Definition of low blow in English:

low blow

noun

Boxing
  • 1An unlawful blow that lands below an opponent's waist.

    ‘the referee hadn't seen the low blow and declined to call a timeout’
    • ‘In the twelfth McGuigan, flailing away in apparent desperation, was penalized a point by referee Richard Steele for a low blow.’
    • ‘Ottke was left gasping for breath by an accidental low blow in the ninth.’
    • ‘Ref Rudy Charles went down and Jarrett hit Rhodes with a low blow and got Charles' belt.’
    • ‘In round 8 Yates again interfered in the action when he deducted a point off of Soto-Karas for an inadvertent low blow.’
    • ‘Then in the eighth round Ruiz had to wait five minutes to resume after another Johnson low blow.’
    • ‘He scored a knockdown and Trinidad got penalized a point for a low blow.’
    • ‘At one point Tito threw a low blow which entitled Mayorga to a five minute rest.’
    • ‘When you're in the ring you'll hear the roar of the crowd changing depending on the on-screen action; throw an illegal low blow and you'll summon tons of boo's and disgruntled reactions.’
    • ‘But each knock-down was ruled out as Moore was adjudged to have caught his opponent with low blows.’
    • ‘Again, Garcia was warned by referee Sam Garza for throwing a low blow.’
    • ‘I saw him perform that same routine once against a fighter who'd landed probably two dozen low blows in the course of the match.’
    • ‘He was deducted two points for low blows.’
    • ‘The only blemish to Freitas' night was a point deduction for a low blow in round number ten.’
    1. 1.1 A comment or tactic regarded as unfair or unkind.
      ‘his mockery of Elizabeth's work seemed like a low blow’
      • ‘But having him degrade you in such a way, I think, was a low blow.’
      • ‘But it doesn't follow from my post that I am trying to exclude anything and ‘elitist’ is a low blow.’
      • ‘Workers have copped the ultimate low blow - being forced to teach their Brazilian successors tricks-of-the-trade during their last weeks at the plant.’
      • ‘You know, he delivered some low blows, but they weren't questioning his patriotism.’
      • ‘For a moment, he looks almost moved, vulnerable even, so I decide to strike a low blow.’
      • ‘We want our teachers valued and respected, we want to support them and encourage them but these low blows that supposedly indicate why teachers should be given a pay rise make that support and respect difficult to maintain.’
      • ‘It's a pretty low blow to use it, even in a fight.’
      • ‘That's a low blow Trev, the fact that his wife of two months tried the sushi and he didn't.’
      • ‘The SNP supporter then struck a low blow, musing that it would cost less to hire him to make films in Scotland than it was costing to build the new parliament.’
      • ‘I guess the Republicans are forced to go for the low blow here.’
      • ‘Sure it was a low blow, but it was something I didn't actually care about at the moment since it was clear she had no intention of sugarcoating whatever she wanted to say.’
      • ‘Arresting a journalist for spying is a pretty low blow, and I expect nothing more than a show trial at best.’
      • ‘Officials from both parties say the typical Dayton resident has grown weary of glitzy ad campaigns and superficial low blows.’
      • ‘For a group who had built professional pride around their status as safety and security professionals it was the ultimate low blow.’
      • ‘That move was described by her colleagues as a low blow.’
      • ‘In this age of partisan attacks and free-for-all political smearing, we've seen one low blow follow another after another.’
      • ‘This was not the time to fight, not the time to exchange cheap shots and low blows for sure.’
      • ‘A fair comparison on records is never a low blow.’
      • ‘To terrorize celebrities' parents because they are more vulnerable is a low blow.’
      • ‘Of course, being a discerning and witty individual, (otherwise you wouldn't be here) you aren't going to resort to such a low blow.’
      • ‘My first choice so sickened me, and it was such a low blow, that I was dissuaded from using it.’
      • ‘It was a low blow, and possibly a political misjudgment, but it reflected the determination in government ranks yesterday to fight back and quash a rebellion that could humiliate the prime minister.’
      • ‘He then struck a low blow, musing that it would cost less to hire him to make films in Scotland than it was costing to build the new parliament.’
      • ‘And it's very hard to see where discussing his misuse of federal education money was somehow a low blow.’
      • ‘But having him degrade you in such a way, I think, you know, here again was a low blow.’
      • ‘They will say that criticism of his record on security-related issues unfairly impugns his patriotism and is therefore a low blow.’
      • ‘But also because it sets up every news outlet for the same low blow.’