Main definitions of lure in English

: lure1lure2

lure1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Tempt (a person or animal) to do something or to go somewhere, especially by offering some form of reward.

    ‘the child was lured into a car but managed to escape’
    • ‘They leaped and twirled, and they seemed to be luring her to swim with them.’
    • ‘Mavis swam just below the surface, luring me to take a snapshot, beautiful in her deep, blue pool.’
    • ‘Until now the emphasis was more on luring foreign tourists to the country and the domestic travellers have been missed out.’
    • ‘For want of amusement I decided to have a look-see at what sort of searches were luring you poor blighted souls my way.’
    • ‘Mrs Skipper says Brandenburg abused her son during a trip to Tasmania, while also luring him to Adelaide.’
    • ‘Scent in the garden is indispensable, luring you outside to enjoy the hot balmy days of summer and adding mood and atmosphere to a space.’
    • ‘Today, though, the denser cities are luring people back with the promise of less traffic.’
    • ‘They are luring their intended victims into a false sense of security.’
    • ‘Donaldson is accused of luring his wife into the disused house on the caravan site at Crianlarich, where he had stored a box of large fireworks.’
    • ‘In my opinion, luring a kid via the Internet leaves no doubt that the pervert is guilty.’
    • ‘We're luring her to a bridal show, then we're gonna stuff her in a burlap sack for a few weeks.’
    • ‘After luring her into a warren of back streets, Dadia throttled her and subjected her to a series of indecent assaults.’
    • ‘Low prices and attractive loan options are luring customers like never before.’
    • ‘Rather, it is a lifestyle decision aimed at luring tourists to his property.’
    • ‘He lured both girls into his car under the guise he was a punter and then drove them several miles away.’
    • ‘DJ Hugh started the night off with lots of pop dance music, luring people onto the dance floor.’
    • ‘They still sing to me, sirens luring me limbs akimbo onto the rocks of rye, cocaine, hookers and tropical isles.’
    • ‘It is a pity that the sanctity of the festival should be lost with ersatz Santas luring people to malls.’
    • ‘The Pygmalion effect works by luring us into the conviction that we are capable of achieving the goals that we set.’
    • ‘And wrestling is luring the viewers, no matter how sad a commentary that is about the viewers.’
    tempt, entice, attract, induce, coax, persuade, inveigle, allure, seduce, win over, cajole, beguile, bewitch, ensnare, captivate, enrapture
    decoy, draw
    whet someone's appetite
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1Something that tempts or is used to tempt a person or animal to do something.

    ‘the film industry always has been a glamorous lure for young girls’
    • ‘Ramsbottom has largely shed its image as an industrial centre to become a lure for young families and professionals.’
    • ‘Effective and safe trapping requires knowledge of the habits of beaver, habitat conditions, and presence of nontarget animals as well as knowledge of the trap and lures.’
    temptation, enticement, attraction, pull, draw, appeal
    inducement, allurement, fascination, interest
    decoy, incentive, bait, magnet, siren song, drawing card, carrot, snare, trap
    come-on
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The strongly attractive quality of a person or thing.
      ‘the lure of the exotic East’
      • ‘A chance to fight at the Olympics is obviously hugely attractive as is the lure of the professional game where there is so much money to be made.’
      • ‘Luckily, the lure of dinner was strong and I restrained myself.’
      • ‘A lizard's body size affected its tendency to be attracted to the lure of death adders.’
      • ‘The lure of good money draws professional drivers from many countries to Iraq, but sometimes the whole story is different than you might think.’
      • ‘It is another top attraction; the lure of steam is not to be belittled!’
      • ‘We have seen our skilled nurses and teachers packing up as a result of the lure of more attractive overseas packages.’
      • ‘The drama of the Highlands and the lure of the capital attract the bulk of visitors to Scotland, but there are many other corners of the country that are worthy of attention.’
      • ‘Of course, Lizzie is not the first woman to fall foul of the lure of donning a supposedly-smart two piece.’
      • ‘They were attracted by the lure of a two weeks' free holiday in the sun and a £5,000 pay off to act as drug mules.’
      • ‘For many, the big attraction was the lure of the livestock.’
      • ‘Kenyan officials said the lure of potential wealth attracted younger compatriots and that is when the exploitation could start.’
      • ‘Well, we always thought the lure of easy money attracted people to politics.’
      • ‘Or recognizing the many qualities of his own nature in Pater, was Hopkins stirred to act against the lure of those qualities?’
      • ‘The principle and spirit of democracy could be thrown into garbage when confronting the lure of economical interests.’
      • ‘All but the most discriminating vampires find themselves attracted by the lure of a free brunch buffet on some ditzy blonde's neck.’
      • ‘The lure of beating a bunch of five-year-olds at beach football or Frisbee competitions may seem great, but it looks pathetic.’
      • ‘The provincial Hamiltons are immediately attracted to the lure of the city and soon fall victim to its various temptations.’
      • ‘Few of us are immune to the lure of a stylish piece of furniture or accessory for the home, but all too often the choice can be small for buyers on a limited budget.’
      • ‘I can't resist the lure of an attractive handbag, especially if it is small and sparkly.’
      • ‘And in the process, children become drawn increasingly into the lures of play, of vicarious and sensational experiences far more preferable than work.’
  • 2A type of bait used in fishing or hunting.

    • ‘It didn't matter if you were using lures, baits or flyfishing the swim, the fish were simply not having it.’
    • ‘Whether the invention is a catfish lure or a piece of software at the heart of the web, the inventor has to pay the same fee.’
    • ‘That didn't deter a bunch of fishermen underneath the railway bridge from casting their lures in hopes of catching the big one.’
    • ‘I will divide this section into two, dealing with trolling with lures and baits.’
    • ‘Last year we told you about a fishing lure with triple treble hooks bearing the warning.’
    • ‘When spinning, plug or bait fishing the weight of the lure or bait will take the line out.’
    • ‘Side planers are used to troll lures and baits well out to the side of a moving boat.’
    • ‘Preferred fishing methods are trolling with lures or baits, bottom fishing, jigging, chumming, and spin casting.’
    • ‘If I get into the sport, watch for my caches; they'll be filled with fishing lures.’
    • ‘In the surf, where anglers must wait for herds of giant reds to come their way, natural baits always outfish lures.’
    • ‘Depending on where you are in the world, you'll find either lures, baits or a mix of both going out on these outfits.’
    • ‘Many barbs had broken off when the sharks had been briefly hooked by the fishermen; others had lines and lures attached where they had been cut free.’
    • ‘Five lures, each a meter apart, were strung on each line, and the whole rig was carried to the bottom by heavy lead sinkers about three fingers wide.’
    • ‘Men's motifs are well represented in this category with designs ranging from fishing lures to hunting themes to Neopolitan fleur de lis patterns.’
    • ‘Mangrove jack have appeared in the bottom end of the Brunswick River, although I cannot confirm whether lures or live bait were used.’
    • ‘Fish the two-hook rig on the seabed but lift the rod repeatedly to make the lures and bait work like swimming fish.’
    • ‘For this reason, natural baits and artificial lures worked on or just off bottom are most effective.’
    • ‘It was stocked full of hand made fishing flies, lures, fishing rods, fly-tying material and reels.’
    • ‘A bait rig is a string of very small lures which are lowered to the bottom and raised with short jerky movements.’
    • ‘The usual assortment of spinnerbaits, swimming plugs, topwater lures and soft plastics is sufficient to test the potential of most small and relatively shallow ponds.’
    decoy, fly, troll, jig, plug, teaser
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Sport
      A bunch of feathers with a piece of meat attached to a long string, swung around the head of the falconer to recall a hawk.
      • ‘Hawk owls are routinely attracted to the small lure from nearly a mile away.’
      • ‘Then I noticed something moving - a feathery lure, waving back and forth like a fishing rod.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French luere, of Germanic origin; probably related to German Luder bait.

Pronunciation:

lure

/l(j)ʊə/

Main definitions of lure in English

: lure1lure2

lure2

noun

  • variant spelling of lur

Pronunciation:

lure

/lʊə/