk and it has revolutionised my evening cup of tea.’
      • ‘When push came to shove, Hawk Wing, not allowed the luxury of having strong pace-setters, was left with too much to do.’
      • ‘I've allowed myself the luxury of a day of pure undiluted self-indulgence today.’
      • ‘Globalisation is a force that does not allow the luxury of saying, ‘Stop, I want to get off’.’
      • ‘With a 15-year-old to look after and a demanding job, I can't afford the luxury of slowing down.’
      • ‘Perhaps it's also because I have the luxury of ordering my own days, rather than swimming in the daily tides of commuting.’
      joy, delight, bliss, blessing, benefit, advantage, boon
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adjective

  • [attributive] Luxurious or of the nature of a luxury:

    ‘a luxury yacht’
    ‘luxury goods’
    • ‘Boarding the luxury yacht was strange - walk along a gangway, but then pull yourself up on a rope that enabled you to clamber aboard.’
    • ‘Health and fitness is big and the luxury hotels cater to this trend.’
    • ‘The new project follows two plans which were scrapped - one for a £7m hotel and one for luxury apartments.’
    • ‘Get rid of those London-based middle managers who splash the licence fee on ludicrous motivational courses at luxury hotels.’
    • ‘On the whole, Americans don't do luxury ski hotels as well as the Europeans.’
    • ‘I do not believe that the real life of this nation is to be found in the great luxury hotels or so-called fashionable suburbs.’
    • ‘This hotel is P&O's luxury cruise liner Aurora, the largest passenger ship currently flying the Red Ensign.’
    • ‘Because of the luxury hotels and high prices, the region is expecting that most visits will be from foreign tourists.’
    • ‘The Sheraton Perdana is the nearest luxury hotel to the yacht club.’
    • ‘He has opened a luxury spa hotel in Seaham to cater to the local rich.’
    • ‘Explore nature up close and in style aboard luxury yachts, small ships and wilderness lodges.’
    • ‘His world is one of luxury yachts, private jets, pet tigers and plastic surgeons.’
    • ‘Anyone interested in a presidential yacht, luxury cars, presidential houses and rest houses by the beach?’
    • ‘The Tourism authorities should also stop the promotion of luxury hotels, the travel writer feels.’
    • ‘Its 25 km long peninsula is lined with luxury hotels and we stayed in one of the newest five-star resorts.’
    • ‘The Japanese are alleged to have held a three-day orgy at the luxury hotel under the guise of a company celebration.’
    • ‘Based in West Cork since 1973, his expertise lies in luxury yacht design.’
    • ‘The imposition of luxury tax on five-star hotels by State Governments also does not help the tourist.’
    • ‘Although some hotels and luxury food stores compete to serve the first grouse of the season, many of the birds go to overseas markets.’
    • ‘Indeed most of the large new hotels are being built to US fire and safety codes so that they can eventually be sold to worldwide luxury hotel chains.’
    smart, stylish, upmarket, fancy, high-class, fashionable, chic, luxurious, luxury, deluxe, exclusive, select, sumptuous, opulent, lavish, grand, rich, elegant, ornate, ostentatious, showy
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Origin

Middle English (denoting lechery): from Old French luxurie, luxure, from Latin luxuria, from luxus excess. The earliest current sense dates from the mid 17th century.

Pronunciation:

luxury

/ˈlʌkʃ(ə)ri/