Definition of lunch in English:

lunch

noun

  • A meal eaten in the middle of the day, typically one that is lighter or less formal than an evening meal:

    ‘a light lunch’
    [mass noun] ‘do join us for lunch’
    [as modifier] ‘a lunch meeting’
    • ‘As I ate my packed lunch, I wandered through the tiny cemetery butted against the church.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, Jimmy was in school eating lunch with his friends.’
    • ‘We enjoyed a relaxing leisurely lunch before starting the afternoon session.’
    • ‘We had a quick picnic lunch at one of the wooden tables and set off.’
    • ‘An excellent buffet lunch was prepared and served by the trainees in catering.’
    • ‘They had just finished their lunch in the cafeteria.’
    • ‘The free buffet lunches were appreciated; the 45-minute talk on plagiarism was utterly extraneous.’
    • ‘I started packing my own lunches and planning meals ahead of time.’
    • ‘Try breaking out of routines like always eating lunch in the cafeteria at work.’
    • ‘We were running a little late and I was famished, so we broke a rule and had a light lunch in the coffee shop.’
    • ‘But meanwhile George's mother had cooked a delicious Sunday lunch.’
    • ‘Price also includes breakfast, afternoon tea and a combination of four evening meals and two lunches.’
    • ‘Daily lunches and evening meals are arranged by various organizations and individual donators who make monetary donations that go towards food for the children.’
    • ‘We had a full course buffet lunch at a poolside club restaurant and the food combination was very good.’
    • ‘Next came a fully-fledged restaurant, open throughout the day and for lunches (though not evening meals), which was extended this year to double its original size.’
    • ‘We ordered our lunches and devoured the meal in silence.’
    • ‘He finished his lunch with his friend, Luke, before proceeding to leave his tray at a counter.’
    • ‘There is also a lunch menu, priced at £17 for three courses.’
    • ‘We need to get our school lunch programs back in healthy order.’
    • ‘On Monday, he served just three lunches and three evening meals; on Tuesday, four lunches and no evening meals.’
    evening meal, supper, main meal, repast
    View synonyms

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Eat lunch:

    ‘he told his wife he was lunching with a client’
    • ‘I'll try and meet up with him to walk to our lockers and then lunch together.’
    • ‘It was mid-week so things were quiet; couples were lunching at picnic tables and elderly men and women were lounging around in various states of undress.’
    • ‘Yesterday he walked over the tops and lunched at Dick Hudson's pub before walking on to Riddlesden and Keighley.’
    • ‘Then they met every day at twelve o'clock on the sea-front, lunched and dined together, went for walks, and admired the sea.’
    • ‘I missed breakfast, lunched on three ripe, juicy plums, and dined on a plate of salad with a jacket potato and a slice of very lean pork.’
    • ‘She was a devotee in Swifty's, the successor to her beloved Mortimer's, and she lunched and dined there often.’
    • ‘The girls visited The Chocolate Factory, The Wax museum and Kylemore indoor karting before lunching in Jury's Hotel.’
    • ‘He also spent 30 minutes lunching with farmers in the canteen - on egg-mayonnaise sandwiches - before unveiling a plaque.’
    • ‘After lunching at the captain's table, the youthful troupe was treated to a tour of the vessel and a chance to witness first hand the wonders of advanced communication technology.’
    • ‘‘I was driving a Porsche and lunching at the Ritz - all courtesy of the company's expense account,’ she told Real magazine.’
    • ‘Mick said how lucky it was that the trip went ahead because while they were lunching at a secluded quay, away from civilisation, they heard children screaming and shouting.’
    • ‘We made drawings of gravestones of dead monks, lunched in local pub and had a swell trip.’
    • ‘Life on board involved early-morning swims, leisurely breakfasts and then short passages between sheltered coves where we lunched and swam for several hours.’
    • ‘If you're getting a queasy feeling about lunching, dining or having coffee with someone you've met on the job, there's probably a reason.’
    • ‘Although he is still lunching with the company's bosses and touring their petrochemical plant, he has fitted in a meeting with the local environmental group first.’
    • ‘Whatever he might have added was cut off as they had reached the small patio where they'd lunched the previous day.’
    • ‘During my painstaking journey back to the table, I pass the two of them lunching together.’
    • ‘A couple of hours later, the O'Briens are lunching in the café.’
    • ‘Even those who had for weeks recited the political rationale of the meeting found themselves stunned at the sight of a British prime minister lunching with one of the world's most notorious dictators.’
    • ‘I'll report here on any progress he makes but I wanted to mention what a great time I had lunching with all those Frank Buxtons today.’
    have a meal, partake of food, take food, consume food, feed
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object] Take (someone) out for lunch:
      ‘public relations people lunch their clients there’
      • ‘One of the world's biggest investment banks desperately wants in, and recently lunched the Senator.’
      • ‘Their lobbyists breakfast, lunch and dine our elected representatives every day.’
      • ‘He was lunched by the prime minister and dined by the president.’
      • ‘Then an official of the Foreign Office lunched my editor and told him my report was ‘not helpful’.’
      • ‘He lunched and dined the likes of the editors of the Daily Mail and the Sun, and wooed them by emphasizing how he would tackle the rising welfare bill and the moral chaos it engendered.’
      • ‘The North Korean leader, in expansive mood while lunching southern media moguls, suggested a repeat in September and October.’
      • ‘She was lunched at a popular political and media haunt - all for the purpose of public consumption.’

Phrases

  • do lunch

    • informal Meet for lunch:

      ‘you're a doll—we'll do lunch!’
      • ‘But most of them are going to be far too busy doing lunch and phoning people.’
      • ‘Modern fiction editors are too busy reading synopses and doing lunch to have any time to think about structure.’
      • ‘Actually, I was thinking that maybe you might like to do lunch, if you aren't too busy.’
      • ‘Mario had made plans to meet up with his older brother and do lunch at a restaurant close by.’
      • ‘He is my former producer from Washington, he said he would take the train to meet me and we would do lunch.’
      • ‘When I'm visiting home this is one of the places I like to meet friends, it's a good place to do lunch of afternoon drinks.’
      • ‘I was wondering if we could do lunch and discuss business.’
      • ‘I'm sure you already told her we'd do lunch today, and you have it all set up, and asking me was just a formality.’
      • ‘Give me a call, Steve, and let's do lunch sometime.’
      • ‘We hadn't seen each other since before Christmas, so they brought my gifts (I'd dropped mine for them off at their house on Thanksgiving) and we did lunch at Hometown Buffet.’
  • out to lunch

    • informal Temporarily not in command of one's mental faculties.

      • ‘I count the editor of the Independent as a friend, so the main reason I hesitate to say that he is out to lunch on this issue is that I was out to dinner with him last night.’
      • ‘Let us just say that, if not exactly out to lunch, she was certainly taking a coffee break and regrets her previous advice.’
      • ‘The waiters are a bit out to lunch and service was a bit slow, but we were not in a rush.’
      • ‘Many gay marriage opponents are just plain out to lunch.’
      • ‘I think unfortunately this doctor and her staff are a bit out to lunch… they seem unaware of what they are doing.’
      • ‘He's out to lunch on this offshore thing but it's playing well at home.’
      • ‘The message was clear: parliament is out of touch as well as out to lunch.’
      • ‘It's no use, because his support cast is either out to lunch, or not listening.’
      • ‘Of course, some people think I'm out to lunch because we don't do that in America.’
  • there's no such thing as a free lunch

    • proverb It isn't possible to get something for nothing.

      • ‘So again, it underlines the fact that there's no such thing as a free lunch in the investment area.’
      • ‘They say that there's no such thing as a free lunch, but it is possible to get fat while your employer helps to pick up the bill!’
      • ‘It turns out that the best of the free software programs and Web services nullify the notion that there's no such thing as a free lunch.’
      • ‘Everyone knows there's no such thing as a free lunch.’
      • ‘We all know that there's no such thing as a free lunch but the monies involved in going to see your county in action in the championship isn't for the faint-hearted.’
      • ‘However, there's no such thing as a free lunch: those toys that are so attractive to children have a price, as the US is discovering.’
      • ‘In the diplomatic world, there's no such thing as a free lunch and Arab leaders are unlikely to back down on that condition.’
      • ‘If there's one thing I know, it's that there's no such thing as a free lunch.’
      • ‘Of course, there's no such thing as a free lunch, and a day off now has to be made up later.’
      • ‘Whoever said there's no such thing as a free lunch hasn't been on the Web lately.’

Origin

Early 19th century: abbreviation of luncheon.

Pronunciation:

lunch

/lʌn(t)ʃ/