Definition of lutenist in English:

lutenist

(also lutanist)

noun

  • A lute player.

    • ‘A guitar virtuoso, heir to the lutenists of old, friend of Beethoven and Rossini, Giuliani composed concerti, chamber music, and songs, as well as guitar solos and duets.’
    • ‘It may well be that as far as lutenists were concerned, Bach could have saved himself a good deal of ink.’
    • ‘Béthune himself, his brother and his son are listed among the lutenists who played on this occasion.’
    • ‘He was joined by elegant Italian lutenist Andrea Damiani in contrapuntal pieces by Vincenzo Galilei.’
    • ‘In ancient Egyptian depictions of lute-playing, the lutenists are mostly young women.’
    • ‘Our lutenist blew onto his fingers, our drummer fretted over his chilly skins, our soprano shrank into her mufflers.’
    • ‘They are the only famed lutanists in the world.’
    • ‘Considering that lutes regularly start at $1800, these are a great way for the beginner lutenist on a tight budget to get started.’
    • ‘In the late 1950s Pears popularized early English songs by John Dowland and others, accompanied by famous guitarist and lutenist Julian Bream.’
    • ‘Arriving at the cauldron in 1829 is English lutenist Peter Claire, ready to join the royal orchestra.’
    • ‘The painting is probably best known to lutenists now as the illustration used on the paperback edition of the Dowland lute music.’
    • ‘The lutenist put down his instrument and rummaged through a side pocket of the case, and held up a pair of university concert tickets.’
    • ‘Thomas Berghan is a lutenist specializing in music of the French Baroque.’
    • ‘John Johnson, Queen Elizabeth's favourite lutenist, died in 1594, when the Golden Age school of lutenists was at its zenith.’
    • ‘Douglas is one of the few lutanists to accompany himself as a singer.’
    • ‘In addition to the previously mentioned lutenists, we must add the name of Eduardo Eguez.’
    • ‘Lamentably, the contribution to the Baroque made by the 17th century lutenist composers of the French School has not been fully realized, quantified or understood.’
    • ‘Young Alfonso was accepted at court in his turn, a singer, lutenist and violist.’
    • ‘They were technically inept in the skills of composition, though some were fine singers and lutenists.’
    • ‘One of the most famous composers and lutenists of his day, Dowland also represented the Elizabethan artistic temperament.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from medieval Latin lutanista, from lutana lute.

Pronunciation:

lutenist

/ˈluːt(ə)nɪst/