Definition of look in English:

look

verb

  • 1[no object, usually with adverbial of direction] Direct one's gaze in a specified direction.

    ‘people were looking at him’
    ‘they looked up as he came into the room’
    • ‘I looked out of the window.’
    • ‘I looked nervously around to see if anyone was looking at me, then back up the path toward her.’
    • ‘Mitch looked over at her and smiled.’
    • ‘The man looked nervously in either direction, then down at his shirt.’
    • ‘To my credit, I looked through the peephole before I let him in.’
    • ‘I looked over a wall into a graveyard and found myself looking at the gravestone of one of Britain's finest women writers.’
    • ‘Peggy looks up from her book and asks James what he was doing at the time.’
    • ‘I've never seen men look in the mirror so much.’
    • ‘Brooke nudged him and looked pointedly in the direction of the man in the elevator with them.’
    • ‘He said he looked through the window to check that the victim was all right and saw her move.’
    • ‘He was looking at her but he looked away quickly when he realized he'd been caught.’
    • ‘Mother, too, paused in her work and looked questioningly over her shoulder.’
    • ‘Check first to see who the caller is by looking through a window or a door viewer.’
    • ‘The young boy looked at his watch and he started to run faster.’
    • ‘When it came to a standstill, I was holding tight onto the table and looking at another passenger, who was looking down at me.’
    • ‘I looked to my left, and a man was in the corner was looking at me over his shoulder with a big grin on his face.’
    • ‘I looked to my right and saw James looking at me with a small smile on his face.’
    • ‘Eventually the conversation breaks off, and the guy behind the counter looks up.’
    • ‘She looked away from the canopy to stare at Derek, who was looking at the picture.’
    • ‘She looks into my eyes and something passes over her face.’
    glance, gaze, stare, gape, peer, fix one's gaze, focus
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Ignore (someone) by pretending not to see them.
      ‘he glanced up once but looked right through me’
      • ‘I'm one of those people everyone looks through, like a window or a ghost or the air.’
      • ‘Donna looked through me and didn't take my offered hand.’
      • ‘Their parents didn't pay any attention at all and looked through the men just as the men looked through the children.’
      • ‘He seemed to be looking right through her.’
      • ‘They just looked straight through her, pretending not to see her.’
    2. 1.2dated [with object]Express (something) by one's gaze.
      ‘Poirot looked a question’
      • ‘Brenda and Larry looked a question at each other.’
      • ‘I thought of the gentle eyes which had once looked love at me.’
      • ‘Jones looked an enquiry at His Highness, who nodded assent.’
    3. 1.3[with object]Inspect something with a view to establishing its merits.
      ‘they looked over a property in Great Marlborough Street’
      • ‘Dad will first take the two tickets and look them over like a valuator inspecting diamonds.’
      • ‘A man will come in a van once a fortnight from Glasgow to look the place over.’
      • ‘She sat in the living room of her apartment looking over the file she had been given the day before.’
      • ‘We don't know for sure at this point, but the fact that the prosecutor took two weeks to evaluate the evidence, to look it over and consider it, indicates, I think, that there's more to it than just the young woman's story.’
      • ‘Police Chief William Bratton, in full uniform, sidearm strapped to his belt, walks past the intersection and looks the situation over.’
      • ‘Why don't you leave a copy of your book here and we will look it over and get back to you?’
      • ‘She looked it over, inspecting each inch.’
      • ‘I said, kind of apologetically, ‘Hi, I've bought this house, and we're here to look it over.’’
      • ‘I examined the ring, looking it over and wondering if ever it would grace his finger again.’
      • ‘E-mail me your work when you're done, and I'll look it over!’
      • ‘And we're going to look it over together here through the next couple of days.’
      • ‘They were ready to look the aircraft over.’
      • ‘I will look them over and see what I can come up with.’
      • ‘A few children found themselves in a kind of involuntary competition, when strangers would come to look the children over and leave with the lucky ones, while the numbers of those left unselected gradually dwindled.’
      • ‘One evening the old farmer decided to go down to the pond, as he hadn't been there for a while, and look it over.’
      • ‘I'm picking them up, much more deliberately, much more slowly, taking time to really look them over.’
      • ‘Then, have one of your English teachers at school look it over and give you some helpful tips.’
      • ‘I would assume that, when there is an error, people like you, people still in active service read the articles, get the information, and look it over closely.’
      • ‘When you're done arguing, I'll look your answers over and see if they are correct.’
      • ‘Now look those files over; I gotta check out the rest of the ship and then you'll be up and away.’
    4. 1.4Peruse (a book or other written material)
      ‘we looked through all the books and this was still the one we liked best’
      • ‘As a child he was often sick and so had plenty of time to learn to read and look through picture books.’
      • ‘I spent yesterday evening looking through people's diaries again.’
      • ‘Josie and his mum were sitting on the couch, looking through a book.’
      • ‘It is ten times faster and much easier than looking through a long list searching for a state and country.’
      • ‘I found a lot of information, so we can look through that and write the essay together.’
      • ‘I look through the book, and realize there's only one page with any writing on it.’
      • ‘Jessica sat on the couch in her own room, looking through the book and making notes in her notebook.’
      • ‘I looked through the book and in various places read uncomfortably familiar passages.’
      • ‘They look through files and check that things are where they are supposed to be.’
      • ‘Anyone who wanders into a bookshop or looks through a publisher's catalogue is bound to bump into a new Companion.’
      • ‘A quick look through her books will give the impression that they are about food - as indeed, in a sense, they are.’
      • ‘Once you have your style in mind, look through some cookbooks for a little inspiration.’
      • ‘She looked through her appointment book carefully for a few minutes.’
      • ‘Mitch was ignoring him, making a big show of looking through the papers on his desk.’
      • ‘I was going to look through the book in my lunch hour, but of course I didn't get one…’
      • ‘He asked for my license number, looked through his book, and found my car.’
      • ‘He cannot read or write, and spends his days in prison coloring and looking through comic books.’
      • ‘While looking through her papers, her family discovered she was one of the first to investigate the use of the drug Tamoxifen in cancer care.’
      • ‘With a sigh, he picked up his tattered spell book and started to look through it again.’
      • ‘So we got the car magazines, looked through Auto Trader, checked the various web sites, and pretty much got caught up in the idea.’
    5. 1.5Walk round (a place or building) in order to view any interesting features.
      ‘he spent the day looking round Edinburgh’
      • ‘He spent the morning looking around the market and said he was pleased that the weather had been dry.’
      • ‘I took a look around the drab training centre.’
      • ‘We spent the day with our friends looking round the lovely old buildings.’
      • ‘This weekend will be the last chance for visitors to look round the York Story museum before it closes on Sunday afternoon.’
      • ‘Visitors to Ilkley will be able to look round the council chamber and view a display showing its history.’
      • ‘I view the property, spending maybe ten minutes looking round the four rooms with the seller's mother.’
      • ‘And on June 29, ex-pupils and staff are invited to reunite to have a final look round the building.’
      • ‘There were some quaint streets to explore and various interesting shops to look round.’
    6. 1.6[with clause]Ascertain with a quick glance.
      ‘people finishing work don't look where they're going’
      • ‘He walked along the street without looking where he put his feet.’
      • ‘Mobile phone users are less likely to look whether the road is clear before crossing.’
      • ‘You really should look where you're going. I could have run you down.’
  • 2Regard in a specified way.

    ‘I look at tennis differently from some coaches’
    • ‘Should it ever snow again, sledging will have to be looked at in a different light.’
    • ‘The point of any literature is to make you think or to make you look at things in a different way.’
    • ‘The children had always regarded her as family, and as a result she looked on them as her own.’
    • ‘Desperate to escape her hometown for the bright lights, she looks on Heather as a stick-in-the-mud, as bad as her boyfriend.’
    • ‘People welcomed and looked on him as a friend regardless of the cause of his visit.’
    • ‘His involvement in the music business is really looked on as a pastime from his own point of view.’
    • ‘He looks at things from a very practical point of view.’
    • ‘Do you feel like you go out there and guys are looking at you a little differently now?’
    • ‘I can see already that he looks on Lesley as a bottom feeder.’
    regard, consider, think of, deem, judge, count, see, view, take, reckon, believe to be
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Examine (a matter) and consider what action to take.
      ‘a committee is looking at the financing of the BBC’
      • ‘We sat down and looked at different ways of raising money and this will be a popular one.’
      • ‘The fund is split by the court and the judge will look at the pension in the context of all assets.’
      • ‘We will start by looking at the new rules, and will then consider the old ones more briefly.’
      • ‘Policy making is one of the six areas of work being looked at under the Government review.’
      • ‘It's just a matter of looking at how your day is structured and finding a free slot.’
      • ‘It is the select committee that looks at an issue, rather than at the politics of an issue.’
      • ‘The survey also looked at some of the key issues in the enterprise software market.’
      • ‘It is also looking at ways to reduce staff levels as part of a financial review.’
      • ‘Each of the pilots looks at a different aspect of making it easier for small firms to support learning.’
      • ‘A date has not yet been set for the hearing and a judge is reported to be looking at the case.’
      • ‘Since this came to light we have looked at other matters with other police forces.’
      • ‘They said they had looked at different ways of fundraising and applying for grants.’
    2. 2.2Investigate.
      ‘the police looked into his business dealings’
      • ‘Investigators are looking into the incident but they are already treating it as suspicious.’
      • ‘The research, to be carried out over the next five years, looks into the impact of climate change on businesses and local authorities.’
      • ‘They should have been delivered leaflets via the Royal Mail and we are looking into why this has not happened.’
      • ‘They added they were looking into two earlier deaths to determine whether they were caused by the disease.’
      • ‘In the 1960s he set up a research team which looked into the problems of football hooliganism.’
      • ‘The film also looks into what may be the root of the racial tension that exists between these two groups today.’
      • ‘He has been forced to try and find a residential buyer for the property, while the parish council looks into alternatives for providing a post office.’
      • ‘West Yorkshire Police is looking into her claims after she made a complaint.’
      • ‘He said he was looking into the case and was in contact with the Home Office.’
      • ‘A section of the report looks into reopening Otley Railway Station.’
      • ‘A spokeswoman for the council said it was looking into the latest situation.’
      • ‘Police and fire investigators are looking into a spate of suspicious fires in Braintree.’
      • ‘Mr Bill Addison was looking into the question of grants, but none would be available before April.’
      • ‘A fire investigation officer at the scene said they are still looking into what caused the fire.’
      • ‘Police representatives confirmed that they would be looking into the problem.’
      • ‘Police are looking into the incident, but the dog is not expected to be put down.’
      • ‘The Government is looking into making second-home owners pay the full amount of council tax.’
      • ‘The documentary looks into the latest research, and demonstrates what vitamins do to the body when taken in supplement form.’
      • ‘The Herald contacted the company for a comment, but it was still looking into the problem as the paper went to press.’
      • ‘The inquiry will look into the catalogue of failings by police, health and social services.’
    3. 2.3Attempt to find.
      ‘Howard has been looking for you’
      • ‘They also want to speak to a stranger who appeared to be looking for her just four hours before she went missing.’
      • ‘When we were looking for girls for the band we didn't care what they looked like.’
      • ‘Here we are, wandering lost in the woods, looking for anything that looked like a path.’
      • ‘It looked like Mitchell was looking for a good place to stop and that was it.’
      • ‘She appeared to be looking for someone outside.’
      • ‘It looked like it was going to be one of those trips when we found everything but the grater I was looking for.’
      • ‘Cathy and Judy had gone off looking for plants that looked like they could be eaten.’
      • ‘When you are looking at each case individually, what are you looking for?’
      • ‘We causally walked through the rooms looking for anything that might help in our journey.’
      • ‘I was looking for some information about the history of the House of Commons.’
      • ‘Last time I borrowed one of her shoes she ripped apart my room looking for them.’
      • ‘When I got home I went around my room looking for a book I had to return to the Library.’
  • 3[with complement or adverbial] Have the appearance or give the impression of being.

    ‘mum looked unhappy’
    ‘the home looked like a prison’
    ‘a funny-looking bloke’
    • ‘In front of Cordelia was a building that looked way too old to belong in Los Angeles.’
    • ‘The design was also altered so that the buildings looked more traditional and conventional.’
    • ‘The flowers are lovely and they are sitting in vases, making our sitting room look beautiful.’
    • ‘Some of the older buildings are looking a little bit tired and we are hoping this project will give them a new lease of life.’
    • ‘It looks as if it's going to be a bumper year, looking at the amount of fruit on the boughs.’
    • ‘He looked alert, raising hopes he was making progress following the surgery.’
    • ‘Recently he has been looking rather grim.’
    • ‘I saw a few guys there looking confused like me.’
    • ‘He was tall and skinny, and looked way too young to be a policeman.’
    • ‘From the outside the building looked old, possibly one of the oldest in the town.’
    • ‘Susan has rounded up four official-looking people to be judges and the contest begins.’
    • ‘The blonde girl looked a bit confused, as did her friends.’
    • ‘Mainly constructed of wood, with two small swimming pools on both sides, the room looks spacious.’
    • ‘She looked at her friends who weren't even looking at her, they looked so ashamed.’
    • ‘For much of tonight's show she looks bored, unhappy and uncomfortable when singing.’
    • ‘Forcing herself to get up, she sat back on the edge of the table, hoping she looked calm.’
    • ‘Last week, she appeared in the papers looking shockingly gaunt, and it was reported she has been hitting the bottle again.’
    • ‘Sadly, the building looks a little neglected since the school moved out last year.’
    • ‘She looked so happy that he thought he could just stand there, looking at her forever.’
    • ‘While the school building looks intact, the floors are damaged and many windows are broken and will need to be replaced.’
    resemble, bear a resemblance to, look similar to, have a look of, have the appearance of, remind one of, put one in mind of, make one think of, be the image of, echo, have the hallmarks of, have all the hallmarks of, simulate
    take after
    be the spitting image of, be the spit of, be a dead ringer for, favour
    seem, seem to be, appear, appear to be, have the air of being, have the appearance of being, give the impression of being, give every appearance of being, give every indication of being, look to be, present as being, strike someone as being
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1informal Show a likelihood of.
      [with present participle] ‘Leeds didn't look like scoring from any of their corners’
      [with clause] ‘it doesn't look like you'll be moving to Liverpool’
      • ‘With the game being played in the middle of the field neither team were looking like scoring.’
      • ‘It looks like there might be a battle.’
      • ‘Britain was the last to join the Airbus party, and now it looks like it will be the first to leave.’
      • ‘It looks like the spike is finally over and a kind of normality seems to have returned.’
      • ‘It looks like they may have to start from scratch and it could set the opening back more than a year.’
      • ‘He has that knack of playing well every game and always looks like scoring a goal if not two.’
      • ‘The high winds arrived late in the evening and it looks like being a stormy night.’
      • ‘It looks like Sir Seton Wills has come to our aid yet again and for that we must be grateful.’
      • ‘We look like we can score at any time now and we are looking dangerous from both set pieces and open play.’
      • ‘I like peace and quiet, but it looks like I will have to live in a big city to find them.’
      • ‘It looks like the turnout for today's General Election is going to be up on the last one.’
      • ‘Although they had the best of position, it only ever looked like one team would score.’
      • ‘Finally, she runs out of words and it looks like it is now my turn to practice my vocabulary.’
      • ‘It looks like motorcycle bandits might attack if you are on a moped on the island.’
      • ‘The club was opened by the Conservatives and it looks like Labour are going to close it.’
      • ‘I think of myself as one of those guys that every time they putt, it looks like it might go in.’
      • ‘As with most great money saving ideas, it looks like it could end up costing more in the long run.’
      • ‘I had a really busy week this week, and it looks like things might only get more hectic.’
      • ‘On the basis that they have to be right one day, it looks like they're right this time.’
      • ‘In the second half it looked like we were going to score all most every time we got the ball.’
    2. 3.2Appear one's normal, healthy self.
      ‘he just didn't look himself at all’
      • ‘They haven't looked themselves for a little while now.’
      • ‘As predicted, form went out the window in this game, in which the stylish Slovaks never looked themselves against their Czech neighbours.’
      • ‘There have been instances when the opposition just didn't look themselves.’
      • ‘The horse did not look himself before the race, and in retrospect he should not have taken part.’
      • ‘He hasn't looked himself since he had to give up his day job at the High Court.’
  • 4Rely on (someone) to do or provide something.

    ‘she will look to you for help’
    • ‘When things do go wrong, all passengers rely on them and look to them for guidance.’
    • ‘Selling beautiful handmade jewellery which looks to Japan and North Africa for its inspiration, the internationally known designer creates everything herself.’
    • ‘It is about the dispossessed who look to us to provide quality public services.’
    • ‘He looks to St Lucia's natural beauty for inspiration for his colourful acrylic paintings.’
    • ‘However, one look at our eager students reminds us they rely on and look to us for leadership, guidance and motivation.’
    • ‘Scotland often looks to Ireland as a benchmark but the popularity of their provinces is a relatively recent phenomenon notwithstanding the odd day of glory against the All Blacks.’
    • ‘A troubled and afflicted mankind looks to us, pleading for us to keep our rendez-vous with destiny.’
    • ‘The public looks to them for unbiased information.’
    • ‘At a time when the world looks to India for leadership, we should draw upon our rich resources of tradition, heritage and culture, in order to shape a better world.’
    • ‘Since the Defendants are looking to Lloyd's to provide coverage for the claims made, it is necessary to examine the statement of claim.’
    • ‘Danielsen looks to Eastern Europe and Asia for inspiration, championing films that have no British distribution prospects and may never be seen here again.’
    • ‘We are by far the most powerful nation on earth, and the world looks to us for leadership on this issue.’
    • ‘Mongolia's new Prime Minister looks to New Zealand for political advice.’
    • ‘Mrs Jacobs has lived in Australia for 30 years, but still looks to Lancashire for inspiration and storylines.’
    • ‘I have looked to you for assistance and guidance and you have provided both.’
    • ‘In an emergency the mother looks to you for confidence - that's a key thing we try to teach junior midwives.’
    • ‘The student looks to Bill Murray for help, and they both end up battling for the girl.’
    turn to, resort to, have recourse to, fall back on, avail oneself of, make use of
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1[with infinitive]Hope or expect to do something.
      ‘universities are looking to expand their intakes’
      • ‘At one stage last year the company was looking to expand and buy the other hangar.’
      • ‘The world is awash with money as everyone looks to make a decent return at a time of low interest rates and low inflation.’
      • ‘The church is looking to secure grants to proceed further with the redevelopment.’
      • ‘Mr Ellis had set up a training consultancy in Bath and the couple were looking to move out of London.’
      • ‘As the trek is in November, she is now looking to raise as much extra money as possible for the charity.’
      • ‘Kerry and John are now looking to buy a family home and Kerry is hoping to start driving lessons.’
      • ‘The report urges caution in the siting of the masts and that is all we are looking to achieve.’
      • ‘Now the firm is looking to cash in on its success with a major marketing push.’
      • ‘This is absolutely vital to the Club as it looks to expand facilities at Balla Town Park.’
      • ‘A nursery is looking to expand to keep on children who have grown too old for it.’
      • ‘A spokesman for the company said it is looking to hold an open public meeting as soon as possible.’
      • ‘If we carry on with the same attitude and commitment we will be looking to pick up more points tomorrow.’
      • ‘We are looking to expand into the market and move beyond our core competency of racing games.’
      • ‘The team will be looking to improve a poor home record of one win in six games.’
      • ‘Thompson was set to give reserve team debuts to three more players as he looks to strengthen his squad.’
      • ‘He fans to be patient as he looks to get his career back on track.’
    2. 4.2archaic [with clause]Take care; make sure.
      ‘Look ye obey the masters of the craft’
      • ‘Look that you behave well to him.’
  • 5(of a building or room) have an outlook in a specified direction.

    ‘the room looks out over Mylor Harbour’
    • ‘Bedroom 4 is the most peaceful room in the Inn with French doors looking out on the garden courtyard and fountain.’
    • ‘More elaborate fare is on offer back up the path at Hotel la Portilla, where the restaurant looks out over the sea.’
    • ‘Eventually I will live in the country with a vegetable patch and a studio that looks out into the bush.’
    • ‘His office looks out over the busy metropolis.’
    • ‘It looks out over The Harbour, the Botanic Gardens and the symbolic, serrated sails of The Opera House.’
    • ‘He has built an office with a glass wall that looks out over the main staircase.’
    • ‘Double rooms look over Rocky Bay with views to the ocean.’
    • ‘My apartment looks out to the New Jersey turnpike and Silver Lake Park.’
    • ‘There is a conservatory that looks out on to a large walled garden.’
    • ‘Bedroom 5, which is currently used as a study, has a window looking out over open countryside to woodlands in the distance.’
    • ‘No other restaurant in New Jersey looks out over such a commanding view.’
    • ‘The restaurant had a dining room that looked over the bay.’
    • ‘A small balcony looks out over the village.’
    • ‘Your hotel room not only looks out over the African bush but it also has a sea view!’
    • ‘The sleek living room looks out on to a beautiful garden with mature trees, wisteria and a decked outdoor dining area.’
    • ‘The real gem is the large terrace that looks out onto the park behind the hotel.’
    • ‘It has a long meeting table and a smaller desk in the corner under a window, which looks out over the rooftops at the back of the station.’
    • ‘Solomon's office measures 15 feet square and looks out over a tree-lined road and a small park.’
    • ‘The building's glass walls allow natural light to flood the studio, which looks out on to the famous playing fields.’
    • ‘The rear of the house looks out over a valley of fields, woods and a river.’
    command a view, face, overlook, front
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1An act of directing one's gaze in order to see someone or something.

    ‘let me get a closer look’
    • ‘One look in the mirror, two days later, and I was horrified.’
    • ‘Pull over to the side of the road for a closer look, and you will find these seals amiable enough to photograph.’
    • ‘Every now and then someone would appear, but most of them didn't want books, they wanted a photograph or a closer look.’
    • ‘And then something happens and you stop and look, the look becomes a gaze, the gaze a stare.’
    • ‘Tom had brought his patrol vehicle so the children could have a closer look.’
    • ‘There must be scores of former tenants who would welcome a look inside before modernisation.’
    • ‘He laughed at the looks directed his way for the teasing, then went upstairs.’
    • ‘He knelt down beside one of the bodies to take a closer look, and looked back up with a furrowed brow.’
    • ‘That didn't stop her from sneaking looks at both Sam and Rosie as she pretended to be studying the menu.’
    • ‘So this morning I took my binoculars into the garden to try and get a closer look.’
    • ‘He seemed on edge and nervous, returning her looks with reassuring gazes that were none too convincing.’
    • ‘On the way back they'd spotted a car on a forecourt so we all had to trundle back over there for a closer look.’
    • ‘Perhaps you would like a closer look?’
    • ‘During the day, if they wish, they can have a closer look behind the stage on one of the regular tours that take place.’
    • ‘Security personnel had to struggle a bit to restrain those who wanted to surge forward and have a closer look.’
    • ‘If the plants generally look good to you, pick up a few likely specimens and have a closer look.’
    • ‘I thought that the hem on my skirt was looking a bit frayed and decided to take a closer look.’
    • ‘We went and had a look - it appeared to be very old, but the safety pin was out so that in the interests of safety we had to cordon off the Square.’
    • ‘He cast a quick look over his shoulder.’
    • ‘I had a look in the mirror earlier, and, although you might not believe this, I was even whiter than usual.’
    glance, observation, view, examination, study, inspection, scan, survey, sight, peep, peek, glimpse, gaze, stare, gape, ogle
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1An expression of a feeling or thought by looking.
      ‘the orderly gave me a funny look’
      • ‘Another moan of terror brings him out of his reverie and he casts a worried look in her direction.’
      • ‘He cast a dirty look over his shoulder, then stopped by us.’
      • ‘Anxious looks gave way to expressions of relief and then to quiet smiles of confidence.’
      • ‘Jay nods and I see that his joking expression has been replaced with a look of sympathy.’
      • ‘After taking a step back from him, she noticed the puzzled look crossing his face.’
      • ‘Sam's eyes were on her, a look of confusion on his face.’
      • ‘The cynical, bored and disinterested looks on the faces of the athletes should have sent a big message.’
      • ‘The two teenagers wore worried looks upon their faces.’
      • ‘The pleading, concerned look in his eyes overwhelmed me.’
      • ‘He saw his mother's look of disapproval, but chose to ignore it.’
      • ‘I was greeted by my father's look of confusion as I finished my task.’
      • ‘She looked at Misha a little closer, and a look of pure fear crossed her face.’
      • ‘Her parents both gave her stern questioning looks.’
      • ‘Instead her sympathetic looks were directed towards his back.’
      • ‘Stefan couldn't help but notice my look of disgust.’
      • ‘Getting a laptop out on the top deck of a bus gets you some funny looks.’
      • ‘To see him with such a pained worried look in his eyes; my heart gave a light twinge.’
      • ‘Nicola and Caden exchanged worried looks before meeting her gaze, still not believing her.’
      • ‘I looked up to the transmitter controller who had a look of complete disbelief.’
      • ‘I glanced at Julia to exchange a look of disgust and found a strange expression on her face.’
    2. 1.2A scrutiny or examination.
      ‘the government should take a look at the amount of grant the council receives’
      • ‘They then ask the reader to take a closer look, reflecting the in-depth analysis in the articles.’
      • ‘Tomorrow we will take a quick look at the exam before doing a last review of the work.’
      • ‘The many parents that called to have a look and investigate places for their children enjoyed the visit.’
      • ‘It is time the experts are called in to take a look and suggest measures.’
      • ‘The Healthcare Commission should also reserve the right to take a closer look, randomly as well as responsively.’
      • ‘Its originality makes it worth a look; its brilliant cast and perfect soundtrack ensure this is a film not to miss.’
      • ‘The professions that we idealize and aspire towards deserve a closer look as well.’
      • ‘This is one of the most interesting and unusual chapters in the history of town twinning and therefore deserves a closer look.’
      • ‘While attendance may seem decent at first glance, a closer look reveals very few students.’
  • 2The appearance of someone or something, especially as expressing a particular quality.

    ‘the bedraggled look of the village’
    • ‘These kitchen accessories will add a modern look to any kitchen.’
    • ‘The building has been given a new look with two brightly coloured murals.’
    • ‘So when lawn edges become overgrown and tatty, it can have an adverse effect on the look of the whole garden.’
    • ‘She worked closely with athletes to ensure that the look of a garment never hindered its performance.’
    • ‘Coral, blue, brick red and yellow combine to lend a rustic look to versatile garments.’
    • ‘There have been great reviews about the quality, the look and usability of our site.’
    • ‘They are allowed to go in for the rustic look, like rope effect seats.’
    • ‘When the lighting is finally in place it will make a huge improvement to the look of the village.’
    • ‘It's possibly the most accurate adaptation of a comic you'll get, in terms of the visual look and the narrative style.’
    • ‘It has a bit of an old-fashioned look compared to some of its more dynamic rivals though, and this makes it harder to use in places.’
    • ‘Headteacher Nick Capstick will be examining the new look later today.’
    • ‘Hand-made, their creations manage to retain the natural look, texture and colour.’
    • ‘Mr. Scanlon is planning extensive renovations to give the premises a modern look.’
    • ‘The seats are supremely comfortable, and the cabin has a real quality look and feel to it.’
    • ‘Angry householders have claimed the historic look of their community is being ruined by the removal of cobblestones.’
    • ‘Currently I am testing out a new look for the blog which seems to be an improvement on the default template.’
    • ‘The game has been designed for family viewing and has the look of an animated film.’
    • ‘And yes, in spite of their glowering looks and fierce demeanor, owls can be endearing.’
    • ‘These vintage cars and motorcycles have retained their good looks and grace, though long past their prime.’
    • ‘The even better news is that bathroom accessories can be spray painted in the same colour for a co-ordinated look.’
    appearance, air, aspect, bearing, cast, manner, mien, demeanour, features, semblance, guise, facade, impression, effect
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1A person's facial appearance considered aesthetically.
      ‘he had charm, good looks, and an amusing insouciance’
      • ‘With her PhD in animal behaviour, natural good looks and easy way with a camera, she's a natural.’
      • ‘Disliking one's looks appears to be more of a risk factor for boys than for girls.’
      • ‘Talent and good looks rarely go hand in hand, and often when they do, it's the talent which gets elbowed into the background.’
      • ‘The eating disorder transformed the schoolgirl with model looks into a wasted figure and she began to suffer bone disease and kidney failure.’
      • ‘He shows her as a politician who relied too much on her looks to get what she wants.’
      • ‘Although they're practically perfect for the roles in terms of looks and demeanor, they bring nothing to the film.’
      • ‘He is more famous in some quarters for his looks and fashion style than for his political programme.’
      • ‘Lucy was perfect, blonde hair, not a hair out of place, tall, model looks and a friendly expression.’
      • ‘Becky, working as a governess, resorts to her good looks and alluring personality to move up in society.’
      • ‘It's commonly said that you are what you eat, and it might also be true that your looks are a direct reflection of your diet.’
      • ‘He envied his good looks, his talent, and the amount of attention he got.’
      • ‘With his blue-eyed gaze and daredevil looks, she knew this man was a force to be reckoned with.’
      • ‘Indeed given their looks, wealth and position, it is almost remarkable that none of them ever went through a wild or rebellious phase.’
      • ‘It was only after Eva started entering beauty contests that people began to notice her good looks.’
      • ‘None of the guys that I had kissed before could compare in that department, nor could they compare in looks.’
      • ‘With his dark curly hair and atypical looks, he was cast as Shakespeare's Richard III.’
      • ‘What he lacks in terms of looks, he more than makes up for with charisma.’
      • ‘He has the dark good looks necessary for heart-throb status but a question mark has always hung over his talent.’
      • ‘He used his looks to dazzle girls and was seeing up to four young women at one time.’
      • ‘While admired for her looks and style, the empress never enjoyed the same degree of popularity as her husband.’
    2. 2.2A style or fashion.
      ‘Italian designers unveiled their latest look’
      • ‘The new trend for a 1950s look is creeping in, accompanied by fuller skirts and wide belts.’
      • ‘She looked good in her black trousers, but it was a casual rather than a fashionable look.’
      • ‘No fashion look becomes a trend, of course, unless it is widely adopted.’
      • ‘At the month's end there was much excitement as I unveiled my new look to the world.’
      • ‘However, Kennelly says those who want to just flirt with the trend can get the look without having to splash much cash.’
      • ‘It's a look most women over 35 would think twice about and then discard.’
      • ‘Here, we've put together three stylish casual looks to illustrate the kinds of clothes on offer.’
      • ‘This season, the unadorned look is more in vogue than ever in France.’
      • ‘This season's hottest fashion look is judged incomplete without a trio of large, colourful brooches.’
      • ‘Unlike mohair and go-go boots, some fashion looks never go out of style or out of season.’
      • ‘Their job is to translate these trends into a look which is up-to-the-minute, yet wearable and affordable.’
      • ‘The cut is also beautiful, and the look fashionable yet sophisticated.’
      • ‘The March editions of Esquire, GQ and Arena are usually the fashion issues devoted to the new season's looks and trends.’
      • ‘You can experiment with trying on clothes, not to buy them, but to explore unlikely styles and looks.’
      • ‘Check out these summer looks from the Replay fashion book I picked up in Barcelona.’
      • ‘Classic monochrome style proved the look of the day, as racegoers rose to the challenge of the weather.’
      • ‘Tina keeps up to date with trends in nail art and promises she can do any look a customer might see in a magazine.’
      • ‘If these looks stay in fashion for the rest of my life I will never go out of fashion.’
      • ‘It's also worth considering the kaftan, one of the most flattering looks to emerge from gypsy chic.’

exclamation

  • Used to call attention to what one is going to say.

    ‘‘Look, this is ridiculous.’’
    • ‘I was actually on the verge of saying to him: look, just forget it, what is it going to prove?’
    • ‘Now, look here, I'm serious about that.’
    • ‘‘Oh and look, here's me and my friend Amy,’ Sarah said laughing at two girls in cheerleading uniforms.’
    • ‘Hey look here, loving my part time job doesn't mean I am proud of it.’
    • ‘‘Now look here Bee - you can't sing - all you are doing is making a buzzing noise’.’
    • ‘I'm pretty sure I heard the Chairman begin to say ‘Now look here…’’
    • ‘But look here, this rail is so ground down that there's only a narrow gap.’
    • ‘It was as if he were saying to me: look, we are hitting a ball over the net and this is a pretty damn good way to make a living.’
    • ‘It may well be, but look here - if you don't like something, then don't do it.’
    • ‘Now look here… we haven't known each other for twenty-four hours, and you want me to be your princess bride?’
    • ‘Had I been in an old comedy film, I would have said something like ‘now look here!’’
    • ‘Look here, John, you and I know this country likes to see decisiveness.’
    • ‘So I look Richards in the eye, and say ‘Now look here, you're not together, man.’’

Phrases

  • look one's age

    • Appear to be as old as one really is.

      ‘she knew she didn't look her age’
      • ‘He admits that for the first time in his life he is looking his age, and that he finds this rather galling.’
      • ‘He said: ‘All of the teenagers used in the test looked their age.’’
      • ‘Maybe older guys wouldn't be leering at the girls all the time if the girls actually looked their age.’
      • ‘In a film dealing with our obsession with youth and beauty, it's refreshing to see an actress who actually looks her age.’
      • ‘I'm coming to the conclusion I don't look my age, and I don't act my age.’
      • ‘She gained some weight, incidentally, and looks her age now.’
      • ‘He appeared drawn, his hair grayed, finally looking his age, she was delighted to see.’
      • ‘For the first time in years she thought he looked his age.’
      • ‘I am blessed with good genes, none of my family look their age.’
      • ‘He doesn't look his age and says that he feels and has the outlook of a younger man.’
  • look before you leap

    • proverb You shouldn't act without first considering the possible consequences or dangers.

      • ‘Instead, your friends and I usually waste breath exhorting you to exercise some restraint and look before you leap.’
      • ‘The decision on where you base yourself needs to be carefully considered, taking into account costs, competition and access - as is the case every step of the way, look before you leap!’
      • ‘Obviously it helps to know the background before you jump into the middle of a season, so look before you leap.’
      • ‘Dad… didn't anyone ever tell you to look before you leap?’
      • ‘Better to go slowly, they say, and look before you leap.’
      • ‘The rationale was the same that has guided Carter in much of his post-presidential career: look before you leap.’
      • ‘Moral of the story is, next time look before you leap.’
      • ‘As Simon noted, of course ‘you should look before you leap,’ but it is also true that ‘he who hesitates is lost.’’
      • ‘Someone didn't realise that you must look before you leap.’
      • ‘They may help you reach a decision - but look before you leap.’
      be on your guard, watch out, look out, mind out, be wary, be careful, be cautious, be on the lookout, be on the alert, keep your eyes open, keep a sharp lookout, be on the qui vive
      View synonyms
  • look daggers at

  • look down one's nose at

  • look for trouble

    • informal Behave in a way that is likely to provoke an argument or fight.

      ‘youths take a cocktail of drink and drugs before going out to look for trouble’
      • ‘He said: ‘She did not go out that evening looking for trouble.’’
      • ‘I've heard of traffic cops pulling kids over just because they were dressed like punks and ‘looked like they were looking for trouble.’’
      • ‘Meanwhile, no one stops to ask what happens to Billy Elliot's schoolmates, who are still hanging around outside the chippy of a winter evening looking for trouble instead of jobs.’
      • ‘Scarlet loves fighting and is always looking for trouble… some say that he dresses in red so that nobody will notice the blood stains on his clothes…’
      • ‘The victim was not looking for trouble and got drawn into a situation because he was trying to calm people down.’
      • ‘Overall everyone was on good behaviour and if someone was looking for trouble, it was obvious that we had the manpower to deal with it.’
      • ‘I don't know if they were drunk or just looking for trouble, but some were carrying beer and they started whistling at the girls.’
      • ‘So foxes have an undeserved reputation for aggressive behaviour - they do not look for trouble, they do not pick a fight.’
      • ‘There are madly intoxicated thugs coming onto streets in the small hours apparently looking for trouble and even to make eye contact with them is to invite confrontation of a violent kind.’
      • ‘You were looking for a fight and you were looking for trouble.’
  • look someone in the eye (or face)

    • Look directly at someone without showing embarrassment, fear, or shame.

      ‘I felt confident enough to look him straight in the eye’
      • ‘I see no reason why viewers should not enjoy a scholar simply looking them in the eye and talking straight.’
      • ‘I like somebody that looks me in the eye when I ask a question.’
      • ‘If Lydia ever thought you knew, she'd be too embarrassed to ever look you in the face again.’
      • ‘She didn't look him in the eye for fear of how he would answer.’
      • ‘Maybe he would have the best policies, but I could never support any politician who can't look me in the eye and give a straight answer to a question.’
      • ‘‘It's not over yet,’ she murmured, still not brave enough to look me in the face.’
      • ‘I was too embarrassed to look Alex in the face.’
      • ‘At least I could look him in the eye and tell him straight out that he can't hurt me anymore.’
      • ‘But they never looked me in the eye or addressed me directly.’
      • ‘David has trouble looking you in the eye, has a stutter and hasn't yet got the hang of speaking on the phone.’
  • look lively (or datedalive)

    • informal [usually in imperative]Move more quickly and energetically.

      ‘‘Look lively, lads, keep in step,’ Charlie shouted’
      • ‘Look lively, you two. I'm opening the airlock.’
      • ‘Come on, look lively! Give me the keys!’
      • ‘Come on, team! Look lively!’
      • ‘‘Well then look alive,’ Nickel said picking up his two-way radio.’
      • ‘Look lively gentlemen, here comes part of the welcoming committee.’
      hurry, hurry up, hurry it up, get a move on, come along, look lively, speed up, move faster
      View synonyms
  • look the other way

    • Deliberately ignore wrongdoing by others.

      ‘the authorities simply seem content to look the other way’
      • ‘A police chief and a captain are accused of looking the other way when female police department employees were sexually harassed.’
      • ‘Will anyone stand up against an employer that discriminates against women or do we just look the other way?’
      • ‘As long as her second husband kept his trysts private and emotionally uninvolving, she was willing to look the other way.’
      • ‘We have looked the other way for too long.’
      • ‘He will surround himself with those who look the other way or actually encourage his philandering behavior.’
      ignore, take no notice of, take no account of, pay no attention to, pay no heed to, refuse to acknowledge
      View synonyms
  • look sharp

    • Be quick.

      ‘well, look sharp then, or else you'll keep Jos waiting’
      • ‘Look sharp, all of ye! There are whales hereabouts!’
      • ‘‘Look sharp everyone!’ He said. ‘Here he comes.’’
      • ‘Look sharp. The tide is coming in!’
      • ‘Look sharp, we've got some incoming cruise missiles.’
      • ‘Come on - look sharp and put your microphones on.’
  • look small

  • look to the future

    • Consider and plan for what is in the future, rather than worrying about the past or present.

      ‘the making of forecasts forces managers to think ahead, to look to the future’
      • ‘She said the break would give the family a chance to forget about past worries and look to the future.’
      • ‘They feel that entirely too many meetings are steeped in the past and present, rather than looking to the future.’
      • ‘The essence of New Year celebrations is renewal - putting the past behind and looking to the future.’
      • ‘The most important thing is to live in the present and look to the future, not always back at the past.’
      • ‘More to the point, he'd lost his interest in life, preferring to dwell on the past rather than look to the future.’
  • look someone up and down

    • Scrutinize someone carefully.

      ‘Fen looked her up and down consideringly before answering’
      • ‘He looked me up and down, his gaze stopping when it reached my eyes.’
      • ‘She stared at me, looked me up and down and sneered.’
      • ‘Seth looked me up and down, as if checking me for signs of damage.’
      • ‘He looked me up and down. ‘You have something to say?’’
      • ‘The man looked her up and down as though checking her condition.’
      • ‘‘Oh,’ he said in a dismissive tone, looking me up and down.’
      • ‘The woman serving looked me up and down, then asked for ID.’
      • ‘The lady of the house opened the door, looked me up and down and started giggling.’
      • ‘One of the gang members looked Jones up and down as he walked over.’
      • ‘The bouncer stopped me, looked me up and down, frowned slightly and said, ‘Are you on the guest-list, sir?’’
      study, examine, scrutinize, inspect, survey, search, scour, sweep, rake
      View synonyms

Phrasal Verbs

  • look after

    • Take care of.

      ‘women who stay at home to look after children’
      • ‘He had told police colleagues he could not attend because he was looking after a sick relative.’
      • ‘There are about 60,000 children and young people who are looked after by local authorities in England.’
      • ‘We care for and look after all our customers especially the elderly and disabled.’
      • ‘A society is judged by how it looks after the people who are most vulnerable.’
      • ‘Henrietta looks after her horses with tender loving care and knows how to do a good training job.’
      • ‘Patients will be treated on a day care basis and be looked after by a team of specialist eye nurses.’
      • ‘As parents, we often spend all our time looking after everyone else in the family and forget about ourselves.’
      • ‘She also looked after and nursed her mother for many years up to the time of her death.’
      • ‘My wife, Tracy, is a part-time student and she looks after William, our three-year-old.’
      • ‘He works hard all day and then he looks after his children at night.’
      take care of, care for, attend to, tend, mind, minister to, take charge of, supervise, protect, guard
      keep an eye on, keep safe, be responsible for
      watch, sit with, nurse, babysit, childmind
      View synonyms
  • look back

    • [with negative]Suffer a setback or interrupted progress.

      ‘she launched her own company in 1981 and has never looked back’
      • ‘When I moved down to London I sold my car like a shot, and I've not looked back since.’
      • ‘A few months later he won his first national title in the 400 meter free, and he hasn't looked back since.’
      • ‘Soon electronic engineering became a thing of the past for Richard and he's never looked back.’
      • ‘With the help and encouragement of friends, we started to farm - and never looked back.’
      • ‘I bought 300 books from a collector $3,500 in 1976, and I've never looked back.’
  • look back at/on

    • Think of (past events)

      ‘don't waste time looking back on things which have caused you distress’
      • ‘Those of us with long political memories tend to look back at events of the past and expect history to repeat itself.’
      • ‘How can anyone, looking back at the past four years, possibly approve?’
      • ‘We can look back at events through history and determine exactly how they came about.’
      • ‘Rev Ashworth has spent the past 22 years at St Margaret's, in St Margaret's Road, a time which he looks back on with fondness.’
      • ‘He afforded himself a little smile as he looked back on how his company has grown.’
      • ‘It is also a time for reflection, looking back on the year we have just had and forward to what will be.’
      • ‘When you look back on past romances, do you ever wonder what you saw in a former lover?’
      • ‘Have you ever looked back at the past and wished that things would go back to how they were, though you knew they never could?’
      • ‘I've really made a mess of things, I reflected, looking back on the day's events.’
      • ‘I think looking back on your past experiences and failures is useful only if you learn from this experience and ensure that you do not make the same mistake again.’
      reflect on, think about, remember, recall, bring to mind, muse on, brood on, ponder on, reminisce about, be nostalgic about, hark back to
      View synonyms
  • look down on

    • Regard (someone) with a feeling of superiority.

      ‘my mother had social pretensions and looked down on most of our neighbours’
      • ‘Don't consider me some well-off snob who looks down on all you bus riders because I do not.’
      • ‘A woman smoking on the street would be looked down on.’
      • ‘She had never felt so disliked and looked down on before in her life.’
      • ‘Since the seventh grade I have been looked down on for something that I cannot change.’
      • ‘If you don't make good money you are a loser and may be looked down on, no matter how civilized and ethical you are.’
      • ‘He despised his father for looking down on his mother and for neglecting Lynn.’
      • ‘Why is it that parents are looked down on if they put their child in daycare, but stay at home moms also get looked down on?’
      • ‘Who now remembers when clothes catalogues were looked down on as merely a way of buying basic items by instalment?’
      • ‘Melanie does everything wrong and everyone looks down on her, even the doormen in her building.’
      • ‘Serving someone was looked down on, and the art of gracious service got lost.’
      disdain, scorn, hold in disdain, regard with contempt, treat with contempt, sneer at, spurn, shun, disparage, pooh-pooh, despise
      look down one's nose at, turn up one's nose at
      View synonyms
  • look forward to

    • Await eagerly.

      ‘we look forward to seeing you’
      • ‘How is it that things one looks forward to for so long are over so quickly?’
      • ‘We can now look forward to the final and hope that the lads can keep up the momentum.’
      • ‘He ripped out his old kitchen, took it to the tip and looked forward to quickly installing the new units.’
      • ‘After all, they have the birth of their baby to look forward to in four months' time.’
      • ‘He is overjoyed and finds all the people are happy to see him, and he looks forward to the life that awaits him.’
      • ‘The club is something they look forward to, where they can meet friends on a regular basis.’
      • ‘The annual musical is the highlight of the year and is looked forward to by music lovers all over the county.’
      • ‘It promises to be a great occasion for the local community and is eagerly looked forward to.’
      • ‘What I looked forward to most was waiting for the train to make one of its weekly trips into town.’
      • ‘The carnival parade on Sunday afternoon is something everyone looks forward to.’
      await with pleasure, anticipate, wait for, be unable to wait for, count the days until, long for, hope for
      lick one's lips over
      anticipate, expect, await, count on, reckon on, watch for, hope for, look forward to, contemplate, prepare for, envisage
      View synonyms
  • look in

    • Make a short visit or call.

      ‘I will look in on you tomorrow’
      • ‘Would anyone think to look in on an old man who lived by himself?’
      • ‘She would ask one of their retired neighbors on the street, a woman, to look in on him every hour or so, if he wanted.’
      • ‘On the way back I looked in on Monreale cathedral.’
      • ‘I'm sure he looks in every once in a while to check up on what we've all been saying.’
      • ‘I want to look in on my friend and see how she's doing.’
      visit, call, call in, call round, pay a call, pay a visit, look in, stop by, drop by, drop in, drop over, drop round, come over
      View synonyms
  • look on

    • Watch without getting involved.

      ‘Cameron was looking on and making no move to help’
      • ‘There are young tigers frolicking in and out of the pools provided for them in their pens, and it's a pleasure to watch them and their mums looking on from next door.’
      • ‘He positioned himself on the couch watching the documentary with glee with Jocelyn looking on with displeasure.’
      • ‘He watches the young man select one of the animals and looks on amused as the young man stuffs it into the boot of his car.’
      • ‘The coach looked on, inscrutable as he always is when watching from the stands.’
      • ‘He looked on and watched as the same girl in his dream climbed into his room through the window.’
      • ‘That's why it matters if we simply look on as the dignity of one of our number is traded.’
  • look out

    • [usually in imperative]Be vigilant and take notice.

      ‘‘Look out!’ warned Billie, seeing a movement from the room beyond’
      • ‘I just hope they will take notice of warning signs we have put up and look out for them on the roads.’
      • ‘‘Look out!’ I yelled, diving toward Scott.’
      • ‘Look out for signs of disease.’
      • ‘‘Look out! Look out!’ they cried to their fellow crew members.’
      • ‘As she lived and worked in the rainforest of Ecuador, she had to look out for poisonous snakes, insects and plants.’
      beware, watch out, be on guard, be on one's guard, be alert, be wary, be vigilant, be careful, be cautious, pay attention, take heed, heed, keep one's eyes open, keep one's eyes peeled, keep one's eyes skinned, keep an eye out, be on the qui vive
      View synonyms
  • look something out

    • Search for and produce something.

      ‘I've got a catalogue somewhere and I'll look it out if you're interested’
      • ‘He said he thought he had a colour photograph of the sinking ship and he promised to look it out for me.’
      • ‘As I was asking the assistant to look them out in my size the manager of the store emerged from the back room.’
      • ‘If you had alerted me to the application, I would have looked it out.’
      • ‘Twenty years after falling in love with this record I looked it out for George to hear and, like me, he loved it.’
      • ‘It was one of the finest albums of the early 1990s - I must look it out and play it again.’
  • look up

    • (of a situation) improve.

      ‘things seemed to be looking up at last’
      • ‘Forecasters say things could be looking up for local residents.’
      • ‘So things are looking up these days, really.’
      • ‘When events in life take a turn for the better, we say that things are looking up.’
      • ‘With an increase in the number of heavy metal record labels things are looking up.’
      • ‘I think things are looking up now, so fingers crossed there should be more posts.’
      • ‘They followed this up with a draw against Down and a win over Louth and things were looking up.’
      • ‘Business is looking up.’
      • ‘In terms of pace, mind you, things are at long last looking up for Scotland, even behind the scrum.’
      • ‘To be fair, things had been looking up on the children's story front before Dahl arrived.’
      • ‘He'd just got a new flat and a girlfriend and things were really looking up.’
      improve, show improvement, get better, pick up, advance, develop, come along, come on, progress, make progress, make headway, shape up, perk up, rally, take a turn for the better
      View synonyms
  • look someone up

    • Make social contact with someone.

      ‘he would look her up when he was in the area’
      • ‘If you're in Berlin, promise to look us up.’
      • ‘We have got a young chef just starting college and Anthony gave him his number and asked him to look him up if he was in the area, which made his day.’
      • ‘Sometimes, an Italian friend on a visit to London would look him up.’
      • ‘We emailed for a bit too but are now out of contact - I should probably look her up again some time.’
      • ‘Man, I seriously need to look you up when I come visit my parents in Spring.’
      • ‘I said I was an old friend and I'd come to visit York and wanted to look him up.’
      • ‘I'd lost touch with him, and was meaning to look him up.’
      • ‘If you are every going through central Kentucky look me up.’
      • ‘Do look us up again when you are in America - perhaps next year.’
      • ‘Alena accepted the invitation to look him up when she came on her planned visit to Dawson that summer.’
      visit, pay a visit to, call on, go to see, look in on
      visit with, go see
      drop in on
      View synonyms
  • look something up

    • Search for and find a piece of information in a book or database.

      ‘the translation process amounted to little more than looking up words in bilingual dictionaries’
      • ‘I make a point of never looking recipes up in a book, it slows me down.’
      • ‘I have to confess that my English wasn't good enough to know the meaning of this word so I had to look it up in the dictionary.’
      • ‘I tried to look it up in a drug reference book, but I could not find it.’
      • ‘I got out a drug book and looked it up, and from what I could read it said 50 mg was the maximum dose that should be given to an adult.’
      • ‘I can remember my schoolteacher telling me to look a word up in the dictionary.’
      • ‘I needed to return some books and look something up on the internet.’
      • ‘This straightforward organisation makes it easy to look things up, cross-reference and navigate one's way through the book.’
      • ‘When was the last time you went to one of your own books and looked something up?’
      • ‘If one wanted some information about a subject, a staff member could look it up in an index and go retrieve the information.’
      • ‘Later on, I'd look the book up online and see what sort of reviews it received, and then decide whether or not to buy it online.’
  • look up to

    • Have a great deal of respect for (someone)

      ‘he needed a model, someone to look up to’
      • ‘He is the kind of person that people want to look up to and respect as a leader.’
      • ‘We need people we can look up to in order to make sense of our own lives.’
      • ‘He is someone we can respect and look up to, but he's not so high above us that we feel low and downtrodden.’
      • ‘Barry has always been a hero to me, someone to look up to and admire!’
      • ‘It has been brought home to us how much of a local person Clive was and he was very much looked up to by the customers and his friends.’
      • ‘They are players that the younger lads look up to and most importantly learn from.’
      • ‘She was really one of the old aristocratic school who everybody looked up to.’
      • ‘Those were days when teachers were looked up to and discipline was strict.’
      • ‘Old people should be looked up to and respected because they do have experiences that we haven't.’
      • ‘This generation looks up to, respects, and admires their parents.’
      admire, have a high opinion of, think highly of, hold in high regard, regard highly, rate highly, respect, hold in esteem, esteem, value
      honour, revere, venerate, idolize, worship, hero-worship, adulate, put on a pedestal, lionize
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English lōcian (verb), of West Germanic origin; related to German dialect lugen.

Pronunciation:

look

/lʊk/