Main definitions of lop in English

: lop1lop2

lop1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Cut off (a branch, limb, or twig) from the main body of a tree.

    ‘they lopped off more branches to save the tree’
    • ‘He took out his chopper and lopped off the branches that came in his way.’
    • ‘Big branches and branches only on the side of overhanging wires are lopped off, leaving the tree unbalanced.’
    • ‘The tops are lopped off because the branches spread, and would give too much shade.’
    • ‘Others had been lopped off, or even worse, scorched… the number of dead branches greatly increasing around one-third of the way down.’
    • ‘This month, a local council lopped the branches off conker trees to stop children hurting themselves and the trees are to be replaced with a different species.’
    • ‘Even with half of the tree already lopped off, it's still far too big for our garden and it blocks out the sun from the flowers at the top end for much of the day.’
    • ‘After lopping down branches from the trees, he drove it into the pond outside his house.’
    • ‘And there is no doubt the tree has had its lower branches lopped off in past years as a consequence, spoiling the overall impression for everyone.’
    • ‘Many of the native branches have been lopped off.’
    • ‘When there are electrical outages, some people say you should have lopped off more branches.’
    • ‘Yesterday tree-cutting crews lopped off most of the branches from the trees on the corner: I'm really surprised the trees can live with this few leaves.’
    • ‘The inescapable conclusion after reading the book is that we are not just dealing with a few unhealthy branches which can be lopped off restoring the tree to health.’
    • ‘On one bend, on the hill above is a tree that's had a few of it's branches lopped off.’
    • ‘Fortunately the people responsible for its safe arrival had brought their own forester along with them and, with the permission of the house owner, he was able to climb the tree and lop off the offending branches.’
    • ‘Trim any bushes and lop tree branches that are close to your house, as these could break windows in a gale.’
    1. 1.1Remove branches from (a tree)
      ‘they had lopped some trees without permission’
      • ‘SEVERAL 60-year-old trees were lopped at the Park last week, prompting an angry reaction from residents.’
      • ‘The problem is not without solution, for if trees are lopped methodically, they can still give a large quantity of fodder, and yet not become weak and scraggy.’
      • ‘Best practices on lopping and grazing management are, for instance, being widely disseminated to other rearers.’
      • ‘The best example is forest growth - trees, while growing, absorb CO2 and emit it after the tree is lopped and processed.’
      • ‘He explained that trees, though they are cut and lopped, grow up again quickly, but if men are destroyed, it is not easy to get them again.’
      • ‘Some 30 damaged trees had to be lopped and pruned in an attempt to preserve them as well as deprive any returning bats of potential nesting sites.’
      • ‘Having lopped the tree to some extent but not so significantly as to affect its total height, he then dug a trench round the root bole of the tree.’
      • ‘They are concerned over the structure of the tree and have requested the tree to be lopped.’
      • ‘When lopping, make a preliminary cut underneath the branch and then complete the cut from the top.’
      • ‘I think the convoluted branches were caused by someone who lopped the tree very drastically at one stage.’
      • ‘Soon after he realised that two of the trees kept a lot of light out of the bungalow so he decided to have them lopped.’
      • ‘Earlier in the day the householder had a call from a man offering tree lopping and gardening services.’
      • ‘Several months ago I had to ask the current owner to remove a limb from my rockery and he informed me that Council allow him to lop this tree.’
      • ‘The height/size of the tree will be reduced by lopping and pruning.’
      • ‘He had lopped the tree back severely during the winter. Its shape was ugly and stunted.’
    2. 1.2informal Remove (something regarded as unnecessary or burdensome)
      ‘the new rail link lops an hour off journey times’
      • ‘The move was welcomed by industry leaders, while homeowners could see £12 lopped from monthly payments on an average £80,000 mortgage.’
      • ‘When layers of process and staff surround every appointment, the extremes - good and bad - tend to be lopped off.’
      • ‘Banks and building societies will lop 20% off the headline rate, and higher - rate taxpayers will be chased for another fifth by the Inland Revenue.’
      • ‘But the committee was only able to lop off a small fraction of the fees.’
      • ‘This gives me even more incentive to do the swimathon as the training will help lop off a few pounds.’
      • ‘Investors no longer persuaded that unprofitable units of a media empire make up for their bottom-line shortcomings by contributing content, will demand the company lop them off.’
      • ‘If a company has more than 100 full-time employees who've worked longer than six months, then it must give workers notice before it lops off a huge chunk of its workforce.’
      • ‘That release had an incomplete 1.66: 1 aspect ratio, lopping off some crucial information, albeit not as much as a fullscreen presentation would have.’
      • ‘A compromise was reached when 30 centimetres was lopped off the surface, leaving enough gradient to constitute a slope while appeasing opposition clubs that had been troubled by the rise.’
      • ‘To maintain the differential, extra bands would need to be added at the top end of the scale, whilst lopping off those disused bands at the bottom, which is ludicrous.’
      • ‘And I didn't even ask Annie if she had to get her locks lopped in real life to be in the movie.’
      • ‘I recently decided to lop off my boring girl hair and decided it was worth a trip to Newcastle to have Jamie do it.’
      • ‘I enjoyed watching her work in her so-called summer dungarees, which were actually just old coveralls with the legs lopped off below the hip pockets.’
      • ‘It lopped 10 per cent off everything in store for 24 hours.’
      • ‘One broker believes that a further €15 million to €18 million can be lopped off the debt even if earnings remain flat.’
      • ‘At the World Championships in July, Crocker edged past the favorite in the 100 meter butterfly, lopping more than a second off his own best time and stunning most everyone who watched.’

noun

  • [mass noun] Branches and twigs lopped off trees.

    ‘in many forests they took the lop and top, and in some cases the stump, of trees’
    • ‘Removal of felling debris (lop and top) for use as a biofuel generally entails a gradual acidification and impoverishment of the soil.’
    • ‘The discarded lop and top is a potential source of wood fuel.’
    • ‘Since fuelwood is derived largely from small trees, coppice and lop and top, either new uses have to be found for surplus wood from these sources or else it is left standing or lying wasted in the forest.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as a noun): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

lop

/lɒp/

Main definitions of lop in English

: lop1lop2

lop2

verb

[NO OBJECT]North american
Archaic
  • 1 Hang loosely or limply; droop.

    ‘a stomach that lopped over his belt’
    • ‘Sexual attractiveness and overall physical condition aside, do women really think less of a man when they notice he's letting himself lop over his belt?’
    1. 1.1[with adverbial of direction]Move in a loping or slouching way.
      ‘he lopped towards the plane’
      • ‘The massive white tiger that had been laying on the ground nearby, asleep, was awake now, and lopped towards them, growling softly.’
      • ‘He lopped towards the passage barely making a sound.’
      • ‘The three lopped towards home, not speaking and adoring the imagined danger of summer rain.’

Origin

Late 16th century: probably symbolic of limpness; compare with lob.

Pronunciation:

lop

/lɒp/