Definition of low comedy in English:

low comedy

noun

mass noun
  • Comedy in which the subject and its treatment border on farce.

    • ‘Readers like Ruskin, who weep while they read Don Quixote, and readers who merely decline to smile, dismissing the knight's punishment as low comedy, have been bypassed by something essential.’
    • ‘He has an almost Shakespearian desire to mix high drama with low comedy, though Shakespeare rarely had characters doing both.’
    • ‘But I don't think that we should be held up that - I mean, Shakespearian plays had lots of low comedy.’
    • ‘At times, it was played for beauty and poignancy; at others, almost sneeringly, as low comedy.’
    • ‘Political commentators ranted about disobedient Old Europe and its psychic maladies while Congress descended to low comedy.’
    • ‘A cheap shot of low comedy can make one laugh the first time one hears it, but the second time around one has to examine why one found it funny in the first place.’
    • ‘It has involved high drama, low comedy, farce, shameless over-acting and an out-of-control budget.’
    • ‘The production houses that churn out soaps for the mini-screen in quick succession have taken it for granted that tear-jerkers and low comedy are in great demand among family audiences.’
    • ‘Every time it stoops to low comedy (which is often… there are oral sex and flatulent jokes), it tosses a more sophisticated, character-based gag at you.’
    • ‘His blend of great good humor, high taste, low comedy, and refusal to condescend to anybody, regardless of who they were or where they came from, almost certainly can't be duplicated in today's mass media.’
    • ‘He is equally capable of low comedy- the dramatic opening scene offers a delicious example of gross-out humour - and strong emotion.’
    • ‘He plays low comedy high as it gets, and it would have been enough.’
    • ‘It's a skillful blend of low comedy and melodrama that expertly tugs audience heartstrings.’
    • ‘In Act 3 of King Lear we witness the emergence and gradual ascendance of Lear's soul, in a series of scenes structurally akin to the low comedy written for the great clowns.’