Main definitions of lumber in English

: lumber1lumber2lumber3

lumber1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Move in a slow, heavy, awkward way:

    ‘a truck lumbered past’
    • ‘Trucks steadily lumber across the bridge linking the countries, ferrying North Korean raw materials into China and Chinese manufactured goods to market in North Korea.’
    • ‘What films remain of Jess show him not to be lumbering and slow but rather agile and balanced.’
    • ‘A large and heavily muscled guard lumbered past his door.’
    • ‘The freighter lumbered awkwardly toward the base.’
    • ‘For as long as I can remember, he has looked like an elephant, heavy and lumbering with big ears and baggy wrinkled skin.’
    • ‘But the humpback gives the lie to the notion that things of great bulk move only by lumbering.’
    • ‘A local handyman would lumber past each day on his way from odd-job to odd-job, eying little twelve-year-old Laura with a smile and a hello.’
    • ‘The heavy steel door swung open and Grimes lumbered awkwardly through the entrance, key ring bouncing from the ridges of fat around his waist.’
    • ‘I saw walruses and heard their grunts as they lumbered slowly off their ice floes.’
    • ‘Both were big and lumbering and unfeasibly tough, and it could be said that neither had an awful lot to speak of between the ears, but they were a family unit, and both cared for the other far more than they cared for themselves.’
    • ‘But the last two seasons, his moves became lumbering.’
    • ‘Manta rays cruise past, turtles lumber along, sharks scope the scene, the odd octopus creeps along the ocean floor, and further out, the whale sharks make their way north.’
    • ‘They moved into the flat upstairs and they lumbered about like huge beasts, stomping up and down with no thought of the excess noise being transmitted to my ears below.’
    • ‘The maids there didn't even look up as he lumbered past ovens and drying herbs.’
    • ‘An orange dump truck lumbers up the street followed by workers with picks and sledgehammers.’
    • ‘We watched on TV from a helicopter vantage point, as a caravan of five fire trucks lumbered up the vacant, closed-down interstate to battle the blaze.’
    • ‘The research showed they would later unfailingly lumber over to the farmers who gave them food and shun the others.’
    • ‘Not many ordinary people were out on the streets, but there was a heavy population of police and army trucks lumbered ponderously around.’
    • ‘I slung her over my shoulder and lumbered down the stairs to throw her out on the street.’
    • ‘Kerry lumbers off his stool and seems a bit slowed down.’
    lurch, stumble, shamble, shuffle, reel, waddle
    trudge, clump, stump, plod, tramp, walk clumsily, walk heavily, stamp, stomp, thump, thud, bang
    sprauchle
    traik
    clumsy, awkward, heavy-footed, blundering, bumbling, inept, maladroit, uncoordinated, ungainly, oafish, like a bull in a china shop, ungraceful, gauche, lumpish, cumbersome, ponderous, laborious, stolid
    clodhopping, hulking
    lubberly
    galumph
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English lomere, perhaps symbolic of clumsy movement.

Pronunciation:

lumber

/ˈlʌmbə/

Main definitions of lumber in English

: lumber1lumber2lumber3

lumber2

noun

  • 1British Articles of furniture or other household items that are no longer useful and inconveniently take up storage space:

    [as modifier] ‘a lumber room’
    • ‘In trad Japanese houses, this whole thing is supposed to be placed in a special location built for it between the first and second floors, which is not possible in our house, so the image was leaned against a pile of lumber to party with us.’
    • ‘I grabbed many cans of Lysol, loaded them into the car, and continued to the storage room where lumber lay about.’
    • ‘Hence perhaps why much is made of the variety of subject matter in Sebald's novels, like a lumber room in a rundown mansion ready for an enthusiast's rummage.’
    jumble, clutter, odds and ends, bits and pieces, bits and bobs, rummage, bric-a-brac, oddments, miscellanea, sundries, knick-knacks, flotsam and jetsam, cast-offs, white elephants, stuff, things
    View synonyms
  • 2North American Timber sawn into rough planks or otherwise partly prepared:

    ‘he sat at a makeshift desk of unfinished lumber’
    [as modifier] ‘a lumber company’
    • ‘You can frame raised beds with lumber or form unframed beds like ours by shaping soil into level, flat-sided mounds about 8 inches high.’
    • ‘Or you can build a simple three or four side enclosure out of scrap lumber.’
    • ‘The engineered beams span longer runs and withstand higher stresses than traditional sawn lumber.’
    • ‘A major trade dispute is brewing over the export of Canadian softwood lumber to the United States.’
    • ‘Made with standard size lumber, and built from full-size plans, just a handful of common tools are required to build this project in a weekend.’
    • ‘If cut for lumber, this single tree would yield 600, 120 board feet, the makings of 40 five-room houses.’
    • ‘Treated lumber has been around for decades, and is generally considered to be a very safe product.’
    • ‘Natural beauty is integral to every piece of redwood lumber.’
    • ‘In the face of devastation caused by widespread deforestation, some furniture makers are turning to alternative sources of lumber.’
    • ‘Born in Glasgow in 1850, he migrated at the age of four to Quebec, where his father built up a lucrative career in shipbuilding and lumber.’
    • ‘Pieces of lumber appeared, were carefully measured and then taken back to the workshop for fine tuning.’
    • ‘Penetrating stains or preservative treatments are preferred for rough sawn lumber.’
    • ‘The project calls only for standard size pine lumber that is readily available at your local home improvement center.’
    • ‘Simple and inexpensive to build, our tree seat is made from standard size lumber.’
    • ‘Some connectors are made for standard sizes of solid sawn lumber.’
    • ‘Special precautions need to be taken when cutting pressure treated lumber.’
    • ‘He also sells lumber created from fallen trees on his own farm.’
    • ‘At first sight it appears to be an ordinary piece of pine lumber set on the floor.’
    • ‘The other two projects are simply made from standard-size lumber.’
    • ‘A total of six ships have put in here asking for both furs and lumber in the past two months.’
    timber, wood, planks, planking
    View synonyms

verb

  • 1British usually be lumbered withinformal [with object] Burden (someone) with something unwanted:

    ‘the banks do not want to be lumbered with a building that they cannot sell’
    • ‘Low cost of ownership through self-tuning, self-management capabilities means suppliers are not lumbered with costly end-user support, and end-users do not have to employ database administrators.’
    • ‘Brussels may be the home of the EU and, in some eyes, lumbered with that organisation's bureaucratic and dull reputation, but nothing could be further from the truth.’
    • ‘And finally - the question that every interviewer asks - how did he get lumbered with such an appallingly unattractive surname?’
    • ‘Given that it is unlikely that the State will wish to be lumbered with the crushing financial burden of this obsolete dinosaur from a decadent age, an interested body of Sligo citizens should be formed immediately.’
    • ‘It is also alleged the group has been lumbered with a huge excess of stock which could involve write-offs of as much as 15 million.’
    • ‘Finally the LEA was lumbered with meeting increased pension contributions - an added £300,000 bill.’
    • ‘Their real fear is that Hutchison will appeal and they'll be lumbered with the costs.’
    • ‘Had the ejection of Beagle 2 failed, Mars Express would have been lumbered with the extra weight for the rest of its mission and its orbital survey of Mars would have been severely hampered.’
    • ‘The bad news is that, apparently, work at Bow Road is due to continue until July 2005, nine months later than originally planned, so you're lumbered with my regular renovation updates for another year at least.’
    • ‘As I was one of only two blokes in the Ilkley store, I got lumbered with a lot of stockroom work - spending one memorable hot August dealing with deliveries of Christmas trees, cards, and decorations.’
    • ‘Hospital trusts are also often lumbered with mounting legal costs and bills for experts to investigate any allegations before the case can finally be resolved and the doctor is either reinstated or sacked.’
    • ‘I didn't end up with it purely because of its feel, though: I also didn't want to be lumbered with the vast amounts of junk all the other keyboards were saddled with.’
    • ‘Deregulation opened entry to all comers, and the new airlines were not lumbered with labour contracts negotiated in the era in which regulators allowed carriers to use their monopolies to pass their costs on to captive travellers.’
    • ‘One of them usually gets a top-of-the-range model, but another is lumbered with a mobile phone camera and expected to perform miracles.’
    • ‘Regrettably that means that South Lakeland will be lumbered with staying in a two-tier Cumbria at least until the next time local government reorganisation is forced back to the top of the political agenda.’
    • ‘The boom times are over - not least for those borrowers who have suddenly been lumbered with their lenders' costly standard rates at the end of a fixed-rate deal.’
    • ‘Even the Americans are lumbered with that one picture.’
    • ‘Of course if Labour wanted to be really cunning, they could now drop the plan and leave the Tories with the option of a hilarious U-turn or being lumbered with an unpopular policy they didn't really want.’
    • ‘Surely it must be better to capitalise on Bradford's assets than be lumbered with an American consultancy of unknown competence, whose prime motivation will be to maximise its fee?’
    • ‘A larger firm paying £200,000 per year on the same energy split will be lumbered with an extra £25,000.’
    burden, saddle, encumber, hamper, impose on, load, oppress, trouble, tax
    land, dump something on someone
    View synonyms
  • 2North American usually as noun lumbering[no object] Cut and prepare forest timber for transport and sale:

    ‘the traditional resource industries of the nation, chiefly fishing and lumbering’
    • ‘Fishing, like lumbering, was in decline, and enterprises which produced only red ink were being quickly jettisoned by those who didn't like that colour.’
    • ‘Agriculture, lumbering, mining and the fish habitat are considered in Chapter 8.’
    • ‘New England farmers are also engaged in lumbering and raising livestock.’
    • ‘We were forced to purchase rice and wheat with the money we got from lumbering.’
    • ‘As part of the agreement, Pacific Lumber agrees to strict monitoring of and restrictions on lumbering in its other forest holdings.’
    • ‘Currently, he says, enough waste biomass is being generated by lumbering, by farming, and as urban waste to meet 10 percent of U.S. transportation needs.’
    • ‘In the late 18th and early 19th centuries lumbering, seal hunting, and whaling attracted a few European settlers to New Zealand.’
    • ‘Fishing and lumbering became major enterprises.’
    • ‘He and his group expected to have a hard go of it in Hokkaido at first, and for a few years crops were poor, but after 1913 their life settled down thanks to the increasing income from lumbering.’
    • ‘Early nineteenth-century colonial economies were based primarily on agriculture, lumbering, and fishing.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: perhaps from lumber; later associated with obsolete lumber ‘pawnbroker's shop’.

Pronunciation:

lumber

/ˈlʌmbə/

Main definitions of lumber in English

: lumber1lumber2lumber3

lumber3

verb

[WITH OBJECT]Scottish
informal
  • Casually strike up a relationship with (a prospective sexual partner):

    ‘he lumbered her from a pub in London’

noun

Scottish
informal
  • A person regarded as a prospective sexual partner:

    ‘they end the evening in a disco where they wait for a lumber’
    • ‘In the admittedly unlikely event of his coming back to see how Scotland is progressing, he will have no problem getting a lumber.’
    • ‘The hub was the union where, he said, ‘you could eat, drink and find yourself a lumber for the night, or whatever’.’

Origin

1960s: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

lumber

/ˈlʌmbə/