Definition of long-life in English:

long-life

adjective

  • 1(of food) treated so as to stay fresh for longer than usual.

    ‘long-life milk’
    • ‘Meanwhile, a Wroughton businessman is still collecting clothes, blankets, and long-life food.’
    • ‘Once again, though, the palate flavour tastes like long-life juice, rather than freshly squeezed.’
    • ‘In tropical Indonesia the absence of an integrated refrigerated transport and retailing system means UHT milk (also known as long-life milk) has a ready market.’
    • ‘They managed to buy basics such as long-life milk, cereal, chocolate and biscuits, but Paul was determined to bring his family to safety.’
    • ‘She stocked up on great glass jars with screw tops and loaded a supermarket trolley with every long-life, freeze-dried, vacuum-packed item of food she could lay her frenzied hands on.’
    • ‘If the price of fresh milk rises, people will turn to long-life milk.’
    • ‘It also suggests buying long-life or refillable goods, stopping the junk mail that comes through your letterbox, and composting your garden refuse and kitchen peelings.’
    • ‘Unicef, for example, gives long-life high-protein biscuits made in Norway.’
    • ‘Get out the long-life milk and brew a nice cup of tea.’
    • ‘In 2000, it was hauled before a German court for selling long-life milk and other staples below cost.’
    • ‘He noted the recent awarding of infant industry status to Namdairies for its long-life milk.’
    • ‘The only difference between them is that the former is long-life while the latter is pasteurised.’
    1. 1.1(of a product) able to continue working for longer than others of the same kind.
      ‘long-life batteries’
      • ‘Erdheim says consumers should use primary, or non-rechargeable, batteries - such as alkaline cells - for intermittent use or long-life products, including smoke detectors.’
      • ‘Too often in the past, I've seen even the expensive, long-life batteries last only eight or nine hours, equal to about two typical long cross-country legs.’
      • ‘For example, a shop might use rechargeable instead of disposable batteries, buy long-life light bulbs or choose half-size fax cover sheets instead of full-size.’
      • ‘A Canadian outfit has started volume production of long-life batteries which enable notebooks to run for up to 16 hours.’
      • ‘The system incorporates a long-life battery for reliability.’
      • ‘Cobalt is a key component in long-life batteries.’
      • ‘It involves installing insulated ceilings, geyser jackets, long-life, low-voltage light bulbs, and solar water heaters.’
      • ‘Perhaps in a decade the IT industry will return to sufficient stability to offer long-life products, but not today.’
      • ‘Lightweight, long-life rechargeable batteries are required to power handheld computers and GPS equipment.’
      • ‘Ten years ago, the batteries needed for such a product would have been huge, but mobile phone technology has resulted in light, long-life batteries which can be adapted to products like the new socks.’

Pronunciation:

long-life

/ˌlɒŋˈlʌɪf/