Definition of loneliness in English:

loneliness

noun

  • 1Sadness because one has no friends or company:

    ‘feelings of depression and loneliness’
    • ‘He wept for his cousin, he wept for his loneliness, and most of all he wept for the only woman he could ever love.’
    • ‘Indeed, being alone in a crowd can give us a profound sense of loneliness.’
    • ‘Nurses should be aware, however, that isolation may cause loneliness, stress, or anxiety in patients.’
    • ‘Marriage was the only thing her mother could talk about when she called home and somehow that set a raw edge to her acute loneliness.’
    • ‘A numb frozen loneliness came over him and overpowered him.’
    • ‘Does the applicant act out of an aching loneliness, out of a need to have and control a source of love and affectional response?’
    • ‘Helping to ease the sense of isolation or loneliness, talk therapy focuses on revising the negative thoughts and feelings associated with depression.’
    • ‘Elderly women score more favorably on measures of mental health and college-aged women report less loneliness if they live with pets rather than alone.’
    • ‘She was very happy of course, but the happiness was tempered by inexplicable loneliness and a feeling almost like envy, which she tried very hard not to feel.’
    • ‘Hopefully my loneliness hasn't permeated my writing and bummed you all out.’
    • ‘But none of these figures can begin to communicate the loneliness so many survivors feel, even when surrounded by thousands of others just like them.’
    • ‘What does transpire, then, is a genuine tale of loss, loneliness, and a wrenching longing for personal redemption.’
    • ‘Many feel desperate to return to city life because of the feelings of desperation and loneliness they experience in a countryside setting.’
    • ‘Soon I realized I was using his energy to fill the loneliness I felt.’
    • ‘Again and again loneliness and dissatisfaction would creep into my spirit when the parties were over and I was alone.’
    • ‘That sense of emptiness also can be experienced as loneliness or depression, two other top triggers for your overeating.’
    • ‘After the funeral, visits and invitations to those bereaved might help ease some of the loneliness and isolation.’
    • ‘Crying is now seen as a normal male reaction to anything from bereavement to loneliness to a moving scene on television.’
    • ‘Support is seen as essential as victims may quickly develop feelings of isolation, loneliness, anxiety, withdrawal or depression.’
    • ‘Females who were taught not to trust strangers consistently experienced greater fear of intimacy and more loneliness than did those who were not trained to distrust strangers.’
    solitariness, solitude, lack of company, aloneness, separation
    isolation, remoteness, inaccessibility, seclusion, secludedness
    isolation, friendlessness, lack of companions, lack of friends, forsakenness, abandonment, rejection
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The fact of being without companions; solitariness:
      ‘the loneliness of a sailor's life’
      • ‘He complained to his friends about the loneliness of his position, the crushing responsibility he had and the lack of clear political guidance.’
      • ‘The play's stand-off reflects the loneliness of both the writing and reading process.’
      • ‘All eyes turned to him and for the first time he understood what his father had meant when he talked about the loneliness of command.’
      • ‘Finally, technology threatens to depersonalize our lives and increase our ultimate loneliness.’
      • ‘It charted the bittersweetness of motherhood, the loneliness of being stuck in the countryside and the hilarity of daily life.’
      • ‘I had been there since that September and was starting to feel the loneliness of the situation.’
      • ‘Internationally, there is widespread concern with a break down in community values in developed countries and unacceptable levels of isolation, loneliness and social disintegration, to which Ireland is not immune.’
      • ‘However, while Buffy explored the loneliness of being a hero, Cody just exploits the concept.’
      • ‘Studies have shown that loneliness can contribute to poor health and illness.’
      • ‘Learning to deal with loneliness is an art.’
      • ‘The loneliness forced upon her by her sickness is what makes her so special.’
      • ‘Especially on the left, the defeat in 1849 provoked a period of reassessment which, together with the hardship and loneliness of political exile, led to some substantial political realignments.’
      • ‘Her concerns range from shocking acts of internecine slaughter to the emotional loneliness of the war reporter.’
      • ‘He finds his comfortable loneliness turned upside down when a Chinese American woman enters his world and challenges him to embrace life.’
      • ‘I like the loneliness of it, because there's not so many people you have to deal with.’
      • ‘However, you can learn to live with loneliness, to overcome it and survive.’
      • ‘Have you seen the loneliness of the middle distance runner?’
      • ‘This is how I discovered my real self and overcame my terror of loneliness, poverty, death and all other potential disasters.’
      • ‘Loneliness has rarely sounded so celebratory or inviting.’
      • ‘I used to be able to withstand the loneliness of my personal life by finding refuge in the comfort and familiarity of work.’
  • 2(of a place) the quality of being unfrequented and remote; isolation:

    ‘the loneliness of the farm’
    • ‘That's not the wind you hear; it's the loneliness of the empty farmyards.’

Pronunciation

loneliness

/ˈləʊnlɪnɪs/