Definition of lumbar in English:

lumbar

adjective

  • Relating to the lower part of the back.

    ‘backache in the lumbar region’
    • ‘As the lumbar spinal canal shrinks, the nerves that go through it are squeezed.’
    • ‘Metastatic disease in the lumbar area can cause spinal cord compression.’
    • ‘And the driver's seat was perfectly shaped to support the lumbar region - a joy after a hard day's work.’
    • ‘Below the lumbar spine is the sacrum, which is actually five vertebrae fused into one bone.’
    • ‘The scientists then injected those neurons into the lumbar spinal cords of the paralyzed rats.’
    • ‘The number of ribs may be increased by addition at either the cervical or lumbar end of the series.’
    • ‘This guide is designed for people with a herniated lumbar disk, not a herniated cervical disk.’
    • ‘Bone mineral density at the lumbar spine was assessed at baseline and after one and two years of contraceptive use.’
    • ‘It often projects through to the back in the midline lumbar area where it may be as intense as it is anteriorly.’
    • ‘The lumbar form of transverse process may be present in the eleventh thoracic vertebra.’
    • ‘The waist is the house of the kidneys, deficiency causes soreness and weakness of the lumbar region.’
    • ‘Although buttock pain may originate from the hip, the lumbar spine is the usual source.’
    • ‘Their origins are generally between the first and third lumbar vertebrae.’
    • ‘The eighth and ninth thoracic vertebrae and the fifth lumbar vertebra were crushed.’
    • ‘They are usually used to scan the lumbar region (the lower back) and the hips.’
    • ‘The lower part of the back, the lumbar region, is composed of 5 vertebrae known as L1 to L5.’
    • ‘This section passes through the upper half of the fourth lumbar vertebra.’
    • ‘The block is most often at belt level in the middle and lower lumbar spine.’
    • ‘The patient rests the dorsum of the hand on the back in the lumbar area.’
    • ‘The contribution to the nerve from the second lumbar nerve may be absent.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from medieval Latin lumbaris, from Latin lumbus loin.

Pronunciation:

lumbar

/ˈlʌmbə/