Definition of lovely in English:

lovely

adjective

  • 1Very beautiful or attractive.

    ‘lovely views’
    ‘she looked lovely’
    • ‘The building looks lovely at the moment.’
    • ‘I was working with a really lovely girl who I get on with really well.’
    • ‘Now he had a very lovely lady on his arm.’
    • ‘He could see that Carmen had indeed been quite lovely a couple decades earlier.’
    • ‘It's in a fantastic location on the coast, with sea-views out of one side, and views over a lovely lake from the other.’
    • ‘Emma is a really lovely girl, always smiling.’
    • ‘It may not be four star like the one in Berlin, but it's a great deal nicer with a lovely view over the lake at breakfast.’
    • ‘My, don't you look absolutely lovely in that dress.’
    • ‘Many lovely images were produced and participants were delighted with their craft work.’
    • ‘And there it is, lovely to behold.’
    • ‘This addition to the lake will add much to the area and will attract more people to view its lovely scenery.’
    • ‘We have indulged in some mountain biking and hiking here which is always rewarded with lovely views.’
    • ‘The cabins were located on the side of hill with lots of deck room, clean amenities inside and lovely views.’
    • ‘Out back there was a lovely big garden with an orchard and a greenhouse.’
    • ‘However, I will often look at an article that my lovely wife recommends.’
    • ‘She realised that now, confronted with this vast expanse of lovely, beautiful space.’
    • ‘He had taken a lovely, sweet, beautiful girl and hurt her terribly, all in the name of revenge.’
    • ‘Even when she was sick, Hector decided she looked quite lovely.’
    • ‘The sun had set, and the sky was that lovely shade of blue between twilight and true night.’
    • ‘The rooms are all comfortable, with lovely views out over Perthshire and down to the loch that gives the hotel its name.’
    beautiful, pretty, as pretty as a picture, attractive, good-looking, appealing, handsome, adorable, exquisite, sweet, personable, charming
    scenic, picturesque, pleasing, easy on the eye
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1informal Very pleasant or enjoyable; delightful.
      ‘we've had a lovely day’
      ‘how lovely to see you!’
      • ‘Those who made the effort to come along enjoyed a lovely meal and an enjoyable night.’
      • ‘The weather was lovely and an enjoyable time was had by all who participated.’
      • ‘Her eyes squint and her lips pulse making her laugh even more lovely to hear.’
      • ‘I'm going to see him, and some other lovely people, and I'm really very excited.’
      • ‘Despite all this, the cookies tasted lovely.’
      • ‘There is nothing more enjoyable than playing on a well-kept grass court on a lovely day.’
      • ‘It fit the bill perfectly and we had a lovely evening with wonderful food.’
      • ‘I admit to having a crush on him - he has the most gorgeous brown eyes, a wonderful smile and a lovely sense of humour.’
      • ‘When I rang a few days later she was having a lovely time, marvelling particularly about the scenery.’
      • ‘This was a very enjoyable experience for the choir and a lovely way to start Christmas Week.’
      • ‘I especially enjoyed the train trip and the company of lovely people in the group.’
      • ‘I had a lovely evening with some tasty food, delicious wine and entertaining company.’
      • ‘I watch their shows and they don't do anything to suggest that they're anything other than lovely people.’
      • ‘Plus, his shirt was nice and warm, like flannel, and it smelled lovely.’
      • ‘He's always telling me how lovely Paris is and how it hardly ever rains there.’
      • ‘They were eating mangoes, which smelled lovely, and I said as much.’
      • ‘She's lovely in person, but her speeches are a bit boring if you ask me.’
      • ‘Friday was a lovely day, and this route seemed so pleasant that I though it would be nice to walk into town this way on Saturday.’
      • ‘Again this sounds absolutely lovely, but who would end up paying for it in practice?’
      • ‘Night fell swiftly and the moon smiled upon the plantation that lovely August evening.’
      delightful, very pleasant, very nice, very agreeable, marvellous, wonderful, sublime, superb, fine, magical, enchanting, captivating
      View synonyms

noun

informal
  • 1An attractive woman or girl.

    ‘a bevy of lovelies’
    • ‘Surrounded by so many young lovelies (I have often wondered if there are any girls over 25 in Pattaya), how can we compete?’
    • ‘He was with 10 friends who were all eyeing a succession of naked lovelies when one girl approached the celebrity and suggested they drink some shots together.’
    • ‘Conway is busy wrestling with the amorous attentions of a couple of lovelies.’
    • ‘At a recent party at the Playboy mansion, rather than chatting up the busty lovelies, he spent the whole evening talking to his idol, a San Francisco Giants baseball player.’
    • ‘It doesn't contain any bug-eyed monsters, bearded Zen masters or bouffanted, Lycra-clad lovelies.’
    • ‘The three lovelies were bereft of canteen, maps, sleeping gear, and even food, as they trudged into God's country with only their beauty and their image to protect them.’
    • ‘Sinuous and scented lovelies shimmered about.’
    • ‘Perhaps they are perturbed by reports of young people recklessly taking the day off work to join The Sun's bikini-clad lovelies on beaches around the country.’
    • ‘Will the tiara that has graced Sligo's lovelies for 14 years be made redundant with a new one from this year's organisers taking its place?’
    • ‘I lived in Southampton for years and that was wall-to-wall lovelies.’
    • ‘And there were more than a few of those lovelies gathered to honor the designer.’
    • ‘This is the place to spot the label-clad lovelies sipping their brandy sours, often accompanied by half of the racing drivers on the Formula One circuit.’
    • ‘Even odder than the choice of sci-fi lovelies is the choice of episodes.’
    • ‘And the 26-year-old soon had a stream of scantily-clad lovelies vying for his attention.’
    • ‘The only difference was he had a legion of lovelies in tow, who spoke in hushed tones of Simon being ‘quietly confident’.’
    • ‘He has saved the world from nuclear destruction and chemical warfare, bedded an endless stream of lovelies and made himself Scotland's best known cinematic export.’
    • ‘I called over the girl that was hovering around, protecting all the lovelies in that corner of the room.’
    • ‘Backed by besuited lovelies Ferry next sang the suitably raunchy ‘Can't Let Go’.’
    • ‘I've taken up going to the gym on a regular basis, and not just to stare at the nubile lovelies.’
    • ‘The luscious lovelies were to play a pivotal role in the ensuing drama.’
    beautiful woman, belle, vision, charmer, enchantress, venus, goddess, beauty queen, english rose, picture, seductress
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Used as an affectionate form of address.
      ‘don't worry, my lovely’
      • ‘Oh, my lovelies, if only I could talk about my job.’
      • ‘‘Hello lovelies,’ croons Carrie into the shop window, addressing a perfect pair of pink and green shoes.’
      • ‘I'll try and post again tomorrow my lovelies, but things are absolutely hectic in work so at the moment, so you never know…’
      • ‘So, until I'm back my lovelies, until Tuesday when I'm sat at my desk, tired, flat and wishing I'd finished the marketing flier before I'd left, until then have a lovely, lovely weekend.’

Phrases

  • lovely jubbly

    • informal Used to express delight or approval.

      ‘fish and chips and a few beers on the way back from a match—lovely jubbly!’
      • ‘As part of a bag approaching one hundred pounds Val had two Crucians weighing three twelve and four pound exactly, lovely jubbly!’
      • ‘Swindonians will have a lovely jubbly time tomorrow when the town plays host to the stars of Only Fools and Horses.’
      • ‘Anna and Jess wandered up, and got interviewed too! Lovely jubbly.’
      • ‘So, I say… good for them… jolly good show old chap etc… lovely jubbly… bring it on.’
      • ‘He reckons the pure spring water he's discovered on his land is lovely jubbly.’
      • ‘I can see it now someone who did the same thing 30 years before would have to let them in and pay extra taxes for the too. Lovely Jubbly!’

Origin

Old English luflic (see love, -ly).

Pronunciation

lovely

/ˈlʌvli/